web site hit counter Brain Training For Runners: A Revolutionary New Training System to Improve Endurance, Speed, Health, and Results - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Brain Training For Runners: A Revolutionary New Training System to Improve Endurance, Speed, Health, and Results

Availability: Ready to download

Based on new research in exercise physiology, author and running expert Matt Fitzgerald introduces a first-of-its-kind training strategy that he's named Brain Training. Runners of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels can learn to maximize their performance by supplying the brain with the right feedback. Based on Fitzgerald's eight-point brain training system, this book Based on new research in exercise physiology, author and running expert Matt Fitzgerald introduces a first-of-its-kind training strategy that he's named Brain Training. Runners of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels can learn to maximize their performance by supplying the brain with the right feedback. Based on Fitzgerald's eight-point brain training system, this book will help runners: - Resist running fatigue - Use cross-training as brain training - Master the art of pacing - Learn to run in the zone - Outsmart injuries - Fuel the brain for maximum performance Packed with cutting-edge research, real-world examples, and the wisdom of the world's top distance runners, Brain Training for Runners offers easily applied advice and delivers practical results for a better overall running experience.


Compare

Based on new research in exercise physiology, author and running expert Matt Fitzgerald introduces a first-of-its-kind training strategy that he's named Brain Training. Runners of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels can learn to maximize their performance by supplying the brain with the right feedback. Based on Fitzgerald's eight-point brain training system, this book Based on new research in exercise physiology, author and running expert Matt Fitzgerald introduces a first-of-its-kind training strategy that he's named Brain Training. Runners of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels can learn to maximize their performance by supplying the brain with the right feedback. Based on Fitzgerald's eight-point brain training system, this book will help runners: - Resist running fatigue - Use cross-training as brain training - Master the art of pacing - Learn to run in the zone - Outsmart injuries - Fuel the brain for maximum performance Packed with cutting-edge research, real-world examples, and the wisdom of the world's top distance runners, Brain Training for Runners offers easily applied advice and delivers practical results for a better overall running experience.

30 review for Brain Training For Runners: A Revolutionary New Training System to Improve Endurance, Speed, Health, and Results

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I should mention that while reading this book, and gently applying the exercises in it, I twice beat my 5K PR from 7 years ago. I feel like those exercises made me a faster runner. Cross Training is not just doing other sports. There are muscle specific exercises that enhance speed, endurance, and reduce chance of injury. It is based on recent advances in sports physiology. To me, these are sound principles. It even has a forward written by Tim Noakes, MD where he endorses it. Some parts I liked: p I should mention that while reading this book, and gently applying the exercises in it, I twice beat my 5K PR from 7 years ago. I feel like those exercises made me a faster runner. Cross Training is not just doing other sports. There are muscle specific exercises that enhance speed, endurance, and reduce chance of injury. It is based on recent advances in sports physiology. To me, these are sound principles. It even has a forward written by Tim Noakes, MD where he endorses it. Some parts I liked: p 59: Race specific key workouts p 102: Core conditioning workouts p 103: Cross training exercises P 153: Weekly workout template p 176: Stretches to prevent injuries p 203: Part 2: Training plans for various distances I bought a copy after reading it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Roberto Rigolin F Lopes

    Now I'm very very deliberative during long runs. Last one I started with full confidence knowing that I ate and slept well. During the first 5 min, I checked form and started pushing Earth using my hamstrings, you probably noticed shorter days recently. After 30 min, I was warmed up and found a pace where I became running. You read it right: I became running. That is the best feeling out there and I managed to switch from flow to tough reality every one kilometer or so. Reaching 2 hours felt lik Now I'm very very deliberative during long runs. Last one I started with full confidence knowing that I ate and slept well. During the first 5 min, I checked form and started pushing Earth using my hamstrings, you probably noticed shorter days recently. After 30 min, I was warmed up and found a pace where I became running. You read it right: I became running. That is the best feeling out there and I managed to switch from flow to tough reality every one kilometer or so. Reaching 2 hours felt like having a superpower, pain was welcomed cheerfully; I even managed to smile knowing that the little pain was just my lazy brain pushing homeostasis. When I reached 3 hours the pain started asking: who you gonna call? I increased my pace and shouted: GHOSTBUSTERS!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    A solid book of training advice and plans plus a lot of good talk about the science behind running. Some may have criticized Fitzgerald for trying to "run past what is conceivable" - but if you read the book closely that is not what he's saying. It's true, running is mental, and many runners mentally block themselves. Running is going to hurt - and often runners don't push themselves as far as they could, or they push themselves too far. Fitzgerald examines both sides of the issue clearly and as A solid book of training advice and plans plus a lot of good talk about the science behind running. Some may have criticized Fitzgerald for trying to "run past what is conceivable" - but if you read the book closely that is not what he's saying. It's true, running is mental, and many runners mentally block themselves. Running is going to hurt - and often runners don't push themselves as far as they could, or they push themselves too far. Fitzgerald examines both sides of the issue clearly and asks for a happy medium. I also liked the fact that the training plans in this book are longer than the usual 16 weeks that you allot for a half marathon or marathon. As someone who has suffered from injuries, this longer amount of time, plus a focus on good form and gait training as part of the process of running, is important to me. I will say that Fitzgerald is a fan of minimalist running shoes, which are definitely not for all of us. I am also unsure if some of his gait training exercises take into account women's bodies, which have different strides and needs. Most of the examples that he gives in the book are male runners, (including himself multiple times) with the exception being he claims that female runners can use the techniques, and a quote from a female runner saying that it is nice to be in the zone. This book was published in 2007, so I was surprised there wasn't a section addressing women's running. Currently going to be using this book to train for the Richmond Half Marathon in 2017, in hopes of setting a PR. Hoping that it works.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sandi

    Amazing! This was my bible for about a year and the knowledge gained never gets old. I recommend that if you get this book, get sticky tabs so you can quickly access the most meaningful passages. (I'm not kidding about it being my bible). In psyching myself up prior to the marathon of my hour PR, I would recite the passages over, and over again so as to commit the knowledge to memory so I could access it when the race got tough in the later miles. After so many positive outcomes, I can't help bu Amazing! This was my bible for about a year and the knowledge gained never gets old. I recommend that if you get this book, get sticky tabs so you can quickly access the most meaningful passages. (I'm not kidding about it being my bible). In psyching myself up prior to the marathon of my hour PR, I would recite the passages over, and over again so as to commit the knowledge to memory so I could access it when the race got tough in the later miles. After so many positive outcomes, I can't help but attribute some of that success to this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Great book with cutting edge training plans, and insight into what is actually happening during intense/event specific training. The brain needs gradual conditioning to race pace and race distance to avoid sending signals to the muscles to shut down and protect the organs. Also, the maximum number of muscle fibers should be brought into action. When brain senses problems, it starts shutting down the fibers, important to get them activated early in the training cycle. I've not read cover to cover, Great book with cutting edge training plans, and insight into what is actually happening during intense/event specific training. The brain needs gradual conditioning to race pace and race distance to avoid sending signals to the muscles to shut down and protect the organs. Also, the maximum number of muscle fibers should be brought into action. When brain senses problems, it starts shutting down the fibers, important to get them activated early in the training cycle. I've not read cover to cover, and should. There are areas I've re-read and will continue to use as a training companion. One thing about his pace based training method that gives me an issue is how to maintain the pace objectives during training if weather is hot, humid or windy. Perhaps I should re-read for the answer.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Roy Madrid

    Probably the best handbook on running I've ever read. Not much into why things work because, well, nobody fully understands that at the moment or at the time of publication. Nonetheless provides a new and fresh perspective and the importance of the brain body connection and how efficient running makes a world of difference. Probably the best handbook on running I've ever read. Not much into why things work because, well, nobody fully understands that at the moment or at the time of publication. Nonetheless provides a new and fresh perspective and the importance of the brain body connection and how efficient running makes a world of difference.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jess Dollar

    This is a good choice for athletes and coaches that want to learn more about the Central Governor Theory. Fitzgerald sums it up pretty well. It's very important to at least understand that there is more to fatigue than just be tired. Certainly if you believe that lactic acid comes first and then fatigue, you can learn a lot about yourself and how your brain works through this book. As a coach, I know that most people don't want to think about their brain; they want to swim, bike, and run. I see This is a good choice for athletes and coaches that want to learn more about the Central Governor Theory. Fitzgerald sums it up pretty well. It's very important to at least understand that there is more to fatigue than just be tired. Certainly if you believe that lactic acid comes first and then fatigue, you can learn a lot about yourself and how your brain works through this book. As a coach, I know that most people don't want to think about their brain; they want to swim, bike, and run. I see a LOT of thinking mistakes in athletes and it's very frustrating. I see athletes that want to train too hard and minimize the importance of diet and sleep. I see a lot of athletes that talk negatively about themselves all the time. I see a lot of athletes that don't think that their thinking has anything to do with when they slow down in a race or a workout. Being a good athlete is about pushing and manipulating your thinking more than your muscles. A physically gifted person won't get anywhere without the mental tools to embrace pain. The most useful parts of this book for an every-day athlete: running drills and how to use them quick and simple strengthening routines discussion of how to mentally handle pain The training plans that make up half this book look pretty intense but I am sure would be a change of pace for most runners looking to try a different approach to training. I think everyone can benefit from learning to push through intense workouts as a way of breaking through mental barriers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I didn't get to finish this but it was very interesting. I like the way Fitzgerald combines physiology and psychology. I used to fear something bad would happen to me if I ran too far for my body, like my legs would just give out and I'd fall. I learned that even when we have "hit the wall" we still have about an hour's worth of energy available to our muscles. Our brain causes us to feel we've ran out of energy in order to PREVENT muscle death from lack of energy. Knowing this, I was able to be I didn't get to finish this but it was very interesting. I like the way Fitzgerald combines physiology and psychology. I used to fear something bad would happen to me if I ran too far for my body, like my legs would just give out and I'd fall. I learned that even when we have "hit the wall" we still have about an hour's worth of energy available to our muscles. Our brain causes us to feel we've ran out of energy in order to PREVENT muscle death from lack of energy. Knowing this, I was able to become more confident and push myself further. Finally, this book helped me to understand what pain (or discomfort, rather) I could safely ignore and which to listen to in order to prevent injury. This is a fairly high level read but if you're interested in the human body at all, you'll enjoy this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katy W.

    This book was awesome! You might be deceived with a title "brain training," this book is not so much about how to stay positive and train your mind in that aspect. It is about the training needed to fight fatigue, and how the brain is correlated with muscle fatigue. Similar to Endure, but I found there was heavier science and physiology in the first part of this book. Second part has great training plans that I would be tempted to try for any race distance, plus a lot of stability exercises. This book was awesome! You might be deceived with a title "brain training," this book is not so much about how to stay positive and train your mind in that aspect. It is about the training needed to fight fatigue, and how the brain is correlated with muscle fatigue. Similar to Endure, but I found there was heavier science and physiology in the first part of this book. Second part has great training plans that I would be tempted to try for any race distance, plus a lot of stability exercises.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    Makes running seem so logical...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marie-Michèle Larivée

    The most amazing book I’ve red about running and how to keep running against you will. I ran my marathon (almost) without pain du to this book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Davis

    Tapping the source!! I am a big fan of Matt Fitzgerald and can highly recommend his latest book about using a Brain-centered training system. I specifically chose the title above for my review from a famous surfing novel with the same name, because by using Matt’s tips, you will indeed, tap into not only your own power source (brain), but will also inspire you to dig deeper into your body feedback to make huge, lasting neural connections between your brain and muscle fibers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I've read a lot of books on running. although Fitzgerald tends to over use the term 'brain science', I found this book to have interesting training plans that incorporate more than just running. good technique work and interesting speed work. one crtique- his intermediate 5k plan has more mileage per week than the intermediate 10k plan. that doesn't seem logical. I've read a lot of books on running. although Fitzgerald tends to over use the term 'brain science', I found this book to have interesting training plans that incorporate more than just running. good technique work and interesting speed work. one crtique- his intermediate 5k plan has more mileage per week than the intermediate 10k plan. that doesn't seem logical.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Kilman

    This book can feel a little dry at times but the information is excellent. It gets 5 stars because implementing just a couple of tips from this book helped me drop my time by 27 seconds per mile on a 5 mile run at the same heart rate and on the same course! Just reading the section proprioceptive cues would be helpful to any runner.

  15. 4 out of 5

    D

    matt fitzgerald is a pretty reliable, nonextreme resource for serious amateur runners who don't have/can't afford to hire a good coach. this book details a number of exercises and training plans for runners hoping to break through the exhaustion threshhold. matt fitzgerald is a pretty reliable, nonextreme resource for serious amateur runners who don't have/can't afford to hire a good coach. this book details a number of exercises and training plans for runners hoping to break through the exhaustion threshhold.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Henry

    Decent read with good tips on running form, developing resistance to fatigue, and training. But more than half the book is devoted to training plan examples, which could be helpful but could also be seen as filler content.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike Niebrzydowski

    At this point, I am familiar with a lot of this, but I thought the proprioceptive cues were helpful. The exercises/dynamic stretches will be helpful too. I think his approach is a good one. The brain is powerful!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Suukii

    I found this book immensely helpful and followed the intermediate marathon plan. Although his thinking has now moved on, I think the logic of this approach is a realistic one for a club runner.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Trung Nguyen Dang

    Not much new insights to learn. Not much about brain train training but just normal training

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The mental aspect of enduring suffering was really only one chapter of this huge book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Will definitely use some the techniques in this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kaylee

    The introduction was absolutely atrocious. For Tim Noakes' horrendous writing did little more than annoy the expletives out of me - he certainly did not lend credibility to Fitzgerald's argument. Moving on. I picked up this book because I thought, oh, hey, this guy's going to give tips on how to train your brain to get beyond those "I can't do this" barriers - awesome! I'm not an avid runner, but I am a fitness instructor, so I figured there might be tips I could use and share with my classes. I'm The introduction was absolutely atrocious. For Tim Noakes' horrendous writing did little more than annoy the expletives out of me - he certainly did not lend credibility to Fitzgerald's argument. Moving on. I picked up this book because I thought, oh, hey, this guy's going to give tips on how to train your brain to get beyond those "I can't do this" barriers - awesome! I'm not an avid runner, but I am a fitness instructor, so I figured there might be tips I could use and share with my classes. I'm always looking for new physiology tips to apply, and brain-related ones are just as important to me as keeping joints healthy. Alas, Fitzgerald immediately lost my respect when he effectively said, "The body has safety mechanisms in place to protect against overexertion -- let's go beyond those, yeah?" There's a difference between training your brain to allow you to tune out that voice that says, "oh, I can't make it another minute" and training your brain to allow you to use up ALL of your energy reserves. Saying, "Your brain will let your muscles deplete more energy if you're being chased by a lion than if you're running a marathon" is not a glowing recommendation to push your body to the brink of safe exercise. After all, he's not saying you're going to build your body's endurance/strength/energy reserves/etc.; he's saying you're going to learn to mute an integral part of your brain (you know, the part that realizes you're dying in the jaws of that lion if you don't risk a heart attack/aneurysm/whatever by pushing harder than you do when there's no lion threat - like a damn marathon). The training guides are pretty lovely -- I would definitely model my someday-when-I-go-crazy-and-sign-up-for-half-marathons training after his approach. I wholeheartedly believe in the cross-training and recovery aspects he touts; I just don't think training your brain to stop doing its job of monitoring your body's ability to keep going is a sign of intelligence.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Damon Henrichs

    This is a great book with a new way to look at how "fatigue" works, what runners can do about it, and how to train better as a result of that knowledge. Traditional training (while still in most ways getting it right in terms of HOW to train for best results) suggest that the body physically breaks down in many ways when we "hit the wall", but new science has shown this to be largely untrue. I can't remember without looking at the book all the "sciencee" aspects of it, but his arguments are stro This is a great book with a new way to look at how "fatigue" works, what runners can do about it, and how to train better as a result of that knowledge. Traditional training (while still in most ways getting it right in terms of HOW to train for best results) suggest that the body physically breaks down in many ways when we "hit the wall", but new science has shown this to be largely untrue. I can't remember without looking at the book all the "sciencee" aspects of it, but his arguments are strong and seem valid. At any rate, he is not suggesting you re-invent the wheel anyway. . .just add some things to your training regimin. Great book, well written, and includes training programs for a variety of races. I'm training for the Houston Marathon with it right now.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Bauer Kolak

    I find that about 90% of everything I've read in Matt Fitzgerald's books is the same: run as much as you can, fuel with carb drinks/gels to a specific amount per hour (and get some protein), lose some weight, etc. Its that last 10% that is always about 2/3 of they way in that I really want from each book. For Brain Training, it was the proprioceptive cues. I'm already committed to the Furman method right now, so I'm not going to flip over to one of Matt's program mid-training, but I am going to I find that about 90% of everything I've read in Matt Fitzgerald's books is the same: run as much as you can, fuel with carb drinks/gels to a specific amount per hour (and get some protein), lose some weight, etc. Its that last 10% that is always about 2/3 of they way in that I really want from each book. For Brain Training, it was the proprioceptive cues. I'm already committed to the Furman method right now, so I'm not going to flip over to one of Matt's program mid-training, but I am going to try to commit more thought to how I'm striking the ground, the "navel to spine" idea, and embracing the suffering. Side note: I can't believe I have become the kind of nut job who worries about glycogen levels and pronation. What happened to me?!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    All the information in this book is generally good and correct, but Fitzgerald overhypes his whole brain training theme. He acts like what he recommends is new and revolutionary, when in reality, many runners across the globe are doing the stuff in this book. The chapter I really like was the one about embracing the pain of racing. Instead of this book, I highly recommend another book by this author: All the information in this book is generally good and correct, but Fitzgerald overhypes his whole brain training theme. He acts like what he recommends is new and revolutionary, when in reality, many runners across the globe are doing the stuff in this book. The chapter I really like was the one about embracing the pain of racing. Instead of this book, I highly recommend another book by this author:

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark Fallon

    A good book, with some interesting concepts. However, Fitzgerald makes some assumptions based on incomplete scientific research. A lot of the rationale for his methods centers on initial studies of certain chemicals (e.g., interlukin-6) and the possible ways the brain may function. However, these are newer studies, with very limited clinical trails, and no widespread consensus on causation vs. association. It will be interesting to see how this book holds up as we learn more about the brain.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Aguilera

    I read all if the book up to the training programs. I really enjoyed Chapter 3 breaking through the wall. Fatigue "is an effort by the brain to prevent a dangerous loss of homeostasis by reducing muscle activity and my producing feelings of discomfort and loss of motivation." "...but exhaustion always occurs when the runner feels completely exhausted-because that feeling of exhaustion is what fatigue really is." I read all if the book up to the training programs. I really enjoyed Chapter 3 breaking through the wall. Fatigue "is an effort by the brain to prevent a dangerous loss of homeostasis by reducing muscle activity and my producing feelings of discomfort and loss of motivation." "...but exhaustion always occurs when the runner feels completely exhausted-because that feeling of exhaustion is what fatigue really is."

  28. 5 out of 5

    courtney

    i really enjoyed reading the different pieces of advice. especially the parts on becoming mentally stronger. i think this is a good book to just take little pieces here & there. gave this book a three because every runner is different and not all advice may work for everybody. second half includes training plans---after skimming those don't think i'm personally interested those particular ones. i really enjoyed reading the different pieces of advice. especially the parts on becoming mentally stronger. i think this is a good book to just take little pieces here & there. gave this book a three because every runner is different and not all advice may work for everybody. second half includes training plans---after skimming those don't think i'm personally interested those particular ones.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I was quite happy with the start of the book. Matt gave new insight into the way we view running and how we are able to push back the wall of fatigue. However the last half of the book was about training. Training plans get covered in a lot of other books and it felt misplaced here. I would love to have a full book on just the brain behind running, and the part that was in the book was well written, however I was left disappointed at the end.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I mostly skimmed this book. Distance running advice is dangerous because no one piece of advice is universal. Except maybe "If it hurts, stop doing it." This book worked really well for me. It has detailed plans and schedules for running. If you used to be a runner and want to get back on the horse, this is a great book. I mostly skimmed this book. Distance running advice is dangerous because no one piece of advice is universal. Except maybe "If it hurts, stop doing it." This book worked really well for me. It has detailed plans and schedules for running. If you used to be a runner and want to get back on the horse, this is a great book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.