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Expeditions Comics: The Philippine Graphic/Fiction Awards Vol. 1

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An asthmatic girl, sustained by a diet of cough syrup, confronts the creatures from Hell who happen to live under her bed. Lapu Lapu, the revered Datu of Mactan, stands on a coastline to defend his land against an approaching enemy fleet, ready to wield his blade in what would be the most significant battle of his life and his descendants' history. A young boy searches the An asthmatic girl, sustained by a diet of cough syrup, confronts the creatures from Hell who happen to live under her bed. Lapu Lapu, the revered Datu of Mactan, stands on a coastline to defend his land against an approaching enemy fleet, ready to wield his blade in what would be the most significant battle of his life and his descendants' history. A young boy searches the corners of his house for a lost toy, only to unwittingly discover other things hidden in the shadows. An artist afflicted with a creative drought gets a little help from the ragtag characters inhabiting his brain. These fragments torn from daydreams and nightmares compose the imaginative storylines and fascinating artwork of the very first Philippine Graphic Fiction Awards compilation. As a creative venture of Fully Booked and globally renowned author Neil Gaiman, the competition called upon writers and artists all over the Philippines to take up Gaiman's challenge to encourage "Filipino Unrealism." The directive was simple: keep it unreal. With a foreword written by Neil Gaiman, this compendium features the winners and short-listed entries of the comics category. Highly engaging, terrifying, and flavored with the unique Pinoy sense of humor, these works are testament to the deep wellspring of Filipino talent and imagination.


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An asthmatic girl, sustained by a diet of cough syrup, confronts the creatures from Hell who happen to live under her bed. Lapu Lapu, the revered Datu of Mactan, stands on a coastline to defend his land against an approaching enemy fleet, ready to wield his blade in what would be the most significant battle of his life and his descendants' history. A young boy searches the An asthmatic girl, sustained by a diet of cough syrup, confronts the creatures from Hell who happen to live under her bed. Lapu Lapu, the revered Datu of Mactan, stands on a coastline to defend his land against an approaching enemy fleet, ready to wield his blade in what would be the most significant battle of his life and his descendants' history. A young boy searches the corners of his house for a lost toy, only to unwittingly discover other things hidden in the shadows. An artist afflicted with a creative drought gets a little help from the ragtag characters inhabiting his brain. These fragments torn from daydreams and nightmares compose the imaginative storylines and fascinating artwork of the very first Philippine Graphic Fiction Awards compilation. As a creative venture of Fully Booked and globally renowned author Neil Gaiman, the competition called upon writers and artists all over the Philippines to take up Gaiman's challenge to encourage "Filipino Unrealism." The directive was simple: keep it unreal. With a foreword written by Neil Gaiman, this compendium features the winners and short-listed entries of the comics category. Highly engaging, terrifying, and flavored with the unique Pinoy sense of humor, these works are testament to the deep wellspring of Filipino talent and imagination.

46 review for Expeditions Comics: The Philippine Graphic/Fiction Awards Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Exactly seven years ago, in July 2005, the American popular fantasy author and graphic artist, Neil Gaiman, visited the Philippines. One of his many fans here in Manila, Jaime Daez, the Managing Director of one of the big bookstore chains, Fully Booked, came up with this bright idea: a contest of short graphic stories depicting Filipino values and opened it to all budding Filipino graphic artists. Among the judges were Jaime Daez and his two male friends. The winners and the runners up are compi Exactly seven years ago, in July 2005, the American popular fantasy author and graphic artist, Neil Gaiman, visited the Philippines. One of his many fans here in Manila, Jaime Daez, the Managing Director of one of the big bookstore chains, Fully Booked, came up with this bright idea: a contest of short graphic stories depicting Filipino values and opened it to all budding Filipino graphic artists. Among the judges were Jaime Daez and his two male friends. The winners and the runners up are compiled in this book: FIRST PLACE: The Sad Mad Incredible But True Adventures of Hika Girl. by Clara Lala Gallardo and Maria Gallardo A young girl with asthma and so she cannot play and she feels ostracized. She begins to talk with the creatures in the underworld and makes a pact with the devil. [I am not sure why this won. Neither do I like the illustrations. Sorry for being harsh but I find this as a garbage, really. But maybe the author is pretty? And since all the judges are male, who knows? Personality always counts during contests.] – 1 STAR SECOND PLACE: Splat! by Manuel “Manix” Abrera. Totally wordless comics similar to the later works of Abrera, “12.” It’s about a boy that mistakenly splattered ink on the paper his working. He cannot erase the big splat so he takes out the small people from his skull and they do the work. [I’ve seen this character and technique already so that lessened the excitement while reading. I was a bit shocked realizing what was happening toward the end but the last frame made a lot of difference. Brilliant but I am not sure if the fact that it is wordless gave it an edge over the others.] – 4 STARS THIRD PLACE (TIE): Defiant: The Battle of Mactan by Juan Paolo Ferrer and Chester Ocampo. The classic tale between Magellan (who “discovered” the Philippines) and Lapu-Lapu, (the first hero of the Philippines). [Had the authors done a bit of research, they would find out that their story about the Battle of Mactan was wrong. Read carefully some unbiased history books based on Pigafetta’s accounts and you'll know that Magellan was boisterous and he underestimated Lapu-Lapu and his men. He volunteered to fight Lapu-Lapu alone telling his men to step aside and he (Magellan) was killed by Lapu-Lapu accidentally and not as valiantly as the authors pictured here. So guys, please be careful glorifying the people in history. I know your intent is good but we need to be careful especially that this medium (comics) , appeals very much to the young people.] - 1 STAR THIRD PLACE (TIE): The Guilty by Vergel Nino A. Vergara. Story of a priest who is a son of another priest. I will not tell you the story but it is good. [However, the texts, although typewritten, are in very small font and the color is too dark that reading could strain your eyes. Also, the author did not give any hint on the time frame. Because of the event in the story, it feels old yet the language and the clothes are modern.] - 3 STARS Karnabal by Benjor Catindig and Joonee Garcia. The story of a young man who inherits an old and decrepit carnival from his father. He wants to sell it but the strange people in the show do not know where to go. [Feels ordinary but the illustrations are great and the dialogue and texts are carefully chosen and limited to what is necessary to convey the message. Not wordy at all.] - 3 STARS The Moondancer by Anna Pallon and Adele Raya. The story of a beautiful woman who is transformed into a fairy in the forest at full moon. [I don’t get the whole point. Although at times beautiful and poetic, the texts are just too many. The illustrations look cluttered. I thought it would have been more effective if this was done in color rather than black and white.] - 2 STARS The Prophet by Frances Alcaraz and Alvin B. Yapan. The story of a young boy lost in the wilderness of a forest where he meets all the night scary creatures. The boy goes to the forest to be cured. [Very typical Filipino rural horror story. You have all the Philippine mythological night creatures here. I got goose bumps while reading because for a while, I remembered the fear that I had when I was a kid in the barrio at night. Very effective. I just did not like the ending though. It seemed to me that it ended abruptly because there was a limit in the number of frames. Otherwise, this could have been expanded into a full-length graphic novel (series) like "Trese".] - 4 STARS Where Eagles Fly by Leonard John C. Banaag. The story of an eagle family whose existence is threatened by men. [Hands down, for me, the best story in this anthology. I was sad reading the story. Same feeling when I closed E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web, my favorite children's book. The illustrations are also adequate. Not strikingly beautiful but not dark as the other entries. I wonder why this did not get the nod of the jurors? Maybe they were not environmentally conscious?] - 5 STARS Why I Wake Up Late by Avid Liongoren. A very simple story of a young man who wakes up at around 1pm everyday. [There are no frills. No gimmicks. Just plain story telling that you can interpret in many ways and the last frame says it all. I’d like to think that the young man works either as a call-center agent or a male prostitute, but that’s me. You can make yours.] - 4 STARS So, if I were the lone judge in this contest, these would have been my winners: 1st: Leonard John C. Banaag's "Where Eagles Fly" 2nd: Manix Abrera's "Splat!" 3rd: Avid Liongoren's "Why I Wake Up Late" But you see, I am not a juror. Nevertheless, I enjoyed reading and viewing this anthology. More! More!

  2. 5 out of 5

    DC

    The stories in this book are (mostly) dark. They seem to haunt me everywhere-- from the soft breeze, the dark corner, and the unseen footstep of the unknown. The works in this book are truly wonderful tales, grim as most of them may be. While I'm not surprised of the talent showcased in this book, I was pretty intrigued to read about Neil Gaiman's thoughts and ideas about the local (read: Philippine) comic scene. I enjoyed his insights, and made me long for more-more-more Filipino literature. Th The stories in this book are (mostly) dark. They seem to haunt me everywhere-- from the soft breeze, the dark corner, and the unseen footstep of the unknown. The works in this book are truly wonderful tales, grim as most of them may be. While I'm not surprised of the talent showcased in this book, I was pretty intrigued to read about Neil Gaiman's thoughts and ideas about the local (read: Philippine) comic scene. I enjoyed his insights, and made me long for more-more-more Filipino literature. This is a unique, though ambitious, compilation. It's brutal, (un)real, and softly magical. An inspiring and enjoyable read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Judie

    Great collection of things dark and magical. What stood out to me: Hika Girl, Battle of Mactan [which I have read many times over but will always be poignant, frame by frame], and The Prophet [wise use of a few of our own supernaturals].

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  5. 5 out of 5

    _imarajay

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aika

  7. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Reyes

  8. 4 out of 5

    shan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dwindebox

  10. 5 out of 5

    Coni Francisco

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joy

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Francisco

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mogzy Bigornia

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jobs Ko

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kidd

  17. 5 out of 5

    Coeli

  18. 5 out of 5

    Miko

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christa绮思

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jayps

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wolfwood13

  23. 4 out of 5

    Luokeshan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennica

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marison

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kooooly

  27. 5 out of 5

    Arden

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Ann

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jest

  30. 4 out of 5

    Foxglove Zayuri

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  32. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  33. 4 out of 5

    John

  34. 5 out of 5

    Josephine

  35. 4 out of 5

    kwesi 章英狮

  36. 5 out of 5

    Marco

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jamila Velasco

  38. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Solosod

  39. 5 out of 5

    Thyalla Ariantho

  40. 4 out of 5

    Jenny-lyn Manalo

  41. 5 out of 5

    Bijaa

  42. 4 out of 5

    Meryki

  43. 4 out of 5

    Rocel Pagayanan

  44. 5 out of 5

    Miri La

  45. 5 out of 5

    Jerisprudence

  46. 4 out of 5

    Raine

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