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How to Talk to an Autistic Kid

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Kids with autism have a hard time communicating, which can be frustrating for autistic kids and for their peers. In this intimate yet practical book, author Daniel Stefanski, a fourteen-year-old boy with autism, helps readers understand why autistic kids act the way they do and offers specific suggestions on how to get along with them. While many "typical" kids know someone Kids with autism have a hard time communicating, which can be frustrating for autistic kids and for their peers. In this intimate yet practical book, author Daniel Stefanski, a fourteen-year-old boy with autism, helps readers understand why autistic kids act the way they do and offers specific suggestions on how to get along with them. While many "typical" kids know someone with autism, they sometimes misunderstand the behavior of autistic kids, which can seem antisocial or even offensive–even if the person with autism really wants to be friends. The result of this confusion is often painful for those with autism: bullying, teasing, excluding, or ignoring. How to Talk to an Autistic is an antidote. Written by an autistic kid for non-autistic kids, it provides personal stories, knowledgeable explanations, and supportive advice–all in Daniel's unique and charming voice and accompanied by lively illustrations. Always straightforward and often humorous, How to Talk to an Autistic Kid will give readers–kids and adults alike–the confidence and tools needed to befriend autistic kids. They'll also feel like they've made a friend already–Daniel.  


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Kids with autism have a hard time communicating, which can be frustrating for autistic kids and for their peers. In this intimate yet practical book, author Daniel Stefanski, a fourteen-year-old boy with autism, helps readers understand why autistic kids act the way they do and offers specific suggestions on how to get along with them. While many "typical" kids know someone Kids with autism have a hard time communicating, which can be frustrating for autistic kids and for their peers. In this intimate yet practical book, author Daniel Stefanski, a fourteen-year-old boy with autism, helps readers understand why autistic kids act the way they do and offers specific suggestions on how to get along with them. While many "typical" kids know someone with autism, they sometimes misunderstand the behavior of autistic kids, which can seem antisocial or even offensive–even if the person with autism really wants to be friends. The result of this confusion is often painful for those with autism: bullying, teasing, excluding, or ignoring. How to Talk to an Autistic is an antidote. Written by an autistic kid for non-autistic kids, it provides personal stories, knowledgeable explanations, and supportive advice–all in Daniel's unique and charming voice and accompanied by lively illustrations. Always straightforward and often humorous, How to Talk to an Autistic Kid will give readers–kids and adults alike–the confidence and tools needed to befriend autistic kids. They'll also feel like they've made a friend already–Daniel.  

30 review for How to Talk to an Autistic Kid

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I picked this up for my younger son (he's 9) to read, because I thought it might help him understand his older brother a little better. See, my oldest son (he's 12) was diagnosed with PDDNOS when he was 6. That means he's on the autism spectrum, but it's not as noticeable as it is with some kids. Basically, he just gets pegged as a weirdo. A lot. Why? Because he does weird stuff, of course! Or at least, that's what my 9 year old thinks. This book was written by a 14 year old autistic boy, named Dan I picked this up for my younger son (he's 9) to read, because I thought it might help him understand his older brother a little better. See, my oldest son (he's 12) was diagnosed with PDDNOS when he was 6. That means he's on the autism spectrum, but it's not as noticeable as it is with some kids. Basically, he just gets pegged as a weirdo. A lot. Why? Because he does weird stuff, of course! Or at least, that's what my 9 year old thinks. This book was written by a 14 year old autistic boy, named Daniel Stefanski. I have to say, it does a good job of hitting the basics. My younger son and I read it together, and it was easy to discuss the 'tips' Daniel gives, because it was written in such a kid-friendly way. Language difficulties are a huge problem for kids like this, and the section What I hear was really pertinent. In the book, a little boy is saying, "My teacher is a thousand years old", and the other boy is picturing an extremely old man. We've had a lot of personal experience with stuff like that. I remember one time we were trying to make my son feel better about an eye appointment, and my husband told him, "Don't worry about the eye drops, you won't feel a thing". This led to hysteria, because he thought the eye drops were going to numb his entire body. Yes, seriously. What I don't see was another section we talked a lot about. Most people don't think about how much we read body language for social cues, but I've learned over the years that it's a HUGE issue if you can't. One of the things we talked out was how difficult it is for my oldest to figure out if people are kidding or not. If you can't tell the difference between Good job! (translation: You are awesome!) and Good job. (translation: You are a dumbass.) then you have no idea what the appropriate response back should be. I remember one time, when my oldest was about 8, he came crying to me at the pool, because this other little girl was being mean to him. I asked him what happened, and he said that she was saying that he was a 'slow swimmer'. So what did she say exactly, honey? She said, 'You can't catch me!". Um. Yeah, it actually took me a while to convince him that the nice little girl just wanted him to play tag in the water, because he wasn't buying it at first. As far as he was concerned, she was a mean kid who had it out for him. In case you're wondering, he finally gave her another chance, and they spent the rest of the afternoon happily smacking each other on the back. The entire book is is a fun way to help kids who don't have autism understand a bit more about kids that do. The main goal is to hopefully show that just because someone is quirky or odd, doesn't mean that they don't have feelings. I know it wasn't written especially for siblings, but it helped us out because it was so short and to the point. There isn't much (if any) medical terminology in the book, either. Bonus! Recommended as a good conversation starter!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ari Reavis

    This was a really nice an interestimg read. I plan on reading this to my kids to help them understand their little brother a little more.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carina Ortega

    I felt that this book was really informing about autistic children and really eye opening I would re-read this book in the future.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Loraena

    This is a great little book written by a 14-year-old boy with autism. He explains autism well and provides really helpful info for kids or adults. I kinda want to give this book to everyone in my daughter’s life. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Delights

    How To Talk To An Autistic Kid is a very endearing picture book with wonderful suggestions on how to speak and interact with an autistic kid in a more respectful and kind manner. The book highlights the importance of really accepting and treating autistic kids just like any other kid, because even though they are different in some ways, they are very similar in other ways. It also teaches kids to not be afraid of befriending an autistic kid. Written by a 14-year-old autistic kid himself, this bo How To Talk To An Autistic Kid is a very endearing picture book with wonderful suggestions on how to speak and interact with an autistic kid in a more respectful and kind manner. The book highlights the importance of really accepting and treating autistic kids just like any other kid, because even though they are different in some ways, they are very similar in other ways. It also teaches kids to not be afraid of befriending an autistic kid. Written by a 14-year-old autistic kid himself, this book offers a unique point of view that you really won’t get from mainstream books about autism that are more impersonal and make you feel like you are just being given information. What’s great about this book is that you can put a face to this autistic disorder, of someone who is actually experiencing it first-hand. I don’t know if you can get any more sincere than that! How To Talk To An Autistic Kid really personalizes the whole reading experience in an extremely engaging way. Daniel tackles a sensitive subject with grace as well as humor at times. This book offers priceless advice in a fun, very approachable, easy-to-read set-up, with easy-to-follow tips, and includes many colorful illustrations to reiterate each point. And by the end of the book, you really feel like you got to know Daniel, who is more than just an autistic kid. Daniel does a great job of really pouring his heart out in this book in an effort to help make the lives of autistic kids a little easier and better socially, not only at school, but any place where they are among non-autistic peers. Adults will also find this book helpful and it will heighten their understanding of autistic behavior in kids and learn what to do in certain situations. I am really glad Daniel decided to write this book. By doing this, his contributions to the autistic society will be endless. And even decades from now, autistic kids as well as non-autistic kids will still be benefiting from his words of wisdom, and he will have touched so many lives because of it. Daniel is truly an inspiration. So whether you are a teacher, classmate, parent, sibling, relative, friend, librarian, or neighbor of an autistic kid or you just want to learn more about autistic behavior and communication, I HIGHLY recommend that you read this book. Because if you don’t, you will really be missing out on something very special and important. If you are a parent of an autistic kid, let your kid’s school know that this book is a must have. It will really help your child feel comfortable and accepted by their classmates at school.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wulfwyn

    How To talk to an Autistic Kid is an awesome book. It is written by 14 year old Daniel Stefanski, who is on the spectrum. He has done a remarkable job educating both his peers and adults. It is a short book, some may call it a picture book for the middle school age. I think we can all learn from it. I am raising an autistic child. It is not easy watching him struggle to have conversations with other who do not understand. I would like to ask every teacher out there to get this book and find a wa How To talk to an Autistic Kid is an awesome book. It is written by 14 year old Daniel Stefanski, who is on the spectrum. He has done a remarkable job educating both his peers and adults. It is a short book, some may call it a picture book for the middle school age. I think we can all learn from it. I am raising an autistic child. It is not easy watching him struggle to have conversations with other who do not understand. I would like to ask every teacher out there to get this book and find a way to share it with your classroom. I love the way Daniel talks about how autistic children "hear" and "see", (or not see), things. He also brought up important things like getting stuck, not remembering to share, some of the different behaviors that some autistic children do and even the sensory issues. I love the section on Be a good friend where Daniel says, Don't feel sorry for me. I have autism, but I'm cool with who I am." This is my wish for Jr. Daniel reminds us to reach out to children with autism. He also asks us to stand up for children with autism from the bullies and then tells us how. And he calls us the hero. To me he is the hero.

  7. 5 out of 5

    River Rosales

    I read this book because I don't find a lot of books about autism that I like, especially when they're directed at youth. Though I'm an autistic adult, I like looking through resources to find ones I might suggest to others, especially when it comes to educating themselves or their children. This book was well written, gives you all the basic information about autism while not overwhelming you and also letting you know that everyone is different. I think it's a good resource for an introduction t I read this book because I don't find a lot of books about autism that I like, especially when they're directed at youth. Though I'm an autistic adult, I like looking through resources to find ones I might suggest to others, especially when it comes to educating themselves or their children. This book was well written, gives you all the basic information about autism while not overwhelming you and also letting you know that everyone is different. I think it's a good resource for an introduction to autism and behaviour around people with disabilities (both how to act around someone with autism and how someone with autism might act). I didn't find any ableist language or any shaming in the tone, which is often an issue. I'd recommend it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Genre: Juvenile nonfiction, interpersonal relationships/ friendships Format: Print Plot: Daniel explains how to talk to kids with autism - kids like him. He explains why he can act and talks a little different, and how other kids can respond to these differences. Readers advisory: Review citation: Booklist 2011 Source: Children's Core Collection Recommended age: 7-12 Genre: Juvenile nonfiction, interpersonal relationships/ friendships Format: Print Plot: Daniel explains how to talk to kids with autism - kids like him. He explains why he can act and talks a little different, and how other kids can respond to these differences. Readers advisory: Review citation: Booklist 2011 Source: Children's Core Collection Recommended age: 7-12

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Daniel Stefanski is a 14-year-old autistic kid. He gives some great advice about understanding and accepting autism.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Simple put...this is one of the best books I've found so far in helping kids better understand what it's like to have autism. Simple put...this is one of the best books I've found so far in helping kids better understand what it's like to have autism.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rag

    This helped me understand better. It's hard being autistic. It helped me be able to talk and understand my younger brother in a whole different way. This helped me understand better. It's hard being autistic. It helped me be able to talk and understand my younger brother in a whole different way.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    My daughter was recently diagnosed with autism at the age of 9. She is very intelligent, reads a lot, and has an expansive vocabulary. She will tell people she has autism but I have a feeling that she didn't really understand what that is or what it means for her. I found very few books at our library talking about autism that are actually intended for autistic children. Most are for siblings of autistic children to help them understand why their brother or sister acts differently and that it is My daughter was recently diagnosed with autism at the age of 9. She is very intelligent, reads a lot, and has an expansive vocabulary. She will tell people she has autism but I have a feeling that she didn't really understand what that is or what it means for her. I found very few books at our library talking about autism that are actually intended for autistic children. Most are for siblings of autistic children to help them understand why their brother or sister acts differently and that it is okay to feel all the feels about it. How to Talk to an Autistic Kid isn't aimed at autistic kids either but the author has autism and wrote the book for neurotypical kids. It was a great conversation starter with my daughter though as he describes his personal brand of autism (since no two kids with autism are the same) and she was able to identify ways in which she interacted similarly or differently. I think this validated her experience because she realizes that their are other kids out there who share similar struggles and gifts. Whether you are trying to understand a child with autism, start a conversation with a kid with autism, or teaching neurotypical kids about kids with autism, How To Talk to An Autistic Kid is a great place to start.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan Pagano

    I am a 1/1 para-professional who is working from home for the next few weeks. Since I can't work with the student directly I'm trying to work on as much professional development as I can. This was a fast book that is geared toward kids but is useful for anyone, especially those who don't have experience working with autistic children. Daniel gives advice not only to his particular likes/needs but mentions how no two kids are exactly the same and what he likes may be completely different from ano I am a 1/1 para-professional who is working from home for the next few weeks. Since I can't work with the student directly I'm trying to work on as much professional development as I can. This was a fast book that is geared toward kids but is useful for anyone, especially those who don't have experience working with autistic children. Daniel gives advice not only to his particular likes/needs but mentions how no two kids are exactly the same and what he likes may be completely different from another child. Very fast read. I borrowed it from my local public library using Overdrive and the Libby app.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cara Byrne

    “I want to be included just like anyone else. I may be different, but I’m a person, too […] Please don’t ignore autistic kids just because they’re different.” In How to Talk to an Autistic Kid, 14-year-old Daniel Stefanski, who was diagnosed with Autism at age 9, provides a guidebook with short chapters about what Autism means to him and how he wants those with Autism to be treated. The implied reader of this book is a middle school child who does not have autism, as Stefanski focuses much of th “I want to be included just like anyone else. I may be different, but I’m a person, too […] Please don’t ignore autistic kids just because they’re different.” In How to Talk to an Autistic Kid, 14-year-old Daniel Stefanski, who was diagnosed with Autism at age 9, provides a guidebook with short chapters about what Autism means to him and how he wants those with Autism to be treated. The implied reader of this book is a middle school child who does not have autism, as Stefanski focuses much of the lightly-illustrated book on how to engage and develop a friendship with someone with Autism.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Denise Lauron

    Wonderful! Great information, written by an expert on the topic. This will hopefully help other kids and even adults understand their friends with autism. It's well written in easy to understand language. Wonderful! Great information, written by an expert on the topic. This will hopefully help other kids and even adults understand their friends with autism. It's well written in easy to understand language.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen Mateus

    Great book written by a talented young boy. Daniel has taught me so much, I hope all schools read this book with their young students to help them understand autism better. As an adult, I wished I had read something like this earlier.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aimee Ortega

    My daughter and I read this book together today. It is such great insight into autism. And definitely makes me feel empowered to be be friendlier to others around me with autism. Great book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Leslea

    For kids by a kid.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Nekuda

    excellent resource for anyone just starting out in the autistic world

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jenifer Popolizio

    Excellent book for parents and educators alike for teaching tolerance and the importance of friendship.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Rose

    Amazing and a good book to just get a quick idea of the child or any1 ty

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Rogers

    Simple and effective. Good for kids (AND adults) 7 & up!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janet Sullivan

    If you have an autistic student this is a wonderful book!! I will be reading this book often

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marti King Young

    A great book for adults as well as children. As the mom to an autistic child, this book was quite insightful. I plan to keep this book with me and when strangers approach my son and try to scold him because they don't understand, I'm going to offer them a chance to read it. A great book for adults as well as children. As the mom to an autistic child, this book was quite insightful. I plan to keep this book with me and when strangers approach my son and try to scold him because they don't understand, I'm going to offer them a chance to read it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book is an outstanding mix of factual information and personal experience. Author, 14 year old Daniel Stefanski, does an excellent job of sharing his perspective, and explaining commonalities and differences among students with and without autism, in a very unassuming way. The book explains the background and reasons behind some of the behaviors one might see in a child with autism. It also explains some social nuances that are difficult for children with autism to interpret and manage, and This book is an outstanding mix of factual information and personal experience. Author, 14 year old Daniel Stefanski, does an excellent job of sharing his perspective, and explaining commonalities and differences among students with and without autism, in a very unassuming way. The book explains the background and reasons behind some of the behaviors one might see in a child with autism. It also explains some social nuances that are difficult for children with autism to interpret and manage, and gives suggestions for what other children can say to handle, respond, and support a child with autism in these instances. Daniel, as he describes himself in the story is a highly relatable person, and while he explains things that make him unique, he shows how he is very much like “other kids.” In the last portion of the book, Daniel makes a point that bullying a child with autism, or any child, for that matter, is unacceptable, and encourages children to stand up against instances of bullying, and to act as advocates. Daniel also briefly addresses the challenges that siblings of children with autism face, and expresses that it is important that others are accepting and understanding of the siblings as well. This book not only promotes self-love, knowledge, and respect for others, but it goes beyond that to help raise awareness of the feelings and experiences of children with autism, in addition to exploring issues of social injustice, and encouraging others to take social action.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Skyler

    The autistic person: a very rare topic in the realm of things about autistic people. That sounds strange, doesn't it? But, in most media surrounding autistic persons, actual autistic people tend to never be apart of it. Even Rainman, the guy that everyone and their dogs' mind jumps too upon mention of Autism, didn't have autism in real life, but another disorder. It seems that nobody knows how to write autistic people, but more autism caricatures. So, when I saw this book, as a fellow autistic p The autistic person: a very rare topic in the realm of things about autistic people. That sounds strange, doesn't it? But, in most media surrounding autistic persons, actual autistic people tend to never be apart of it. Even Rainman, the guy that everyone and their dogs' mind jumps too upon mention of Autism, didn't have autism in real life, but another disorder. It seems that nobody knows how to write autistic people, but more autism caricatures. So, when I saw this book, as a fellow autistic person, my interest was piked. I had just came back from my last foray into book reading, Magyk, with a terrible taste in my mouth. Could this book be a form of mouthwash? (Probably the weirdest sentence I've ever typed, by the way.) Short answer: Yes! Long answer: God, yes! This book really highlights the need for representation of actual autistic people in the media. Who else to talk about autism than those who have it? You may argue that you already know about autism, but this book contains facts that are not often highlighted, such as the high presence of seizures in autistic people. Some other might argue that the writing style and art are juvenile, but the author is, as noted on the cover, a kid. Autistic or otherwise, his art and writing are impressive for the age of fourteen years old. This book made me really happy, and hopeful that in the future there will be more autistic authors in the mainstream.

  27. 5 out of 5

    TAKISHIA

    How to Talk to an Autistic Kid is a non-fiction book written for children from the ages of 4 and up, which teaches children how to talk with children with autism. The book is written by a teenager that has autism, which provides an insider view of the disability. The book is written in a humorous tone, but also provides key information on how to communicate with a person with autism. In the classroom, this book will help to teach students how to effectively communicate with other students with a How to Talk to an Autistic Kid is a non-fiction book written for children from the ages of 4 and up, which teaches children how to talk with children with autism. The book is written by a teenager that has autism, which provides an insider view of the disability. The book is written in a humorous tone, but also provides key information on how to communicate with a person with autism. In the classroom, this book will help to teach students how to effectively communicate with other students with autism. Children will be able to relate to this book because the author is a child, and they can see themselves in the book. The author talks about various issues that children with autism face from social issues like their ability to seem anti-social to bullying and teasing. This book can be used as a tool to help teach children and adults how to engage individuals with autism and give them key tips on how to include them in various social groups that ordinarily they would shy away from. The book also includes cartoon-like illustrations that will help the reader to picture how when certain things are said, how a person with autism comprehends what is said. very insightful book that can also be used for adults. This book has won several awards including the Foreword Reviews Book of the Year award and the Learning Magazine Teachers’ Choice Award for the Family.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dana Snyder

    This book is a guide to help children know how to talk with children with autism. The book helps to explain what is going on in the minds of people with autism , so that other people can get to know them. Just because they are different, doesn't mean that they don't long for friendship like all humans. This book not only helps children and adults to talk to autistic children but it also helps people to understand children with autism and how to befriend them. The author himself has autism and he This book is a guide to help children know how to talk with children with autism. The book helps to explain what is going on in the minds of people with autism , so that other people can get to know them. Just because they are different, doesn't mean that they don't long for friendship like all humans. This book not only helps children and adults to talk to autistic children but it also helps people to understand children with autism and how to befriend them. The author himself has autism and he relates various situations that he has experienced in hopes of helping other children feel comfortable about children with autism. The book goes into great detail about the things that bother autistic children, but it also talks about how their friends can redirect them when they are stuck on a topic of interest to them. So how does one talk to an autistic person; respectfully, compassionately, patiently, eagerly, helpfully and thoughtfully. Autistic children are no different than others, they want the same things in life; love, understanding, and acceptance. As a teacher, I will use this book to myself and others to better relate to individuals with autism.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Reader

    How to Talk to an Autistic Kid is a great resource for kids, teachers and parents! Author Daniel Stefanski is a real kid with autism, and he offers an easy to understand look into what makes autistic kids different (and the same!) as other kids. This book really does a great job at teaching acceptance and kindness by showing that more than anything, autistic kids just want to be treated like anyone else. Several short chapters talk about some of the differences you might notice when talking to c How to Talk to an Autistic Kid is a great resource for kids, teachers and parents! Author Daniel Stefanski is a real kid with autism, and he offers an easy to understand look into what makes autistic kids different (and the same!) as other kids. This book really does a great job at teaching acceptance and kindness by showing that more than anything, autistic kids just want to be treated like anyone else. Several short chapters talk about some of the differences you might notice when talking to children with autism (not understanding sarcasm or figures of speech, or not noticing body language) and offers tips for how you can help make the conversation easier. Stefanski uses honesty and a little humor to make his points, and the tone seems just right throughout the book. This book has a different feel to many of the other nonfiction offerings out there on autism because of Stefanski's personal experiences. ~s

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jamiesmilz

    I think this should be required reading for middle primary grades. 3/4 grade reading level, and written by a kid on the spectrum. There is a marked disdain for *different* that begins at that age level, and with so many more kids on the spectrum these days, might increase tolerance. It's too easy to assume that, because they struggle with social aspects, that they don't WANT friends. This young man explains that it is not that way at all, and gives great suggestions for *typical* kids on how to I think this should be required reading for middle primary grades. 3/4 grade reading level, and written by a kid on the spectrum. There is a marked disdain for *different* that begins at that age level, and with so many more kids on the spectrum these days, might increase tolerance. It's too easy to assume that, because they struggle with social aspects, that they don't WANT friends. This young man explains that it is not that way at all, and gives great suggestions for *typical* kids on how to talk to, befriend, kids on the spectrum.

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