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No Longer Human, Vol. 1

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In honor of the 100th birthday of Osamu Dazai, Usamaru Furuya retells Dazai's most important work No Longer Human in modern day Tokyo where modern vices can bring ruin to the self-loathing. Furuya's adaptation of No Longer Human takes place nearly seventy years after Dazai's original. Set in modern day Tokyo, Dazai's tale details the life of a young man originally from a we In honor of the 100th birthday of Osamu Dazai, Usamaru Furuya retells Dazai's most important work No Longer Human in modern day Tokyo where modern vices can bring ruin to the self-loathing. Furuya's adaptation of No Longer Human takes place nearly seventy years after Dazai's original. Set in modern day Tokyo, Dazai's tale details the life of a young man originally from a well-off family from Japan's far north. Yozo Oba is a troubled soul incapable of revealing his true self to others. A weak constitution and the lingering trauma from some abuse administered by a relative forces him to uphold a facade of hollow jocularity since high school. The series is composed of three parts, referred to in the novel as "memorandums," which chronicle the life of Oba from his teens to late twenties. The comic is narrated by the artist, Furuya himself, making appearances at the start of each volume. In many ways, it could be said that Furuya has traveled a path that may be similar to Dazai's. Maybe that is what led these two together after 100 years. In this first of three parts, alternative comic artist Usamaru Furuya appears to be overcome with deadlines. While he has been published by some of the biggest names in the comics industry, his star still shines brightest as a cult favorite, an underground artist whose emo comics are the voice of a new generation. To escape the duldrums of work, he loses himself in the internet and comes across the journal of a man whose life sounds very familiar--Oba Yozo. In Oba's First Memorandum the teen is overcome by an intense feeling of alienation. This pressure is so strong he cannot cope with others making it impossible to socialize with those who surround him, even his own family. To counter this Oba plays the role of the fool in order to establish interpersonal relationships.


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In honor of the 100th birthday of Osamu Dazai, Usamaru Furuya retells Dazai's most important work No Longer Human in modern day Tokyo where modern vices can bring ruin to the self-loathing. Furuya's adaptation of No Longer Human takes place nearly seventy years after Dazai's original. Set in modern day Tokyo, Dazai's tale details the life of a young man originally from a we In honor of the 100th birthday of Osamu Dazai, Usamaru Furuya retells Dazai's most important work No Longer Human in modern day Tokyo where modern vices can bring ruin to the self-loathing. Furuya's adaptation of No Longer Human takes place nearly seventy years after Dazai's original. Set in modern day Tokyo, Dazai's tale details the life of a young man originally from a well-off family from Japan's far north. Yozo Oba is a troubled soul incapable of revealing his true self to others. A weak constitution and the lingering trauma from some abuse administered by a relative forces him to uphold a facade of hollow jocularity since high school. The series is composed of three parts, referred to in the novel as "memorandums," which chronicle the life of Oba from his teens to late twenties. The comic is narrated by the artist, Furuya himself, making appearances at the start of each volume. In many ways, it could be said that Furuya has traveled a path that may be similar to Dazai's. Maybe that is what led these two together after 100 years. In this first of three parts, alternative comic artist Usamaru Furuya appears to be overcome with deadlines. While he has been published by some of the biggest names in the comics industry, his star still shines brightest as a cult favorite, an underground artist whose emo comics are the voice of a new generation. To escape the duldrums of work, he loses himself in the internet and comes across the journal of a man whose life sounds very familiar--Oba Yozo. In Oba's First Memorandum the teen is overcome by an intense feeling of alienation. This pressure is so strong he cannot cope with others making it impossible to socialize with those who surround him, even his own family. To counter this Oba plays the role of the fool in order to establish interpersonal relationships.

30 review for No Longer Human, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jen/The Tolkien Gal/ジェニファー

    This is probably the most horrific, upsetting manga I've ever read. I'm going to take some time to digest this. I'm preparing to listen to the original book, but I've heard that is even bleaker. Anyone who struggles with depression, especially chronic depression, can relate to this. I wouldn't advise you read this if you are feeling incredibly depressed, however. I truly haven't felt so understood by art before. It's incredibly sad that the author had to go through this, but at the same time, ni This is probably the most horrific, upsetting manga I've ever read. I'm going to take some time to digest this. I'm preparing to listen to the original book, but I've heard that is even bleaker. Anyone who struggles with depression, especially chronic depression, can relate to this. I wouldn't advise you read this if you are feeling incredibly depressed, however. I truly haven't felt so understood by art before. It's incredibly sad that the author had to go through this, but at the same time, nice to be reminded that you're not alone. There's also a Junji Ito version of this which I'm looking forward to reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    Strangely superficial, contrived, sensationalized story about the rather complex topics of alienation, depression, and extremism. And yet... stuff happens, you know, and somehow I want to know what happens next. Go figure. 2.5 stars if I could.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tatsuhiro Sato

    5 Stars Some books are only to be self-read and experienced, no amount of word could ever review or explain their significance, this is one of those masterpiece.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kesa

    just read it. a freakin masterpiece

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tosh

    It has been a Usamaru Furuya month for me, since I read "Lychee Light Club early this month. And I liked it a lot - but this is really my cup of sake. "No Longer Human" is a classic and great Osamu Dazai novel, and Furuya does a good job in updating the story (slightly). A story of a wealthy young teenager who had everything but quickly loses it due to feelings of severe alienation. Yes, it could be a Who rock opera concept, but in the hands of Dazai its a poetic downsizing of a character slowly It has been a Usamaru Furuya month for me, since I read "Lychee Light Club early this month. And I liked it a lot - but this is really my cup of sake. "No Longer Human" is a classic and great Osamu Dazai novel, and Furuya does a good job in updating the story (slightly). A story of a wealthy young teenager who had everything but quickly loses it due to feelings of severe alienation. Yes, it could be a Who rock opera concept, but in the hands of Dazai its a poetic downsizing of a character slowly losing his sense of identity. His only hope really is becoming a writer. And the book (and graphic novel) is based on Dazai's personal life. I discovered this writer while living in Japan, and at the time (and still does to be honest) makes perfect sense to me. Whenever I write something I think of him first. And its interesting Furuya has taken on this novel as a graphic piece of narration. His work is super great and sophisticated. His "No Longer Human" is a three part series. I can't wait till volume 2.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "Perhaps ultimately it was my nature to sabotage myself no matter where I was." "To other men, a woman I care for... is a 'sadsack girl' not even worth kissing..." "'You mean it? You really mean it? You would die with me? You're the first person who's ever said that to me.' "Dying without registering what it meant seemed like an excellent idea. The notion of a 'double suicide' even cheered up the both of us." It's startling how long it took me to get 'round to Usamaru Furuya's adaptation of Osamu Da "Perhaps ultimately it was my nature to sabotage myself no matter where I was." "To other men, a woman I care for... is a 'sadsack girl' not even worth kissing..." "'You mean it? You really mean it? You would die with me? You're the first person who's ever said that to me.' "Dying without registering what it meant seemed like an excellent idea. The notion of a 'double suicide' even cheered up the both of us." It's startling how long it took me to get 'round to Usamaru Furuya's adaptation of Osamu Dazai's No Longer Human. I think I've been conscious of this manga for about as long as I've been of Dazai's masterwork, if not a little longer: I recall learning of Furuya's manga in a quest to read more of the works published by Vertical, after having discovered Osamu Tezuka's Ode to Kirihito and Buddha when my public library restructured itself a little and moved all the "mature" manga into its own section among the science fiction novels (previously, mature manga and Western graphic novels were interspersed with general prose fiction, not remotely grouped together). As a high school student, I did not have a job (I didn't feel the need for one) and so had no money on my own, but I always planned on eventually buying some things published by Vertical, as well as other "mature" manga published from other companies. At the risk of getting off-topic, I remember finding a wealth of Hideshi Hino and Kazuo Umezu horror manga (mostly out-of-print today, it seems), and branching further into fantasies of buying other horror works, Reiko the Zombie Shop and Lychee Light Club, the latter of which I just learned today was done by the same artist as this adaptation of No Longer Human. My point is that I wasted about a decade not reading Furuya's manga, and now all the volumes are out of print and reaching prices in the triple-digits! But that's all hardly important. Dazai's No Longer Human holds the maybe-less-than-admirable distinction of being one of my personal favorite novels. I've read it quite a few times. I've last re-read it a couple weeks ago, and between reading this manga volume and awaiting delivery of Junji Ito's own manga adaptation, I really want to read it again rather soon. It's just a terribly fun book, for reasons many people would probably not consider it to be "fun." And so, bored at work, as I often am, and having not touched my copy of The Book of Disquiet in about nine months because it did not sit well with my being bored at work (it made things harder to stomach), I sought a small outlet to magnify my personal disdain, as is my wont, because I'm hardly a complete person and have never really learned how to fluff myself up and appear "whole," and so practically get off on Dazai's oeuvre, I decided it would be a cute diversion to give Furuya's manga a glance (it's a slow day at work anyway). First, this is clearly more intended to be a "reimagining" of the novel than a straightforward adaptation. Everything is modernized to the twenty-first century. This, I think, ruins an important theme to the original novel, having been published some years after we (America) fucked Japan in the ass in WWII, where we might imagine the character Yozo's inability to connect with other humans might act as a distillation of the nation of Japan as a whole, displaced from history, "disqualified" (to better translate the novel's title) from being a superpower after the West clipped their balls and forbade them from ever again having a real standing army. I suppose we can argue that Yozo's story is timeless (a sentiment with which I would certainly agree) and so it does not need the political backdrop. Anyway, the main changes are that Yozo's story was published as an online blog, seemingly by the man himself (very different from the novel having him leave some notebooks with a friend who later gives them to a curious author), and the blog is discovered by a young manga-ka (Furuya?) looking for a story for his next work. The beginning of this frame-story is roughly the same as Dazai's original: our unnamed narrator sees the three disparate photos of Yozo in different times of his life (childhood, high school, and his mid-20s), and he is compelled to read Yozo's life story because of the apparently missing links between the goofy child with a fake smile, the handsome and dignified-looking teenage student, and the withered old man who is actually only 25. Usamaru Furuya then proceeds to entirely omit the novel's "First Notebook," chronicling Yozo's childhood, jumping instead to his teenage years, skipping over the character of Takeichi in order to hasten the introduction of Horiki, a plot-critical character for the bulk of Yozo's story, who is made either to be a high school student now, or otherwise Yozo is taking extracurricular painting classes alongside his basic studies (but either way it's a change from the novel). From here, the manga follows the novel somewhat more closely, expanding a bit on the political activism (not explicitly branded "communist," likely due to the Party's irrelevance in this more-modern setting) to eat up some page-count before getting to a climax with the attempted shinjuu (an aside: I should probably be fired for how often I've googled "shinjuu" at work to double-check the spelling). While it is unfortunate Furuya limits the First Notebook's events to flashbacks, he does well with their use. Yozo gets a startling flashback to the time Takeichi prophesied his troubles with women while mid-coitus. He gets another regarding his father while staring into space at a socialist meeting. This latter is most significant as it compiles all the bits about Yozo's relationship with his father into a condensed sequence of a few pages, jamming everything together to highlight Yozo's filial anxiety, and better establishing the Kafkalike (fuck you, I refuse to say "Kafkaesque!) theme of the burden/pressure of being a son, an undercurrent charging the energy of Dazai's novel, but which often feels inconsequential when referenced between the story's very beginning and very end (the singular "fault" of the novel). There is also a curious twist by which Yozo's resentment toward his father is brought up while on the verge of drowning in the river ("Dad... your plaything... just broke..."). It stuns me that I cannot recall the novel so clearly now, after having read it so often, and having last read it a couple weeks ago, but I cannot immediately recall Yozo seeing his suicide attempt as rebellion against his father, only that his survival brought him greater shame and I believe led to his being disowned (which happens earlier in this manga). It's not exactly relevant to my appraisal of the overall quality of this volume, but there's a lot of somewhat graphic sex here and I was reading it at work, which was just absolutely hilarious to me. A surprising amount of cunnilingus! Dicks are censored, of course. Cunts aren't seen in too close a view, but have pubic hair blocking anything more notable. Classic Japan. I've written too much on the subject of what Furuya does with the story as opposed to Dazai's original, but the most important contribution is Furuya's art. To me, the purpose of any given artistic medium is to play into the strengths of that very medium. Dazai must do what can only be best performed in prose. Furuya's chosen form allows for flourish in illustration. He does wonders with this. Yozo's idea of "clowning" is evolved into a concept of a clown-puppet and there are times when Yozo's fear of humans + personal shame + detachment activate a portrayal of Yozo as ball-jointed marionette, complete with strings stretching from his wrists and elbows and shoulders up into the black nothingness above him. There are times when his eyes are shown completely white, as if unpainted. Or hollow, with no eye-ball whatsoever, as when we see the clown-puppet breaking apart underwater during the suicide attempt. There are also a couple choice panels where we see humans from Yozo's perspective, with faces contorted like the classic Munch painting. And while Dazai's novel spent a good amount of time discussing Yozo's childhood paintings of the horrors he sees in mankind, Furuya limits these illustrations to a single example: Yozo's interpretation of his father's face. (It's quite odd and unsettling to have written so much about this volume when I kinda-sorta refuse to review the novel proper. I think my belief is that I hold Dazai's opus in such high esteem that my filthy words can only sully its holiness.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    voiceofmadness

    A disturbing trilogy that follows a young man who cannot feel empathy. He struggles with connecting to people and forming lasting bonds. The main character uses women throughout the story in order to survive. Ultimately, things always fall apart because of his inability to feel empathy, accompanied by his own ego. Everything revolves around him, instead of the others in his life who are effected by the bad choices he makes. He just gives up and moves on when things get hard or uncomfortable. It' A disturbing trilogy that follows a young man who cannot feel empathy. He struggles with connecting to people and forming lasting bonds. The main character uses women throughout the story in order to survive. Ultimately, things always fall apart because of his inability to feel empathy, accompanied by his own ego. Everything revolves around him, instead of the others in his life who are effected by the bad choices he makes. He just gives up and moves on when things get hard or uncomfortable. It's a frighting tale because I feel that it ultimately serves as a warning to others, to not follow his path and to be kind to those who help you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I'm really not much of a manga reader, but the plot sounded interesting. It was ok I guess, but the character despondency and general sociopathology left me not really giving a shit. I don't have it in me to appreciate this particular personality type in a character or a person therefore the low rating. All around not my kind of book. Maybe someone that can relate may enjoy this. I'm really not much of a manga reader, but the plot sounded interesting. It was ok I guess, but the character despondency and general sociopathology left me not really giving a shit. I don't have it in me to appreciate this particular personality type in a character or a person therefore the low rating. All around not my kind of book. Maybe someone that can relate may enjoy this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kingston Lor

    MUST-READ, manga which is modernly adapted which depicts the story of osamu dazai - such a tragic story of a life lived of questioning himself, what does it truly mean to be human? Human nature itself is ugly, disgusting, cruel - these are one of the aspects this manga adaptation explores. A very gripping story that is only 3 volumes, i recommend this very depressing story to others.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecka2

    Actual rating: 4,5 Probably THE darkest, scariest and most depressive manga I've ever read. Superb artwork that hits you like a brass knuckle, especially the ones where he is portrayed with marionette strings. Very thought provoking. It definitely stands out from other manga series, even among the dark ones. I'm curious to read the novel by Osamu Dazu and see if this adaption does it justice. Actual rating: 4,5 Probably THE darkest, scariest and most depressive manga I've ever read. Superb artwork that hits you like a brass knuckle, especially the ones where he is portrayed with marionette strings. Very thought provoking. It definitely stands out from other manga series, even among the dark ones. I'm curious to read the novel by Osamu Dazu and see if this adaption does it justice.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    Well-written (& illustrated), just...not to my tastes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    LG (A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions)

    This is technically the first volume of a manga adaptation of Osamu Dazai’s No Longer Human. However, in reality it’s more like a work inspired by Osamu Dazai’s No Longer Human. It has a lot of the same characters and a lot of the same events, but also enough important changes that the impact of certain familiar scenes and characters is completely different. I’m not sure how I feel about that. The volume begins with Usamaru Furuya as a character in his own manga. He’s trying, and failing, to thin This is technically the first volume of a manga adaptation of Osamu Dazai’s No Longer Human. However, in reality it’s more like a work inspired by Osamu Dazai’s No Longer Human. It has a lot of the same characters and a lot of the same events, but also enough important changes that the impact of certain familiar scenes and characters is completely different. I’m not sure how I feel about that. The volume begins with Usamaru Furuya as a character in his own manga. He’s trying, and failing, to think up an idea for his next serial when he suddenly gets an anonymous email pointing him to an online “ouch diary.” The website contains three images: one of 6-year-old Yozo posing with his family while wearing a wide fake smile; one of Yozo at age 25, his expression lifeless and worn down; and one of Yozo at age 17, cool and handsome. Furuya proceeds to read the diary that goes with those images, to learn how Yozo fell so far so quickly. Then readers get the story of Yozo’s life, starting with a few pages showing him as a child and middle school student, behaving like a class clown in order to get people to like him. The story quickly progresses into Yozo’s high school years, when he is befriended by Horiki, who Yozo believes is truly what he has spent his life pretending to be, a friendly and shiftless clown. Although Yozo starts off with everything in life handed to him on a silver platter, things rapidly fall apart, and the volume ends with Yozo’s first suicide attempt (I’m assuming the manga will include the next one). When I reviewed Osamu Dazai’s No Longer Human, I said that the beginning of the book, which dealt with Yozo’s childhood, worked best for me. Furuya opted to either skip most of that or include it as vague flashbacks. I thought, at first, that I’d be okay with this, until I realized that it really changed the overall tone. In the book, Yozo started off as a child who couldn’t empathize with others, had trouble figuring out what other people were thinking and why they acted the way they acted the way they did, and was terrified that people would see through his desperate attempts to fit in. The manga wasn’t as successful at setting the stage, and so high school Yozo was even more insufferable. Readers basically only saw Yozo at his absolute worst, looking down on everyone around him, drinking, skipping class, and paying for sex and doing his very best to not get to know the women he had sex with as actual people. A few things I should add, at this point. First, Furuya aged Yozo down a bit. I don’t think Yozo met Horiki until college in the book, whereas in the manga they became friends during high school (with Yozo, the word "friend" can be assumed to mean nothing more than "acquaintance with whom he spends time"). Also, unlike the book, which alluded to sex but never mentioned anything in detail, there is quite a bit of on-page sex in the manga. One scene in particular did a good job of getting across the kind of guy Yozo was: he found himself distracted by thoughts of something a friend from school told him while he was having sex with a girl who’d just told him she wanted him to be her boyfriend. Then he couldn’t understand why she was so upset with him. I don’t know that the other sex scenes (four, total) were strictly necessary, though. Now, back to the story/character changes. Another thing Furuya did was add a bit more to the plot. In the book, Yozo hung out with Marxists and took part in meaningless (to him) meetings and activities. The work annoyed him, but he stayed with the group because he couldn’t quite figure out how to leave and because others expected him to do things. In the manga, Yozo actually kind of liked being involved with the Japan United Labor Association, although he looked down on its members. He gradually realized that they were(view spoiler)[planning terrorist activities, and he might have become even further involved if it hadn’t been for an incident involving a jealous boyfriend. (hide spoiler)] Furuya also ascribed emotions to Yozo that I’m not really sure he actually felt in the original book. For example, in the manga Yozo indicated that he actually cared about Ageha (I can’t remember if that was her name in the novel, too). I don’t know that the Yozo of the original novel truly cared about a single person, especially enough to admit it to himself. He cared about how people made him see himself, and that was pretty much it. This was a funhouse mirror sort of adaptation, although the end result was still largely “miserable people doing self-destructive things." I’ll read the next volume because I already have it on hand, but I doubt I’ll be putting in an ILL request for the third and final volume. (Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fuego

    I really liked Osamu Dazai's "No Longer Human," but I didn't like its manga adaptation. Is it truly an adaptation or just an inspired work? I really felt the struggle, the depression, the torment of being a human being in the book, but I didn't feel anything here. The storyline of the manga was contrived, superficial, and forced. Why did Furuya leave out the Yozo's childhood part? It played a very important role in the book. The modern-day setting was a huge turn-off for me. I felt like the 17-ye I really liked Osamu Dazai's "No Longer Human," but I didn't like its manga adaptation. Is it truly an adaptation or just an inspired work? I really felt the struggle, the depression, the torment of being a human being in the book, but I didn't feel anything here. The storyline of the manga was contrived, superficial, and forced. Why did Furuya leave out the Yozo's childhood part? It played a very important role in the book. The modern-day setting was a huge turn-off for me. I felt like the 17-year-old Yozo was just a super-duper wealthy teenager who was so bored with his life he wanted to fool around with it, to believe he was different. Pretentiously abnormal. We readers were presented with a number of his supposed-to-be-poignant thoughts. Ok, I get it. He was no ordinary human like others, or so he thought, but I just couldn't sympathize with him, at all. Also, why were there several sex scenes? Yikes! Is it really necessary? I know there was sex in the book, but it neither was over the top nor drove me to distraction. When I took a look at the price of the first volume on Amazon and realized a used one was worth at least a few dozen euros, I was expecting it to be (extremely) good. But after finishing the first volume, I just wanted to tell Furuya's Yozo: "Get your sh*t together, mate."

  14. 5 out of 5

    ayanami

    This is a pretty solid volume about a depressed teen who feels alienated from the world and believes that he needs to play a role in order to fit in (hello, younger me). I totally related to the main character's feelings of not understanding other people and his whole existential crisis. The story is fast-paced with some intense moments, and the art does what it needs to do. I do feel that everything goes by pretty quickly, I would have liked to delve further into the protagonist's head, as dark This is a pretty solid volume about a depressed teen who feels alienated from the world and believes that he needs to play a role in order to fit in (hello, younger me). I totally related to the main character's feelings of not understanding other people and his whole existential crisis. The story is fast-paced with some intense moments, and the art does what it needs to do. I do feel that everything goes by pretty quickly, I would have liked to delve further into the protagonist's head, as dark a place it would have been... but I would probably have to read Dazai's original work for that (actually, the reason I picked this one up was because I was already interested in the original novel).

  15. 4 out of 5

    typewriterdeluxe

    I know that writing likeable characters isn't always a requirement for making good art, but No Longer Human Volume 1 rubbed me the wrong way. I felt as detached reading it as Yozo Oba feels about humanity and living, which made it difficult to keep turning pages. The art is well done, the story just isn't to my taste. Since this is Usamaru Furuya's manga adaption of No Longer Human by Osamu Dozai, it made me wonder how this modernized version (2009) is different from or the same as the 1948 nove I know that writing likeable characters isn't always a requirement for making good art, but No Longer Human Volume 1 rubbed me the wrong way. I felt as detached reading it as Yozo Oba feels about humanity and living, which made it difficult to keep turning pages. The art is well done, the story just isn't to my taste. Since this is Usamaru Furuya's manga adaption of No Longer Human by Osamu Dozai, it made me wonder how this modernized version (2009) is different from or the same as the 1948 novel.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

    I ordered this from the library because our system doesn't have a copy of the original book, No Longer Human by Osamu Dazai. While I'm generally a huge fan of graphic novels & manga, I can't help but feel this version is doing the original story a disservice. The illustrations and layout are fine, but the dialogue and the pacing feel ...off. Like how the lyrics of Kidz Bop songs are a childish echo of their counterparts. So imagine an extremely R-Rated Kidz Bop song. I ordered this from the library because our system doesn't have a copy of the original book, No Longer Human by Osamu Dazai. While I'm generally a huge fan of graphic novels & manga, I can't help but feel this version is doing the original story a disservice. The illustrations and layout are fine, but the dialogue and the pacing feel ...off. Like how the lyrics of Kidz Bop songs are a childish echo of their counterparts. So imagine an extremely R-Rated Kidz Bop song.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rut Mandiola

    Great adaptation from original material of Dazai, but not my favorite manga adaptation of this story. If your sensitive/depressive don't read this, the topic in this manga are so sensitive, only adults. Great adaptation from original material of Dazai, but not my favorite manga adaptation of this story. If your sensitive/depressive don't read this, the topic in this manga are so sensitive, only adults.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dyslexic Bookmonster

    This is the kind of darkness that I thrive on.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shafin Haque

    I'd say this can be best enjoyed after reading the original novel :3 I'd say this can be best enjoyed after reading the original novel :3

  20. 4 out of 5

    Warren Tutwiler

    Good adaptation, but I liked Junji Ito's better. Good adaptation, but I liked Junji Ito's better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Quincy

    I read this when I was 11? I remember being very disturbed. It's good though. I read this when I was 11? I remember being very disturbed. It's good though.

  22. 4 out of 5

    howie lemonds

    the junji ito version goes much more in depth, but this is still a good version of the story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leander

    A better manga of the original novel, than the 2007 East Press version. It's a good book so far. Just might recommend 3.3/5. A better manga of the original novel, than the 2007 East Press version. It's a good book so far. Just might recommend 3.3/5.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miss Susan

    Interesting. So character relatability really isn't a requirement for a good novel. I was surprised at how engaged I was by this book despite the fact that I couldn't really relate to the protagonist who basically wanders around disengaged from the world while gradually giving up on trying to perform as a functioning person. I heard of No Longer Human from Book Girl and the Suicidal Mime and I think it did a much better job of taking the basic concept and crafting an engaging relatable character Interesting. So character relatability really isn't a requirement for a good novel. I was surprised at how engaged I was by this book despite the fact that I couldn't really relate to the protagonist who basically wanders around disengaged from the world while gradually giving up on trying to perform as a functioning person. I heard of No Longer Human from Book Girl and the Suicidal Mime and I think it did a much better job of taking the basic concept and crafting an engaging relatable character from it. 3 stars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Grayden

    Before reading the manga, I have actually watch the anime beforehand and I had a brief idea what's the whole story is about. However, I find that reading the manga is much more intense compared to the anime. I think this is because of the play of imagination in my head. I tried exploring different possibilities regarding the plot, setting, and characters. I kept asking myself questions like: What would have happen if he/she didn't do this? What if the events happen in other countries and not Japan? It Before reading the manga, I have actually watch the anime beforehand and I had a brief idea what's the whole story is about. However, I find that reading the manga is much more intense compared to the anime. I think this is because of the play of imagination in my head. I tried exploring different possibilities regarding the plot, setting, and characters. I kept asking myself questions like: What would have happen if he/she didn't do this? What if the events happen in other countries and not Japan? It is really good read and I am planning to read the novel next.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julie (Manga Maniac Cafe)

    Not sure how I feel about this one yet. I don't think I enjoyed it because I felt so disconnected from the characters. It is well-written and the art is crisp and clean, and I was never distracted from the story. I just don't think that I'm the audience for this series. Full review soon at www.mangamaniaccafe.com Not sure how I feel about this one yet. I don't think I enjoyed it because I felt so disconnected from the characters. It is well-written and the art is crisp and clean, and I was never distracted from the story. I just don't think that I'm the audience for this series. Full review soon at www.mangamaniaccafe.com

  27. 5 out of 5

    Russell Grant

    This is the first of three volumes and so far so good. It's pretty angst ridden, but the central character is messed up/interesting enough to hold your interest. the way this volume ends makes you want to continue as well. Art and presentation is typical of a Vertical Manga release, which means it's superb. This is the first of three volumes and so far so good. It's pretty angst ridden, but the central character is messed up/interesting enough to hold your interest. the way this volume ends makes you want to continue as well. Art and presentation is typical of a Vertical Manga release, which means it's superb.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Loletta

    It was okay. It was a present from a family member who thought it was the original book. Instead this is based on that text. I read with an open mind but it's quite a basic manga compared to some other stuff I have read. Though I can imagine a younger me enjoying this. Hinges on a lot of obvious stereotypes which often ruins the other good aspects about it for me. The art was okay too. It was okay. It was a present from a family member who thought it was the original book. Instead this is based on that text. I read with an open mind but it's quite a basic manga compared to some other stuff I have read. Though I can imagine a younger me enjoying this. Hinges on a lot of obvious stereotypes which often ruins the other good aspects about it for me. The art was okay too.

  29. 4 out of 5

    morbidflight

    Furuya Usamaru is one of my favorite mangaka, and his reimagining of No Longer Human is pretty excellent. I love the artistic decisions that went into this, especially the schoolchildren's faces--haunting. Furuya Usamaru is one of my favorite mangaka, and his reimagining of No Longer Human is pretty excellent. I love the artistic decisions that went into this, especially the schoolchildren's faces--haunting.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jasmiina F

    This is based on a book and now I'd like to read the book actually. This manga adaptation is great too. Quite sad story, but I like these sort of melancholy stories. Reminds me a bit about Dorian Gray. This is based on a book and now I'd like to read the book actually. This manga adaptation is great too. Quite sad story, but I like these sort of melancholy stories. Reminds me a bit about Dorian Gray.

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