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Touching Our Strength: The Erotic as Power and the Love of God

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A leading feminist theologian affirms the sacredness of mutually empowering relationships and sexual pleasure.


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A leading feminist theologian affirms the sacredness of mutually empowering relationships and sexual pleasure.

30 review for Touching Our Strength: The Erotic as Power and the Love of God

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jendi

    I'm all over the place with how to rate this book. It was quite validating to find someone else who envisioned an experience-based, collaborative, and evolving standard for religious authority. Heyward's exploration of mind-body splitting and anti-eroticism in Christianity helped me understand why my faith tradition has been so inconsistent in supporting sexual safety and consent. However, for me the book suffered from some common problems in 2nd Wave 1980s-90s feminism: value-laden male-female I'm all over the place with how to rate this book. It was quite validating to find someone else who envisioned an experience-based, collaborative, and evolving standard for religious authority. Heyward's exploration of mind-body splitting and anti-eroticism in Christianity helped me understand why my faith tradition has been so inconsistent in supporting sexual safety and consent. However, for me the book suffered from some common problems in 2nd Wave 1980s-90s feminism: value-laden male-female binaries, an imbalanced exaltation of "relational" over "individualist" ways of experiencing one's self, and inaccurately universalizing the male-on-female abuse pattern to all abusive relationships (or simply erasing the possibility that women ever abuse their female partners and children).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Sonell

    I highly recommend this book to everyone. Christian and non-christian, Women, NBs, & Men, Cis and Trans Folx, Asexual or Sexual Black, White, Red... This book by Episcopal Priest Carter Heyward is one of the best things I've read regarding mutually beneficial and positive relations. She talks about the erotic being the source of our strength, and not exclusively sexual eroticism, but the erotic as our desire for mutuality, touch, and time spent being present with the people in our lives. She talks I highly recommend this book to everyone. Christian and non-christian, Women, NBs, & Men, Cis and Trans Folx, Asexual or Sexual Black, White, Red... This book by Episcopal Priest Carter Heyward is one of the best things I've read regarding mutually beneficial and positive relations. She talks about the erotic being the source of our strength, and not exclusively sexual eroticism, but the erotic as our desire for mutuality, touch, and time spent being present with the people in our lives. She talks about how our culture alienates us from our bodies, our eroticism, our sensuality, and how justice is the presence of love in the world. But not just any justice, certainly not "legal justice" but Justice that draws people into right relation with one another. She tackles heterosexism, alienated power, and ends on a phenomenal examination of sexual ethics that despite her lack of knowledge regarding ace and trans folx mangages to be extremely inclusive and empowering.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Reminds me of process theology. A precursor of sorts to queer theology. I wanted to like this book more than I did. Her language is at times poetic, fluid, but does not quite pull off the energy and beauty characteristic of process thought. Really, though, one would read the book for her ideas on sexuality and the erotic. Here she offers a wonderful (although I find too totalizing), provocative enhancement and refiguring of the erotic's place in Christianity. Radical for the 1980s, and probably Reminds me of process theology. A precursor of sorts to queer theology. I wanted to like this book more than I did. Her language is at times poetic, fluid, but does not quite pull off the energy and beauty characteristic of process thought. Really, though, one would read the book for her ideas on sexuality and the erotic. Here she offers a wonderful (although I find too totalizing), provocative enhancement and refiguring of the erotic's place in Christianity. Radical for the 1980s, and probably even radical for today.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lynette

    Carter Heyward is a beautiful theologian and introduced me to many powerful thoughts.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Linda Ryan

  6. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Karr

  7. 5 out of 5

    janelle

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emelia

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steven Boggess

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  11. 5 out of 5

    Revhipchick

  12. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pat

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rick Edwards

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brian crisp

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lordcarlosrobert

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lillian

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian Adams-THies

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  21. 4 out of 5

    Delaney

  22. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shay Gabriel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Hansen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elisa

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ken Rowe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Hussain

  28. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Marbut

  29. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brett

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