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The Barnes & Noble Review Kevin J. Anderson's super-sized space opera, the Saga of Seven Suns, continues in Of Fire and Night, the fifth installment of the shelf-bending science fiction series that has been compared to Frank Herbert's Dune chronicles and Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy. Of Fire and Night begins with the all-out extermination of humankind looming. The Terr The Barnes & Noble Review Kevin J. Anderson's super-sized space opera, the Saga of Seven Suns, continues in Of Fire and Night, the fifth installment of the shelf-bending science fiction series that has been compared to Frank Herbert's Dune chronicles and Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy. Of Fire and Night begins with the all-out extermination of humankind looming. The Terran Hanseatic League's war with the hydrogues (aliens that live at the core of gas-giant planets) is going badly -- and, with a tyrannical leader like Basil Wenceslas, the situation is only getting worse, especially after he alienates all of the powerful aliens who might have helped the League. As these once-reliable allies secretly plot humankind's eradication with the hydrogues, entire factions of humanity are making plans for individual survival. At the same time, Soldier compies (competent computerized companions) have rebelled and taken most of Earth's military. With Armageddon imminent, does humankind have any chance of survival? When Anderson's Saga of Seven Suns (Scattered Suns, Horizon Storms, et al.) is eventually concluded -- a projected seven-volume story arc, according to the author's web site -- it will be remembered as one of the most ambitious science fiction narratives ever undertaken. Featuring numerous sentient alien races, complex political machinations, mind-blowing technological advances, and literally hundreds of integral characters, this apocalyptic series can be described properly in only word -- epic! (A word of advice to Seven Suns neophytes: This is definitely not a series where readers can just pick up any volume and dive in. Beginning with Book One, Hidden Empire, is highly recommended.) Paul Goat Allen


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The Barnes & Noble Review Kevin J. Anderson's super-sized space opera, the Saga of Seven Suns, continues in Of Fire and Night, the fifth installment of the shelf-bending science fiction series that has been compared to Frank Herbert's Dune chronicles and Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy. Of Fire and Night begins with the all-out extermination of humankind looming. The Terr The Barnes & Noble Review Kevin J. Anderson's super-sized space opera, the Saga of Seven Suns, continues in Of Fire and Night, the fifth installment of the shelf-bending science fiction series that has been compared to Frank Herbert's Dune chronicles and Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy. Of Fire and Night begins with the all-out extermination of humankind looming. The Terran Hanseatic League's war with the hydrogues (aliens that live at the core of gas-giant planets) is going badly -- and, with a tyrannical leader like Basil Wenceslas, the situation is only getting worse, especially after he alienates all of the powerful aliens who might have helped the League. As these once-reliable allies secretly plot humankind's eradication with the hydrogues, entire factions of humanity are making plans for individual survival. At the same time, Soldier compies (competent computerized companions) have rebelled and taken most of Earth's military. With Armageddon imminent, does humankind have any chance of survival? When Anderson's Saga of Seven Suns (Scattered Suns, Horizon Storms, et al.) is eventually concluded -- a projected seven-volume story arc, according to the author's web site -- it will be remembered as one of the most ambitious science fiction narratives ever undertaken. Featuring numerous sentient alien races, complex political machinations, mind-blowing technological advances, and literally hundreds of integral characters, this apocalyptic series can be described properly in only word -- epic! (A word of advice to Seven Suns neophytes: This is definitely not a series where readers can just pick up any volume and dive in. Beginning with Book One, Hidden Empire, is highly recommended.) Paul Goat Allen

30 review for Of Fire and Night

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aqiul Colombowala

    After being bummed by book 3 and 4 which were very slow, book 5 is surprisingly good! Shorter than the earlier book and paced much faster, the action has finally unfolded across the spiral arm. A great showdown between all the races is in the works and humanity is clinging on just barely! All the major races have their forces pitted for a fierce battle. I love the Wentals, they are extremely powerful yet really dumb at the same time. I wish some of the battle scenes had been explained in more det After being bummed by book 3 and 4 which were very slow, book 5 is surprisingly good! Shorter than the earlier book and paced much faster, the action has finally unfolded across the spiral arm. A great showdown between all the races is in the works and humanity is clinging on just barely! All the major races have their forces pitted for a fierce battle. I love the Wentals, they are extremely powerful yet really dumb at the same time. I wish some of the battle scenes had been explained in more detail. One of the key things missing in this series has been detailed space battles. A major battle is usually resolved in a few pages where it could have been explained in detail and had a more profound effect on the reader. Previously annoying characters have become even more oblivious and annoying and some lesser explored characters have shown great promise. They might finally become interesting in the remaining two books. At the end of book 4 I had decided that if book 5 was going to be slow as well, I'd give up on the series. Now though I feel I can definitely read this series to its conclusion!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Johnson

    this was one of the best books in this series. i thought the plot twists and new characters and threads were very entertaining. i think that you need to read KJA's books with the intention of being entertained and not necessarily impressed with his writing (although i think he's a very good writer). i thought the ending was fantastic. HUGE cliffhanger. it really made me long for the next book. this was one of the best books in this series. i thought the plot twists and new characters and threads were very entertaining. i think that you need to read KJA's books with the intention of being entertained and not necessarily impressed with his writing (although i think he's a very good writer). i thought the ending was fantastic. HUGE cliffhanger. it really made me long for the next book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This is great science fiction - excellent character development, complex story arcs and just pure excitement to read. I'm glad I got into the Saga of Seven Suns series after 5 of them had been published as it would have killed me to have to wait long periods in between publishing each book. This is great science fiction - excellent character development, complex story arcs and just pure excitement to read. I'm glad I got into the Saga of Seven Suns series after 5 of them had been published as it would have killed me to have to wait long periods in between publishing each book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

    Coming into a series near the end is never a good thing, but it does give one a unique perspective. When I first starting reading this book, I was completely confused. Even the author’s “The Story So Far” prologue did not help. But my initial confusion soon gave way to enlightenment. Anderson’s character development and world creation are so good that you lose yourself in the story without really knowing – or even really caring – what has happened so far. With each chapter devoted to a different Coming into a series near the end is never a good thing, but it does give one a unique perspective. When I first starting reading this book, I was completely confused. Even the author’s “The Story So Far” prologue did not help. But my initial confusion soon gave way to enlightenment. Anderson’s character development and world creation are so good that you lose yourself in the story without really knowing – or even really caring – what has happened so far. With each chapter devoted to a different set of characters – and there are a lot of them – you would think you’d forget what was going on by the time you cycle back around, but within a sentence or two, you know exactly where you are and what is going on. If I were to map out the plot and subplots with colored pens, there would be a myriad of colors all intertwining. To give specific character information in this review would be too involved for this short space. Essentially, the story is about many worlds and as many sentient beings uniting to fight a common enemy – the hydrogues. But within the alliances lie deceit and betrayal as different factions attempt to further their own interests. Case in point, you have the Ildirans, led by Jora’h, supposedly aligning with the hydrogues. Jora’h must agree to help destroy humans or risk being destroyed. He has nothing against humans, but the ultimatum has been issued. But then there are the Theroc’s with their world trees, the water entity wentals, the Roamers, and several other factions who are aligning against the hydrogues. They don’t necessarily like the humans, but we’re better than the hydrogues. Oh, and don’t forget the rampaging compies – computerized robot armies in revolt. There is a lot going on in this book. If you enjoy lengthy space sagas, this would be a good book to pick up, but I strongly urge you to read the previous four first. It’s not absolutely necessary, but would probably be helpful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Clay

    This is where the stuff hits the fans right from the get-go. The Klikiss robot's plot to sabotage and convert the Soldier Compys of the Earth Defense Force has been triggered and the first half of the book follows those battle fronts. At the same time, the Mage-Imperator has made contact with the Hydrogues who give him an impossible choice. The King and Hansa Chairman reach a critical point in their relationship as the Roamers start trade relations with abandoned Hansa colony planets. Plus, the This is where the stuff hits the fans right from the get-go. The Klikiss robot's plot to sabotage and convert the Soldier Compys of the Earth Defense Force has been triggered and the first half of the book follows those battle fronts. At the same time, the Mage-Imperator has made contact with the Hydrogues who give him an impossible choice. The King and Hansa Chairman reach a critical point in their relationship as the Roamers start trade relations with abandoned Hansa colony planets. Plus, the Roamers, wentals and worldforest are all trying to pull together a definitive attack plan. While one major plotline of the series seems to come to a close, another obvious one is introduced that will redefine the shape of the political map within the Spiral Arm. However, that's not enough to fill out the remaining two books in the series. The seed for a new enemy to the galaxy's inhabitants was planted in the previous volume by Anderson. Though I had some suspicion that this force might become a problem, the instigator of the coming conflict was not anyone I expected. And, just to make things interesting, Anderson also springs a completely different threat that will want to reclaim what has been lost. I found this book to be a real-page turner as the battles with the turned Soldier Compys on several different fronts unfolded. The other major and minor plot threads and characters that are featured held my interest through to the end. One event that I had been hoping to see happen, since the first volume, comes so close to being carried out and then is frustratingly foiled. However, the aftermath of that promises to set up a more interesting and satisfying confrontation.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Evans

    I already knew Kevin had a hand in creating the Star Wars Killik's, so their similarities to the Klikiss is understandable, but I had to check to see if Kevin Anderson had a hand in writing Mass Effect 3 after this (he didn't). (view spoiler)[ Sooo, didn't expect the primary plot to come to a conclusion this soon, especially knowing there are more books. While the climax was satisfying, the war it's self came across a little anti-climactic. It felt like they'd just finished setting up the conflict I already knew Kevin had a hand in creating the Star Wars Killik's, so their similarities to the Klikiss is understandable, but I had to check to see if Kevin Anderson had a hand in writing Mass Effect 3 after this (he didn't). (view spoiler)[ Sooo, didn't expect the primary plot to come to a conclusion this soon, especially knowing there are more books. While the climax was satisfying, the war it's self came across a little anti-climactic. It felt like they'd just finished setting up the conflicts in the last book and this book they not only start fighting back, but win immediately. :/ I had been expecting an actual war, not just one climactic fight. oh well. (hide spoiler)] Over all a solid story. Kevin Anderson is a good writer, and can do some great things with the worlds he's given, but his own world building skills aren't that good. He's exactly the kind of author you'd want to work on a pre-existing property like Star Wars, but also why he struggles on his own original IP. This is exactly the opposite problem Anne McCaffrey had. Wish authors like this could team up. A Kevin Anderson Pern book would be awesome.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris Harris

    One of the greatest sci-fi novels I have ever read. I would recommend to anyone, let alone readers of science fiction novels. The conclusion is possible the greatest sci-fi "war sequence" I have ever read, bringing together every single plot thread of the book. One of the greatest sci-fi novels I have ever read. I would recommend to anyone, let alone readers of science fiction novels. The conclusion is possible the greatest sci-fi "war sequence" I have ever read, bringing together every single plot thread of the book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gene Parish

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I recently listened to Of Fire and Night written by Kevin J. Anderson and narrated by David Colacci. Before I begin this review I need to mention that this book is part of the Saga of Seven Suns series. As it's almost impossible to review a book in a series without a few spoilers as to what came before. This is the obligatory warning. If you are averse to any spoilers, stop reading. Earth stands at the brink in this latest book. Due to a lack of manpower earth has now staffed its fleet heavily wit I recently listened to Of Fire and Night written by Kevin J. Anderson and narrated by David Colacci. Before I begin this review I need to mention that this book is part of the Saga of Seven Suns series. As it's almost impossible to review a book in a series without a few spoilers as to what came before. This is the obligatory warning. If you are averse to any spoilers, stop reading. Earth stands at the brink in this latest book. Due to a lack of manpower earth has now staffed its fleet heavily with soldier compies. Unbeknownst to the humans, the Klikiss robots have long since subverted their programming and they wait only on a signal to rise up against the Hansa. Only King Peter has warned of this disaster, but still none listen. The Ildirans have, thanks to their breeding program, renewed talks with the deadly Hydrogues. If the talks should fail all Ildirans may perish. Forgotten by most, a new alliance builds on Theron betwixt the world forest, the roamers, and the Wentils, beings of elemental water. They are planning to wipe out the Hydrogues before the gaseous species can strike again. David Colacci is faced with the task of narrating a huge cast amid a wide variety of galaxy shaping events. He generally pulls this off, despite the complexity of the task. While dry in certain parts, he generally captures the emotions of the tale. Conclusion: This is the fifth book in the Seven Suns Saga. The previous two books were a bit slow and plodding, however, this one really takes off. If you can make it this far in the Saga, I think you will find this book satisfying.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Across multiple light years and empires, humans and several other species negotiate, argue, and fight to hold onto their little pieces of the universe. Read this series from the beginning because it is so full of characters and locations that it will be difficult to understand backstories otherwise. This is the 5th book in this far-flung space opera series. First, it’s better than book 4 so if you are bogged down in the series, take heart. Second, a lot happens in this book, and a lot of loose e Across multiple light years and empires, humans and several other species negotiate, argue, and fight to hold onto their little pieces of the universe. Read this series from the beginning because it is so full of characters and locations that it will be difficult to understand backstories otherwise. This is the 5th book in this far-flung space opera series. First, it’s better than book 4 so if you are bogged down in the series, take heart. Second, a lot happens in this book, and a lot of loose ends are tied up. Third, remember there is a glossary at the end of the book. In fact, read the glossary before starting the book to refresh your memory of Tasia, King Peter, Queen Esterra, Jess and Cesca, Robb Brindle, and the always wonderful Rlinda and BeBob.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Hall

    Man these books are turning into a struggle. They jump around so much and there are no main characters. Half of every chapter is a recap of the last time we were with that character (which is necessary because there are so many characters). The one good thing I can say is that I am genuinely interested in how this all ends. It's just that I don't have the time to dedicate to reading this story. Luckily, it's possible to pick up any book in this series and start reading because everything is reca Man these books are turning into a struggle. They jump around so much and there are no main characters. Half of every chapter is a recap of the last time we were with that character (which is necessary because there are so many characters). The one good thing I can say is that I am genuinely interested in how this all ends. It's just that I don't have the time to dedicate to reading this story. Luckily, it's possible to pick up any book in this series and start reading because everything is recapped each chapter. Someday I will finish but it is not this day.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gregg Buford

    The Hansa is still in control of the chairman Basil a character I just hate really. People on Earth seem like they are just the most arrogant and naive humans in these books still. Surprised at some things that happened with the Idirans and the Therons. Everything thing else was more or less the same with the other books in the series. The last thing that happened in the book was a surprise and wonder how they will deal with this new threat.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Philip Chaston

    There are space operas and there is pulp. Doesn't make the book less readable, but elementals, psychic powers, a landscape of monolithic empires, monarchies, aliens with weird foreheads and plucky traders does remind of stories and tv shows from the 50s and 60s. Given the level of incompetence shown by the human authorities, it is remarkable that they did survive. Sci fi as conservative comfort blanket There are space operas and there is pulp. Doesn't make the book less readable, but elementals, psychic powers, a landscape of monolithic empires, monarchies, aliens with weird foreheads and plucky traders does remind of stories and tv shows from the 50s and 60s. Given the level of incompetence shown by the human authorities, it is remarkable that they did survive. Sci fi as conservative comfort blanket

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marc Diepstraten

    I like this serie. But there are lots of characters to keep track of, allthough to be honest not all make it to the end of the book. Many storylines which all run over all book. The introduction into what happened previously is mandatory for me, just to catch up. Non-stop action throughout. Recommended if big space opera is your thing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    A real page-turner! Anderson advances and ties up several storylines very nicely, while setting up new conflicts to carry through top the last 2 books. I did not see the last few pages coming, though I probably should have. Very enjoyable. 4 stars.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jarrell

    KJA hit yet another one out of the park with this one! Each novel in the series outdoes the ones before and "Of Fire And Night" is no exception. If you like wide ranging space opera with and engaging, and expanding story then this is the series for you! I can't wait to read the next one! KJA hit yet another one out of the park with this one! Each novel in the series outdoes the ones before and "Of Fire And Night" is no exception. If you like wide ranging space opera with and engaging, and expanding story then this is the series for you! I can't wait to read the next one!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    2.5 rounded up. These just seem to get more mediocre as they go. The chairman character in particular is just laughably bad at this point. There is just enough interest to keep going in audio, but I sure wouldn't be reading these on paper. 2.5 rounded up. These just seem to get more mediocre as they go. The chairman character in particular is just laughably bad at this point. There is just enough interest to keep going in audio, but I sure wouldn't be reading these on paper.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Thomas

    Kevin Anderson is such a vivid writer. It doesn't matter which of his books you read, he is entertaining. The Saga of the Seven Suns is a massive investment, but well worth it if you like science fiction. I am looking forward to the n st few books. Kevin Anderson is such a vivid writer. It doesn't matter which of his books you read, he is entertaining. The Saga of the Seven Suns is a massive investment, but well worth it if you like science fiction. I am looking forward to the n st few books.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Randall Andrews

    Once again Kevin j. Anderson weaves an amazing story through many eyes in the expanding tale. I'm sure when I finish the saga I will start the new saga of Shadows Once again Kevin j. Anderson weaves an amazing story through many eyes in the expanding tale. I'm sure when I finish the saga I will start the new saga of Shadows

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    This is the strongest book so far in the series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Of Fire and Night Well I finished this book in 2 days. I am absolutely loving this saga by Kevin J Anderson. Highly recommend this saga.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    really a 3.5 really liked alot of it, so had to give it higher than just a 3- maybe getting to know the world better, so many players in this world!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hancock

    Best book so far, and easily the most fast paced.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Yun Ting

    Just when you thought that the conflict have been resolved, they throw a massive cliffhanger at you. Moving on to the next book, no time for reviews!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Craig Robinson

    Lots of filler....

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keith Christoffers

    New

  26. 5 out of 5

    Munierv

    Still a cool story, but honestly after five books and with two more to read I feel a bit bored.. I do wanna know the end though =p

  27. 4 out of 5

    Farzan

    Still remember reading this after 10 years. Incredibly written space opera, really does not get better than this!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Waraji Sama

    It took me ages to read this book. Not because I didn't enjoy it--quite the contrary--but because I don't have access to physical books where I live, and I dislike reading on the computer. So that being said, I thought Of Fire and Night was pretty good. In fact, probably the best book in the Saga of Seven Suns that I've read so far. Like all the books in this series, there's a large caste of viewpoint characters, however, with Of Fire and Night, the cast actually seems to have been trimmed down It took me ages to read this book. Not because I didn't enjoy it--quite the contrary--but because I don't have access to physical books where I live, and I dislike reading on the computer. So that being said, I thought Of Fire and Night was pretty good. In fact, probably the best book in the Saga of Seven Suns that I've read so far. Like all the books in this series, there's a large caste of viewpoint characters, however, with Of Fire and Night, the cast actually seems to have been trimmed down somewhat to the most essential characters, so we're seeing more viewpoints by a slightly smaller cast now, rather than the massive castes of the previous books. I think this makes for tighter story telling and a plot that's not quite so spread out. Of Fire and Night had a pretty epic ending, with what I have to say has been the largest space battle in the series involving almost all the characters in two separate locations. It was great! The very last chapter also has quite a cliffhanger which will get you revved up to read the next book--I know I am! As someone who aspires to write novels for a living myself, I've been wondering about Kevin J. Anderson's writing style for some time. Previously I described it as being light on description, and heavy on narrative, where the scenes don't feel entirely enveloping, which creates more of a story telling feel. The truth is, Kevin J. Anderson's writing isn't very concrete, but abstract. I don't know if this is the style of writing he chooses for all his works, but I think it's appropriate for this style of story with so many characters, or else, every chapter would be twenty pages, and this would be a thirty book series, not a seven book series. With his style, he's able to develop a lot of the plot very quickly. I think the downside of this style is that the writing isn't as satisfying as it could be. That being said, Kevin J. Anderson is one of my favorite authors, and I give this book five stars for being an enjoying read that has occupied me periodically for the last few months. On another note, The Saga of Seven Suns doesn't have very high ratings. In fact, not a single book of the series has a 4 star, or higher, rating. This is unfortunate, as I have read many of the reviews, and could not find any readers who's disappointment came about because of the style of the writing, or because of the massive cast, which can be confusing during the first book. No, many reviewers have a problem with this series because they think it's science fiction, and expect hard science, when in fact, The Saga of Seven Suns is space opera, and the world building, lets just say, tends to err on the side of slightly fantasy, which for me is totally fine, since the author never pulls anything crazy from out of nowhere, and generally develops these things far in advance, so when some new piece of world building or technology finally does come into play, it's not unexpected. Looking forward to reading the next book in epic space opera, the Saga of Seven Suns!

  29. 4 out of 5

    D.w.

    Still ticking. This series reminds me of the old Timex commercials. All that is bad about it has not been fixed. The time scale, the short chapters. Now we have a few new terrible elements. The pregnancy that will not end. As we see so many things happening, as the author wanted to build to his first climax he had placed one of he numerous main characters into the situation of expectant motherhood. That was a good plot point. Except with all that has happened, the woman must be carrying the child Still ticking. This series reminds me of the old Timex commercials. All that is bad about it has not been fixed. The time scale, the short chapters. Now we have a few new terrible elements. The pregnancy that will not end. As we see so many things happening, as the author wanted to build to his first climax he had placed one of he numerous main characters into the situation of expectant motherhood. That was a good plot point. Except with all that has happened, the woman must be carrying the child for over two years. It is amazing to me that such a large scale spic has not taken into account any calendar. The second large scale problem that emerges in this book is the items to lead to victory. They have been building a little for a few books. The main enemy has seen several others show up to attack them back. Not in alliance, but willing to fight and end the war. Then also our heroes come up with various technologies that become as destructive against the enemy as they have been against our heroes. So destructive we see that they can be utterly destroyed by just one of them. (The balance of power had been that the aliens could have done that to the humans from the beginning but had been doing a slow measured campaign instead of total annihilation, but now at book 5 want to totally annihilate humanity.) Then all at once in a battle for earth, most come together in ways that see much of the eradication of the enemy. Overwhelmingly. Five books of space opera to end in a few pages. Wouldn't our greatest war have been nice like that. Japan keep attacking the US territories and Allies, whittling away and then in a week we and all our friends can mount an attack that stops them dead in their tracks. It is us developing the nuclear bomb, but not have done any of the island hopping campaign before that. It might have worked, but Anderson just does not sell it. He finally resolves matters between his monomaniacal leader on earth, but the man could never have run the planet and sphere of humanity without more competent leadership as a check and balance, or without more then the three aides he seems to have. By making this subplot continue for so long, it has made his hero king look like a wimp. Even when he takes action to kill someone, another comes to play and makes his hands ultimately free of taint. A story where heroes aren't. Just now to finish it up and tell all if it can redeem itself, or continue to enumerate where it fails. The worst thing to note is how Anderson drones on in the end about his process and those who helped him. Did no one catch these items I point out? Was a sense of time totally ignored on purpose? This needed more time on the drawing board before it was released. Never read again.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thackshila

    5th book of the installation. The story is continuing with gathered phase and the plot is twisting all over. One thing I find rather tedious is the the author's tendency to repeat. Its good if you're someone with bad memory or take too long between the books, but it get really tiring when you're reading the saga continuously! and unlike the earlier books in the saga, the plot is seems to have bigger plot holes. And I really hope someone draw up a map of the spiral arm with the different star sys 5th book of the installation. The story is continuing with gathered phase and the plot is twisting all over. One thing I find rather tedious is the the author's tendency to repeat. Its good if you're someone with bad memory or take too long between the books, but it get really tiring when you're reading the saga continuously! and unlike the earlier books in the saga, the plot is seems to have bigger plot holes. And I really hope someone draw up a map of the spiral arm with the different star systems and planets because the distances and time taken to travel between the different systems. The timelines seems to be getting a bit funny!

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