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Hellboy, Vol. 4: The Right Hand of Doom

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Dark Horse presents new editions of the entire Hellboy line with new covers, beginning with Seed of Destruction, the basis of director Guillermo del Toro's upcoming film. Hellboy is one of the most celebrated comics series in recent years. The ultimate artists' artist and a great storyteller whose work is in turns haunting, hilarious, and spellbinding. Mike Mignola has won Dark Horse presents new editions of the entire Hellboy line with new covers, beginning with Seed of Destruction, the basis of director Guillermo del Toro's upcoming film. Hellboy is one of the most celebrated comics series in recent years. The ultimate artists' artist and a great storyteller whose work is in turns haunting, hilarious, and spellbinding. Mike Mignola has won numerous awards in the comics industry and beyond. When strangeness threatens to engulf the world, a strange man will come to save it. Sent to investigate a mystery with supernatural overtones, Hellboy discovers the secrets of his own origins, and his link to the Nazi occultists who promised Hitler a final solution in the form of a demonic avatar. "The best horror comic in a generation. This Mignola guy is a wizard" —Frank Miller


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Dark Horse presents new editions of the entire Hellboy line with new covers, beginning with Seed of Destruction, the basis of director Guillermo del Toro's upcoming film. Hellboy is one of the most celebrated comics series in recent years. The ultimate artists' artist and a great storyteller whose work is in turns haunting, hilarious, and spellbinding. Mike Mignola has won Dark Horse presents new editions of the entire Hellboy line with new covers, beginning with Seed of Destruction, the basis of director Guillermo del Toro's upcoming film. Hellboy is one of the most celebrated comics series in recent years. The ultimate artists' artist and a great storyteller whose work is in turns haunting, hilarious, and spellbinding. Mike Mignola has won numerous awards in the comics industry and beyond. When strangeness threatens to engulf the world, a strange man will come to save it. Sent to investigate a mystery with supernatural overtones, Hellboy discovers the secrets of his own origins, and his link to the Nazi occultists who promised Hitler a final solution in the form of a demonic avatar. "The best horror comic in a generation. This Mignola guy is a wizard" —Frank Miller

30 review for Hellboy, Vol. 4: The Right Hand of Doom

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    All in all, I thought this was quite enjoyable. Notably, the whole origin story for Hellboy and his place in the world. Other than that, the short stories were relatively cool and I especially love the homages to folklore and mythology. I get a thrill out of old tales that seem ancient and obscure even to me. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Five stars just for Pancakes alone. In many ways, these shorter stories do a better job of showcasing Hellboy's character than the longer form stories. I don't know if there's anything better than just cracking open a short story where Hellboy beats a monster into submission. Five stars just for Pancakes alone. In many ways, these shorter stories do a better job of showcasing Hellboy's character than the longer form stories. I don't know if there's anything better than just cracking open a short story where Hellboy beats a monster into submission.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diz

    In this volume, you'll learn how powerful pancakes can be against the forces of evil. Mignola's writing and art are strong. He's masterfully skilled at weaving together folklore and occult lore with pulp action. In this volume, you'll learn how powerful pancakes can be against the forces of evil. Mignola's writing and art are strong. He's masterfully skilled at weaving together folklore and occult lore with pulp action.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    For some reason, I grabbed this graphic novel from my library, thinking it was the second in the series. I read this right after I finished Seed of Destruction, and I have to say I liked this much more. Maybe because of the short story format and the use of different folklore legends. As I've said before in my reviews of Mignola's work, I love his appreciation and encyclopedic knowledge of folklore from all over the world. As a person who is an enormous life-time lover of folklore, mythology and For some reason, I grabbed this graphic novel from my library, thinking it was the second in the series. I read this right after I finished Seed of Destruction, and I have to say I liked this much more. Maybe because of the short story format and the use of different folklore legends. As I've said before in my reviews of Mignola's work, I love his appreciation and encyclopedic knowledge of folklore from all over the world. As a person who is an enormous life-time lover of folklore, mythology and fairytales, I am endlessly charmed by modern writers who plumb the depths of existing folklore traditions and explore those in their work. I share Mignola's interest in the darker folklore and also his appreciation for the Gothic and Classic horror story. He mixes these snippets together into a whole that brings a respectful homage to all and creates something new as a result. Mignola starts off this collection with a charming story called "Pancakes," in which a young Hellboy experiences pancakes for the first time, and the demons of hell mourn because they know they have lost his loyalty. Pancakes will always trump over ruling in hell. You have to laugh at that! I had never heard of St. Leonard of Limousin, a folk story about a hero who fights a dragon and where his blood drips, lilies grow. Mignola does a nice twist on this, in "The Nature of the Beast," where Hellboy (with some help from St. Leonard himself) wins the day. "King Vord" taps into the Norse legends when Hellboy gets sent to Norway to help out an old friend of Professor Bruttenholm, and is both dark and amusing. Be careful what you wish for! "Goodbye, Mr. Tod," is a nod towards Lovecraft and spiritualist belief in manipulating ectoplasm. I didn't have very strong feelings towards this story. Hellboy is the narrator through frame stories that revisit dark folktales from as far away as Japan, such as the story "Heads" in which Hellboy spends the night in the house of very strange hosts who have a tendency to lose their heads. Nobody knows how to scare a reader like the Japanese, or so it seems. I am too much of a coward to watch the Japanese horror movies, but here is a nicely chilling story for me to enjoy in that tradition. Readers of Le Fanu's "Carmilla" will appreciate "The Vârcolac" as it looks at Eastern European vampire legends and has a scene that stood out for me from reading "Carmilla." My favorite story was "Box Full of Evil", a pure horror story that features the Hand of Glory folk legend and some really evil people who think they can make deals with devils and come out on top. I have to give this one five stars because it captivated me and had me writing down the various legends to look them up. That's always good when a book makes me want to do research on the background material used in the stories. A very enjoyable read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    These are a series of short stories about Hellboy from youth to maturity. It was mildly engaging and the last story with the Cthulhu references was the most interesting. The previous ones tried a bit too much for humor and only half delivered to my tastes. Some of the tales weren't developed enough, too. ARTWORK: B; STORY/PLOTTING: B minus; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B minus; OVERALL GRADE: B minus; WHEN READ: March to April 2012. These are a series of short stories about Hellboy from youth to maturity. It was mildly engaging and the last story with the Cthulhu references was the most interesting. The previous ones tried a bit too much for humor and only half delivered to my tastes. Some of the tales weren't developed enough, too. ARTWORK: B; STORY/PLOTTING: B minus; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B minus; OVERALL GRADE: B minus; WHEN READ: March to April 2012.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Slowly but surely continuing my re-read of Hellboy. The main thing in this volume is explaining the origin of Hellboy's stone hand and its role in the fate of the world, no less. An important volume, and a pretty fun read, although probably not as exciting as the stories that are yet to come. Still, a very solid collection. First read: October 25, 2015 Rating: ★★★★・ Second read: January 3, 2017 Rating: ★★★★・ Slowly but surely continuing my re-read of Hellboy. The main thing in this volume is explaining the origin of Hellboy's stone hand and its role in the fate of the world, no less. An important volume, and a pretty fun read, although probably not as exciting as the stories that are yet to come. Still, a very solid collection. First read: October 25, 2015 Rating: ★★★★・ Second read: January 3, 2017 Rating: ★★★★・

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I think I like each Hellboy trade I read a little bit more than the one before it. I love how Mignola uses folklore and mythology as a basis for many of his stories, I really like Hellboy as a character, and the pancakes story, short as it was, was brilliant.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jelena

    By now, I am deeply convinced that every man, woman, octopus and chest-of-drawers with even the least trace of self-esteem is bound to have a bit of a crush on Hellboy. But getting back to the point: This volume is a combination of several (very) short stories, and one longer narration, more deeply rooted into Hellboy’s origin. To begin with, there is a medieval saint, a dragon (very old-school) and flowers blooming where blood has fallen. I don’t know about you, but for me those kinds of legend By now, I am deeply convinced that every man, woman, octopus and chest-of-drawers with even the least trace of self-esteem is bound to have a bit of a crush on Hellboy. But getting back to the point: This volume is a combination of several (very) short stories, and one longer narration, more deeply rooted into Hellboy’s origin. To begin with, there is a medieval saint, a dragon (very old-school) and flowers blooming where blood has fallen. I don’t know about you, but for me those kinds of legends have always worked like a magnet, so gloomy and atmospheric with their curses and charms and obscure mythology. Then there is also a Viking king turned pale rider. And I seriously couldn’t say which of those is cooler and moodier. Not to mention the dead mermaid. I had no idea how creepy even the sole idea of a dead mermaid is – like a dead fish, but also like a ghastly drowned dead body, a bloated Ophelia of sorts. Also, you get ghost samurais and something rather Lovecraftian breaking out. (Though an honourable mention goes to the one feat I wouldn’t have thought possible: Mignola manages to create a fairly decent one-shot out of two unspeakably dreadful components – namely American-style pancakes and toddlers. It all seems to be a matter of craftsmanship and technique: Don’t overdo it, don’t push too many comic reliefs, wrap it up swiftly in roughly a dozen panels, and obviously it can work.) As for the one big thread: Given that this is Hellboy and the title being “The Right Hand of Doom”, it is not hard to guess where the whole background/origin story is going. So no need to spoil the fun for anyone. But it can be said that there is a chimpanzee firing a pistol in one of the most pop-artsy panels out there, and that Abe is being his wonderful, sophisticated self. But there is also something so fluffy and tender and sweet here, and it comes down to being what you make of yourself on you own accord, as opposed to the impassive result of some predestination. Now, under any other circumstances that would be a tacky, sugary load of kitsch. But this is “Hellboy”. And with “Hellboy” anything goes and everything works. Because Hellboy is love.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    OK, I admit it. I loved the pancakes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Stewart

    More please!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    Best one in the series so far, very entertaining, with its blend of horror folklore and its own mythology.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    While I am a fairly latecomer to the Hellboy comic series, did enjoy the three movies well enough, I am picking up some fun reads concerning this red demon champion for humanity. The collection of short tales opens with Hellboy discovering pancakes which is hilarious. The other tales are visual feasts and story wise more excellent than not. You get more insight in the character of Hellboy and his place in the world. Well worth you time reading these books.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    4.5 stars

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa McShane

    Re-read 8/1/15: Pretty much what I thought below continues true, though I was more amused this time by "King Vold," in which Hellboy is tricked into battling a hound of Hell on someone else's behalf. Even better is the final story, "Box Full of Evil," which has a lot of twists, as well as tying into "The Right Hand of Doom," which I like. 6/19/12: The fourth graphic novel in the series is another collection of stories, and I think I like this better than the previous (Hellboy: The Chained Coffin Re-read 8/1/15: Pretty much what I thought below continues true, though I was more amused this time by "King Vold," in which Hellboy is tricked into battling a hound of Hell on someone else's behalf. Even better is the final story, "Box Full of Evil," which has a lot of twists, as well as tying into "The Right Hand of Doom," which I like. 6/19/12: The fourth graphic novel in the series is another collection of stories, and I think I like this better than the previous (Hellboy: The Chained Coffin and Others), mainly because most of the stories are based on more interesting folklore. There's also the adorable very-short story "Pancakes" (proving Hellboy was a kid just like any other, once upon a time) and the titular "The Right Hand of Doom" with its explanation of why Hellboy has that stone hand which seems so very awkward.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Seizure Romero

    Japanese floating-head demons, killer ectoplasm, Romanian vampires, the Beast-of-the-Apocalypse, a gun-wielding monkey & a variety of occult hijinks-- all gloriously wrought by the pen of Mike Mignola-- and I'd give it five stars for "Pancakes" alone. Japanese floating-head demons, killer ectoplasm, Romanian vampires, the Beast-of-the-Apocalypse, a gun-wielding monkey & a variety of occult hijinks-- all gloriously wrought by the pen of Mike Mignola-- and I'd give it five stars for "Pancakes" alone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    I liked each of the short stories in this volume, and how there's a bit more information in a couple of the stories about Hellboy's purpose on earth. And there are pancakes! I liked each of the short stories in this volume, and how there's a bit more information in a couple of the stories about Hellboy's purpose on earth. And there are pancakes!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paz R.M.

    PANCAKES IS THE BEST STORY EVER AND IT'S ONLY 2 PAGES, GIMME ALL THE CUTE BABY HELLBOY CONTENT NOW! RTC. PANCAKES IS THE BEST STORY EVER AND IT'S ONLY 2 PAGES, GIMME ALL THE CUTE BABY HELLBOY CONTENT NOW! RTC.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    Another strong collection of short stories, though they just don't have the punch to them that the ones in volume three have. Each has a solid premise, but seems to end before a satisfying conclusion is reached. I love Hellboy's flip attitude and the way not everything has to have a logical explanation, but it's hard to feel satisfied by three straight stories that end with a shrug and "There you go," "You never see something like that coming," and "How's that?" This one also contains the first H Another strong collection of short stories, though they just don't have the punch to them that the ones in volume three have. Each has a solid premise, but seems to end before a satisfying conclusion is reached. I love Hellboy's flip attitude and the way not everything has to have a logical explanation, but it's hard to feel satisfied by three straight stories that end with a shrug and "There you go," "You never see something like that coming," and "How's that?" This one also contains the first Hellboy story I ever read, "The Right Hand of Doom" from the Dark Horse Presents Annual in 1998. I bought that issue for the first comic version of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which I didn't think too highly of, but came away with a desire to learn more about the big red guy and an appreciation that's lasted to this day.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    Finished "re-reading" this updated version, which still makes me like Hellboy more and more every time I read a story with him. You like Hellboy? Keep reading! You don't? No? Why? You suck! Read it. Finished "re-reading" this updated version, which still makes me like Hellboy more and more every time I read a story with him. You like Hellboy? Keep reading! You don't? No? Why? You suck! Read it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    David

    Halloween is fast approaching, but I didn't have anything spooky on the nightstand or the kindle, so I went to the library and picked up the next two volumes of Hellboy. The Right Hand of Doom is a collection of eight stories: one backstory, five missions, and two which deal with Hellboy and his destiny. Hellboy typically gives people the benefit of the doubt. He might harbor suspicions, but he won't act on them until he gets more information. As such, people mistake this behavior for weakness or Halloween is fast approaching, but I didn't have anything spooky on the nightstand or the kindle, so I went to the library and picked up the next two volumes of Hellboy. The Right Hand of Doom is a collection of eight stories: one backstory, five missions, and two which deal with Hellboy and his destiny. Hellboy typically gives people the benefit of the doubt. He might harbor suspicions, but he won't act on them until he gets more information. As such, people mistake this behavior for weakness or cluelessness. But in the end, Hellboy rallies or fate intervenes, and these people ultimately come out on the losing end of things. This theme runs through "The Nature of the Beast," "King Vold," and "Heads." And Hellboy has a sense of humor, too, although it can be a bit dark sometimes. "Pancakes," "Heads," and "Goodbye, Mister Tod" have their humorous incidents, whether they be intended or not. "Pancakes" kicks things off, and it's about Hellboy's introduction to, as can be surmised, pancakes. It's a short—merely two pages—and cute. I won't say anything else to avoid spoiling it. "The Nature of the Beast" sees Hellboy off to meet some cabal of Englishmen in 1954 to investigate the folktale of one Saint Leonard the Hermit. Apparently there's a dragon involved. Professor Bruttenholm asks Hellboy to go to Norway in 1956 to help out a friend, and fellow paranormal researcher, in "King Vold." Said friend is investigating King Vold, aka the Flying Huntsman. Hellboy goes to Japan in "Heads." The year is 1967, and Hellboy is wandering in the forests outside of Kyoto, looking for a haunted house, where he is put up for the night at the local equivalent of a bed and breakfast. In 1979, the Bureau sends him to Portland, Oregon to investigate a complaint about a physical medium in "Goodbye, Mister Tod." "Just say no" never carried as serious a repercussion as what's portrayed here. "The Vârcolac" sees Hellboy investigating the rise of Countess Ilona Kakosy, a powerful vampire, in Romania in 1992. Even Hellboy feels fear. "The Right Hand of Doom" and "Box Full of Evil" are bookends of a sort. The collection's title track gathers all that we have learned about Hellboy's past and details that came up in volumes one and two and reflects upon them. The latter story finds someone attempting to force Hellboy's destiny upon him, not to bring about the Apocalypse as Rasputin hoped, but to enslave him. Combined, these stories reflect on destiny and fate. Are we bound to it, and thus, do we let it control us? Is free will an illusion? Do we make our own fate, or is it predetermined? These are questions that Hellboy has to answer for himself, with a little bit of help of course. The artwork remains quintessential Mignola. The man knows how to make the most of shadows and light. Dave Stewart colored this volume, using a palette of muted pastels to evoke the surroundings of our intrepid red friend.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    The Right Hand of Doom (which is my favorite title of all the books in Mignola's Hellboy series), is a collection of eight short stories featuring everybody's favorite big red guy. They're set at various times through his career and based on different bits of folklore or mythology. The art is terrific, varying in shading and detail depending on the tone and circumstances of the story. Mignola seemed willing to be more experimental and bold in these shorter pieces. Pancakes is a hysterically funn The Right Hand of Doom (which is my favorite title of all the books in Mignola's Hellboy series), is a collection of eight short stories featuring everybody's favorite big red guy. They're set at various times through his career and based on different bits of folklore or mythology. The art is terrific, varying in shading and detail depending on the tone and circumstances of the story. Mignola seemed willing to be more experimental and bold in these shorter pieces. Pancakes is a hysterically funny two-pager, and my two favorites are Heads and Box Full of Evil, though they're all superior works. Recommended!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    More of the shorter stories from other places that Mignola's collected together and either edited or added to. Hellboy interacts with all the fables and stories that Mignola adapts. It's a cool way to have him do a bunch of things, and to show just how deep his history is. We also get a lot of stuff about the true nature of Hellboy, the roots in Hell, and with evil, and how he ignores where he came from and just moves along. Hence our title: Right Hand of Doom, which explains how he's fated to br More of the shorter stories from other places that Mignola's collected together and either edited or added to. Hellboy interacts with all the fables and stories that Mignola adapts. It's a cool way to have him do a bunch of things, and to show just how deep his history is. We also get a lot of stuff about the true nature of Hellboy, the roots in Hell, and with evil, and how he ignores where he came from and just moves along. Hence our title: Right Hand of Doom, which explains how he's fated to bring evil into the universe. As usual, the art is top notch, and there's still Hellboy's irreverent humour in the face of death. He catches a lot of beatdowns here, poor bastard. We also see him and Abe Sapien check out some weird shit involving: Castles, spirits, evil, no that doesn't sound like them at all! 3.5 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    Maybe slightly less completely amazing than The Chained Coffin, The Right Hand of Doom still features a near-perfect collection of Hellboy short stories, including "Heads," "Goodbye, Mister Tod," and "Box Full of Evil." Maybe slightly less completely amazing than The Chained Coffin, The Right Hand of Doom still features a near-perfect collection of Hellboy short stories, including "Heads," "Goodbye, Mister Tod," and "Box Full of Evil."

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    Another scattered story chapter that is interesting but without a full story I feel letdown. The last two stories are the only ones that serve the grand mythology and while they are welcomed I just didn't see the point in collecting all these stories. Definitely one just for the hardcore fans, people like myself seeking one full story will be left disappointed. Mignola is a terrific artist and writer so I'm always interested on what's being left on the page. Another scattered story chapter that is interesting but without a full story I feel letdown. The last two stories are the only ones that serve the grand mythology and while they are welcomed I just didn't see the point in collecting all these stories. Definitely one just for the hardcore fans, people like myself seeking one full story will be left disappointed. Mignola is a terrific artist and writer so I'm always interested on what's being left on the page.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    3.5. There's just always something missing for me. I can't be the only one??? Someone please explain what I'm missing! FRTC 3.5. There's just always something missing for me. I can't be the only one??? Someone please explain what I'm missing! FRTC

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Sevitt

    I've never been the biggest fan of Hellboy or Mike Mignola, but I picked up a couple of these volumes very reasonably in a charity shop in London and decided to give them a read. This one was a neat little collection of 2-pagers and other bits and pieces that had appeared in different comics but were collected here for the first time. I think that Neil Gaiman has done so much more with these kinds of ghost stories and glimpses into Hell, but Hellboy is a cool enough character to make these fun. I've never been the biggest fan of Hellboy or Mike Mignola, but I picked up a couple of these volumes very reasonably in a charity shop in London and decided to give them a read. This one was a neat little collection of 2-pagers and other bits and pieces that had appeared in different comics but were collected here for the first time. I think that Neil Gaiman has done so much more with these kinds of ghost stories and glimpses into Hell, but Hellboy is a cool enough character to make these fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rollin

    Perhaps the only downside to this volume is that every single installments asks far more questions than it answers. Pursuing mystery can be quite fun, but only when the breadcrumbs are sufficient to hold one over. This volume just barely keeps the lid on everything it's trying to prep for later. Perhaps the only downside to this volume is that every single installments asks far more questions than it answers. Pursuing mystery can be quite fun, but only when the breadcrumbs are sufficient to hold one over. This volume just barely keeps the lid on everything it's trying to prep for later.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Grant Jossi

    How many more glowing reviews of these books can I write? At least one more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    I really enjoyed this collection of Hellboy short stories. They don't rely too much on backstory or explanation. Just throw Hellboy into trouble and watch him figure it out (or just get lucky). Lots of great mythological and folklore references. Quick and dirty Hellboy. Pancakes is too much fun! I really enjoyed this collection of Hellboy short stories. They don't rely too much on backstory or explanation. Just throw Hellboy into trouble and watch him figure it out (or just get lucky). Lots of great mythological and folklore references. Quick and dirty Hellboy. Pancakes is too much fun!

  30. 5 out of 5

    SE Panoply

    https://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/20... 1947 in NM, 2 year old HB is playing with Mac the dog, and requesting noodles, when he’s told breakies is ready. He’s ready to deny any liking for the pamcakes being served, until he tries it, and changes his mind. In the capital city of Hell, it’s loud with uncommon cries, and the grand duke being updated by Mammon of HB having tasted the pancake, and they had no chance of getting him to turn, now. The stories which follow, has one based on St. Leonard the https://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/20... 1947 in NM, 2 year old HB is playing with Mac the dog, and requesting noodles, when he’s told breakies is ready. He’s ready to deny any liking for the pamcakes being served, until he tries it, and changes his mind. In the capital city of Hell, it’s loud with uncommon cries, and the grand duke being updated by Mammon of HB having tasted the pancake, and they had no chance of getting him to turn, now. The stories which follow, has one based on St. Leonard the Hermit, the Flying Huntsman, and the Green Giant, along with references to Norwegian folklore. Eng. 1954, at the Osiris Club, which HB is asked to help the men in regards to killing a dragon. 1 of the men continues to explain, this dragon is the St. Leonard worm, and 1400 years previous it murdered and ate kids, animals, and military men courageous enough to go after it. When a monk attempts to stop it, and succeeds, he also becomes hurt, and wherever his blood fell, lilies sprouted. HB is skeptical til reaching the woods, and seeing some lilies around a statue, next getting whacked by the snaking dragon, then it traps and wraps him against the statue with its bod. Fortunately, the serendipitous accident of the statue’s sword breaking loose, and killing the dragon by stabbing it through the skull occurs, the Osiris Club learning this by the old woman seeing it. They resign themselves to not knowing HB’s true self, yet regardless of it being good or bad. NY, 1956 HB has gotten an offer to conduct research with a genius Norwegian folklorist, and college bud to Trevor, whom isn’t forcing HB to accept, but would consider it a favor if he’d agree. A week after, HB gets to Norway, and Prof Aikman shows him all the historical weird sites. They conclude with the area most known for people hearing King Vold passing, HB a lure, hopefully, in Aikman’s opinion. HB isn’t optimistic about if this fool did show, he wouldn’t have to combat him, Aikman naively thinking the god would be friendly. When King Vold shows up, Aikman has HB hide and accepts a task from the King to care for his lame wolf til he returned. When he leaves, HB realizes the shit Aikman got them into, the Prof thinking it’d be an easy way to make gold, HB having to fling the prof away when the wolf goes half man, and attacks. Whilst HB struggles against the changing wolf, Aikman realizes King Vold’s pack were Viking beserkers, he then noticing HB knocked down, and the Viking staring at him. Just in time, King Vold returns, and gives Aikman the gold, 1 burning a hole through his hand. When HB returns, Trevor admits regret, but HB learned something, as Trevor had suspected he would, Aikman ending up as a beggar, unfortunately. Heads is heavy on Japanese Folklore, Goodbye, Mister Tod is Lovecraftian, and the Varcolac is a retelling and is about a Romanian vampire. A house in Kyoto has a terrible history to the point of the village around it dying off, and now only demons living there. 1967, HB’s sleeping outside when a man knocks his face with some pebbles waking him, and inviting him to his home, since it’s safer than being out near the woods at night. The man intros the other travelers as they’re telling stories, HB listening as 1 lady tells of a man getting a box which he should never open, hides, but his hubby finds and opens, he immediately dying. The wife becomes crazy and lives like an animal. After this chestnut HB feigns sleepiness and is led to a private room. He next goes back out to request water and discovers all the traveler’s now don’t have heads. HB goes outside with the bodies and chucks them in the lake next going to see if any heads were lying about. HB hears them chatting about seeing whether he was sleeping, planning on eating him, the 1 informing the others he’d gone with their bodies. HB shoots 1, incredulous about their plan to use him as food. The heads becomes desperate to learn where their bodies are before sunrise, they not making it as they annoy HB by biting his clothes. HB tells them where their bodies are as they burn away. Portland, 1979 HB gets the story about Tod being a great medium til he began taking drugs, and then faking his readings. Now, though he is stuck looking mummified as a huge mass has half-formed from his juices, HB helps get rid of the creature with herbs being burnt, but Tod explodes in the process. Yorkshire 1982, HB discovers Countess Ilona after nearly 7 years about and he’s readying to stake her when the floor collapses. COuntess is accompanied by man skeletons, they taking him to the master, Vârcolac. HB notes his enormity as Countess talks him up. Then, HB realizes Countess has vision-quested him, so he stakes her as she tells him to stop. The Right Hand of Doom alludes more to HB’s hand, and Box Full of Evil builds on his hand, and where he stood with the Beast of the Apocalypse stuff. Spain, HB meets Malcolm Frost’s son, his pop having tried to kill HB when he’d been brought to Earth, but he failing to get anyone to side with him, dying shortly after his public shaming. His son gives him 1 of his pop’s notes, it having writing in Lemurian, and told of his Right Hand of Doom. Adrian Frost then requests to hear HB’s origin story. HB relates how quickly he’d grown, and joined BPRD, going through the quick timeline, reaching Rasputin, HB having the dream where Satan takes his ma, and looks at him, and afterward fights Hecate, and not really thinking about whether more will happen. Adrian brings up the valid point of why they’d let him be, HB threatening to cut the hand off, but Adrian noting wherever he hit it, wouldn’t keep anyone from using it. After, Adrian blesses HB before he leaves, marveling at the weirdness of life. England, HB is getting a story from a Mr. Heath regarding an odd experience the previous night at 12, he unable to speak, and seeing a pleased looking ghostly figure carrying a hand candle, and he unable to move til after 11 in the morning, then learning it had occurred to his staff, as well. Abe determines the candle hand is real, and the effects he’d felt had been from the hangman’s burning hand. Mr. Heath also admits to getting a vision of a house like the 1 from Poe’s Fall of the House of Usher. Scotland, a hubby and wife have given their last possessions to Satan, they just having gotten the ancient box with a demon inside, the man also providing the hard to locate key. Upon opening, the woman thinks he’d swindled them, inhaling the fly from inside it, and next having godly powers. The man shows he’s protected from her wrath though, and how he’d used a pendant, and knew the demon’s name, which he’d read on the inside of the box. The man, Bromhead is offered the info of his house providing a hidden fortune to get more riches and become powerful as he wishes. The demon then tips him off to a harbinger of apocalypse, whom wears an invisible crown, and happens to already be near the premises. HB is walking up to the house with Abe, the 2 chatting about how fishy is was Mr. Heath had a vision of this place, HB having been there once before, way back when. After knocking HB optimistically dreads the possibility, the 2 bozos inside had opened the box. Upon going inside, and shouting for Guarino, it’s quiet, so Abe suggests they wander to the 2nd floor. It’s still quiet, til HB sees a monkey with a gun, Abe getting shot, and Bromhead coming out to bind HB, since he knew his true name. HB recognizes Bromhead, and he finishes his incantation to show HB’s crown, his little demon fetching it. When the demon puts it on, he allows Bromhead to beat up HB, but not to death, til they get his hand cut off, his blood by death possibly contaminating their power over it, otherwise. Bromhead is given the sword to cut the hand with, as HB is being spiritually led to follow the voice of a goblin, whom reminds him of what his true name meant, Anung un Rama, which HB doesn’t know, the goblin, with a small group around him, tells HB it isn’t his true name, then. This prompts HB to ask what the demon thought he was doing with the sword he now held over him. HB next punches the sword into breaking, then clocks the demon a few times. Abe deals with the monkey having bound him against a wall. Getting free he ends up throwing the monkey through the brick wall after shooting him, the monkey falling onto a crap ton of gold coins, and chests. As Abe walks through the house in search of HB, he sees Bromhead running toward him, the ass denying knowing where HB could be located, he locking himself in a room and praying to his demon master, whom seems to answer by partially changing him into a lizard. HB beats the power out of the demon cousin, and also crushes the box-fly as he fell after it out a window. Dripping from the pond, HB releases the fly to his lord, whom sticks him in his frozen prison once more. He offers HB his crown back, but he refuses, so the lord tells of keeping it for him in the hall of hell, his crown remaining there, which HB didn’t care about. He locates Abe, whom is ready to chill in a hospital for awhile, and tells HB of Bromhead getting bricked behind a wall. Kate travels to England, and meets HB at a cemetery, updating him of Abe’s better health, and mentioning how BPRD wasn’t impressed with his report, but he isn’t going to share his personal details for them. HB shows Kate the note, before releasing it to the wind, after having explained his plan to continue to ignore references to his path, the note getting picked up by a crow, which he decides to ignore by offering to check out a haunted castle with a ghost lady riding a donkey indoors. Another amusingly entertaining installment!

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