web site hit counter The Treehouse: Eccentric Wisdom from My Father on How to Live, Love, and See - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Treehouse: Eccentric Wisdom from My Father on How to Live, Love, and See

Availability: Ready to download

Bestselling author Naomi Wolf was brought up to believe that happiness is something that can be taught -- and learned. In this magical book, Naomi shares the enduring wisdom of her father, Leonard Wolf, a poet and teacher who believes that every person is an artist in their own unique way, and that personal creativity is the secret of happiness. Leonard Wolf is a true ecc Bestselling author Naomi Wolf was brought up to believe that happiness is something that can be taught -- and learned. In this magical book, Naomi shares the enduring wisdom of her father, Leonard Wolf, a poet and teacher who believes that every person is an artist in their own unique way, and that personal creativity is the secret of happiness. Leonard Wolf is a true eccentric. A tall, craggy, good-looking man in his early eighties, he's the kind of person who likes to use a medieval astrolabe, dress in Basque shepherd's clothing, and convince otherwise sensible people to quit their jobs and follow their passions. A gifted teacher, he's dedicated his life to honoring individualism, creativity, and the inspirational power of art. Leonard believes, and has made many others believe, that inside everyone is an artist, and success and happiness in life depend on whether or not one values and acts upon one's creative impulse. In The Treehouse, Naomi Wolf's most personal book yet, Naomi outlines her father's lessons in creating lasting happiness and offers inspiration for the artist in all of us. The book begins when Naomi asks Leonard to help build a treehouse for his granddaughter. Inspired by his dedication to her daughter's imaginative world, Naomi asks her father to walk her through the lessons of his popular poetry class and show her how he teaches people to liberate their creative selves. Drawn from Leonard's handwritten lecture notes, the chapters of The Treehouse remind us to "Be Still and Listen," "Use Your Imagination," "Do Nothing Without Passion," and that "Your Only Wage Will Be Joy," and "Mistakes Are Part of the Draft." More than an education in poetry writing, this is a journey of self-discovery in which the creative endeavor is paramount. Naomi also offers glimpses into her father's past -- from his youth during the Depression to his bohemian years as a poet in 1950s San Francisco -- and the evolution of Leonard's highly individualistic vision of the artist's way. She reconsiders her own childhood and realizes the transformative effect Leonard's philosophy has had on her own life, as well as the lives of her students and friends. The Treehouse is ultimately a stirring personal history, a meditation on fathers and daughters, an argument for honoring the creative impulse, and unique instruction in the art of personal happiness.


Compare

Bestselling author Naomi Wolf was brought up to believe that happiness is something that can be taught -- and learned. In this magical book, Naomi shares the enduring wisdom of her father, Leonard Wolf, a poet and teacher who believes that every person is an artist in their own unique way, and that personal creativity is the secret of happiness. Leonard Wolf is a true ecc Bestselling author Naomi Wolf was brought up to believe that happiness is something that can be taught -- and learned. In this magical book, Naomi shares the enduring wisdom of her father, Leonard Wolf, a poet and teacher who believes that every person is an artist in their own unique way, and that personal creativity is the secret of happiness. Leonard Wolf is a true eccentric. A tall, craggy, good-looking man in his early eighties, he's the kind of person who likes to use a medieval astrolabe, dress in Basque shepherd's clothing, and convince otherwise sensible people to quit their jobs and follow their passions. A gifted teacher, he's dedicated his life to honoring individualism, creativity, and the inspirational power of art. Leonard believes, and has made many others believe, that inside everyone is an artist, and success and happiness in life depend on whether or not one values and acts upon one's creative impulse. In The Treehouse, Naomi Wolf's most personal book yet, Naomi outlines her father's lessons in creating lasting happiness and offers inspiration for the artist in all of us. The book begins when Naomi asks Leonard to help build a treehouse for his granddaughter. Inspired by his dedication to her daughter's imaginative world, Naomi asks her father to walk her through the lessons of his popular poetry class and show her how he teaches people to liberate their creative selves. Drawn from Leonard's handwritten lecture notes, the chapters of The Treehouse remind us to "Be Still and Listen," "Use Your Imagination," "Do Nothing Without Passion," and that "Your Only Wage Will Be Joy," and "Mistakes Are Part of the Draft." More than an education in poetry writing, this is a journey of self-discovery in which the creative endeavor is paramount. Naomi also offers glimpses into her father's past -- from his youth during the Depression to his bohemian years as a poet in 1950s San Francisco -- and the evolution of Leonard's highly individualistic vision of the artist's way. She reconsiders her own childhood and realizes the transformative effect Leonard's philosophy has had on her own life, as well as the lives of her students and friends. The Treehouse is ultimately a stirring personal history, a meditation on fathers and daughters, an argument for honoring the creative impulse, and unique instruction in the art of personal happiness.

30 review for The Treehouse: Eccentric Wisdom from My Father on How to Live, Love, and See

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hunter

    I really enjoy the character Naomi Wolf creates around her father, and find that the book contains some really spot-on advice about creativity, personal growth, and all that. What I find distracting, though, is that the author herself irks me to a degree that makes it difficult to enjoy the book as a whole. There is something transparently self-satisfied in her descriptions of her life and process, and her idolatry of her father lacks perspective. Something about the near-worship with which she I really enjoy the character Naomi Wolf creates around her father, and find that the book contains some really spot-on advice about creativity, personal growth, and all that. What I find distracting, though, is that the author herself irks me to a degree that makes it difficult to enjoy the book as a whole. There is something transparently self-satisfied in her descriptions of her life and process, and her idolatry of her father lacks perspective. Something about the near-worship with which she describes him makes me uncomfortable, as do her self-reproachful reflections on her adolescent rebellion (which is, after all, part of an adolescent's job description).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I don't always like Naomi Wolf but her books always have an interesting concept to them. I enjoyed the central idea of her Dad's - that no matter what you do, you can use your creativity. After years of being looked down on by people who see themselves as creative, I really enjoyed the concept that every job, every task, is a chance to be creative and that creativity takes many forms - in writing a story, helping a customer, even working in an investment bank. However, although Naomi obviously i I don't always like Naomi Wolf but her books always have an interesting concept to them. I enjoyed the central idea of her Dad's - that no matter what you do, you can use your creativity. After years of being looked down on by people who see themselves as creative, I really enjoyed the concept that every job, every task, is a chance to be creative and that creativity takes many forms - in writing a story, helping a customer, even working in an investment bank. However, although Naomi obviously is very fond of her Dad, from the outside he's kind of a self-absorbed, cheating husband and Dad. So the principle he's lived by -be creative - well, he doesn't seem to have applied it in the most positive way. Anyway, a quick read and glad to see someone else feels that everyone is creative, that creativity is not an exclusive concept to be lorded over the plebs.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    After reading Naomi Wolf for years, I still don't know if I think she is an arrogant pretentious soul or wise and insightful. This book, though quite annoying in spots, is mostly wonderful. Her father, Leonard Wolf, is a thoughtful and seemingly deliberately eccentric poet. Wolf is at a crossroads in her life and asks him for poetic advice, which he gives in the several chapters of the book. I'm not fully behind his insights, but I don't need to be. He is a deep thinker, and his insights are wor After reading Naomi Wolf for years, I still don't know if I think she is an arrogant pretentious soul or wise and insightful. This book, though quite annoying in spots, is mostly wonderful. Her father, Leonard Wolf, is a thoughtful and seemingly deliberately eccentric poet. Wolf is at a crossroads in her life and asks him for poetic advice, which he gives in the several chapters of the book. I'm not fully behind his insights, but I don't need to be. He is a deep thinker, and his insights are worth paying close attention to. For example, he says you should ignore everything except what you're passionate about. I think this is the sort of observation that men find easier to enact than women. They don't generally have the primary care for children and animals, which require committed attention even if you don't feel like it. But for a man, and a poet, it seems great. As someone who has tried to be competent at a number of things, from art, writing, and music to farming, teaching, and baking, I find Naomi Wolf's mid-life attempts to do carpentry and gardening a little eye-rolling. Shouldn't she already know this stuff? Apparently not. Following your passion seems to leave you blind to all the other things in the world. Well, good for her that she finally noticed. Anyway, despite the irritation that some of the passages arouse in my rather judgmental heart, and possibly because of that irritation, I like the book and would recommend it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Helen King

    Being upfront - I can see that some people might find this a little hokey (I might as well get that out of the way), especially if you are expecting the Naomi Wolf of, say, The Beauty Myth. It is not that sort of book. It's the book of someone who has spent her life firming up and arguing her positions (for good reasons) but now feels she has neglected a key part of herself - her 'heart' as she terms it - in the process. And we need both. So this book is essentially a tribute to her father, and Being upfront - I can see that some people might find this a little hokey (I might as well get that out of the way), especially if you are expecting the Naomi Wolf of, say, The Beauty Myth. It is not that sort of book. It's the book of someone who has spent her life firming up and arguing her positions (for good reasons) but now feels she has neglected a key part of herself - her 'heart' as she terms it - in the process. And we need both. So this book is essentially a tribute to her father, and the lessons he taught, Naomi Wolf weaves the lessons her father has taught to his students - and runs through with her as an woman in her 40s who is now open to the experiences he can share with her. I really enjoyed this book. I could relate to where she was coming from, I could see and appreciate her bravery in writing from a different mindset than she was used to, and learning in the process. The end product isn't perfect - but that's not really the point. It's getting closer to what matters. Many of these lessons are not particularly revolutionary but they serve as good reminders for a meaningful and enjoyable life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Really enjoyed this book. As the sub title suggests, it is about "seeing", living, and loving, and is a memoir of her father. And making a countryside refuge from an old long-abandoned house, away from New York City. And of course about building a treehouse. I'm keeping this one, going up on my shelf beside "The Beauty Myth" - a book that made a big impression on me back in my late 20's. Went to hear her speak at McGill university and had my copy signed - Mar 4, 1991. Really enjoyed this book. As the sub title suggests, it is about "seeing", living, and loving, and is a memoir of her father. And making a countryside refuge from an old long-abandoned house, away from New York City. And of course about building a treehouse. I'm keeping this one, going up on my shelf beside "The Beauty Myth" - a book that made a big impression on me back in my late 20's. Went to hear her speak at McGill university and had my copy signed - Mar 4, 1991.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Sowery-Quinn

    I love Wolf's writing and this book is a beautiful homage to her father and his way of thinking and how she wasn't ready to listen to it when she was younger. This is a book I could re-read in order to absorb some of her father's lessons. I love Wolf's writing and this book is a beautiful homage to her father and his way of thinking and how she wasn't ready to listen to it when she was younger. This is a book I could re-read in order to absorb some of her father's lessons.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fran Cormack

    Some books you look for. Some you find serendipitously. This was just that kind of book. Bought at a second hand stall in Leura, in the Blue Mountains. It is a little treasure trove of wisdom, and reflections on what it means to live a life well spent. I loved it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Pukar Subedi

    The Treehouse is a pleasant collection of life lessons on how to live, express one’s creativity and how to foster curiosity

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This book is a bit of a lecture, personal essay, and history lesson all rolled into one, with bright spots of great quotes and poetry. If you are a fan of Anne Lamott's "Bird by Bird" and other such writings on living as an artist/writer, you may feel that this is more of the same. However, is that a bad thing? Personally I find it encouraging to be reminded to "be still and listen", "do nothing without passion", and realize that "mistakes are part of the draft", (3 of the 12 "lessons" in this b This book is a bit of a lecture, personal essay, and history lesson all rolled into one, with bright spots of great quotes and poetry. If you are a fan of Anne Lamott's "Bird by Bird" and other such writings on living as an artist/writer, you may feel that this is more of the same. However, is that a bad thing? Personally I find it encouraging to be reminded to "be still and listen", "do nothing without passion", and realize that "mistakes are part of the draft", (3 of the 12 "lessons" in this book). This book reminded me to stop and breath for a moment. And, on top of that, this really is an endearing story. There are related sub-stories in the book about Wolf's friends, students and children, but the primary focus is on the author's realization that she wants to learn what her father Leonard Wolf (a poet and teacher) has been teaching to his students for years, and so over the course of a summer spent at her country house she allows her father to finally impart to her in a set of lessons what he has been teaching to her by example for years. I enjoyed that in the process of retelling these lesson-notes from her dad she explores the experiences between herself and her father as teachers, writers and parents. This leads to the book containing interesting information on the history of the arts in 20th century America, thoughtful critcism of market-thinking in arts education, and insights on parenting without letting children lose their creative spark. Her father's story and words are carefully played against Wolf's own life-path which she finds is more like her father's than her younger feminist-self would have wanted to admit. There are many honest and wise words in this book that resonated with me, and I believe others will find the same.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Charmin

    HIGHLIGHTS: 1. Someone speaking in his or her own voice-even if hardly anyone hears-changes the world much more profoundly than someone just getting elected president. 2. Speaking in their own voices, they become, if only for a moment, what they were put on earth to be. 3. Pay attention. If you feel that shadow of doubt in whatever you are doing, it is an important sign you are in the wrong place. Never ignore it. 4. My dad has been pursuing the permanent courtship of my mother since they met. 5. Cr HIGHLIGHTS: 1. Someone speaking in his or her own voice-even if hardly anyone hears-changes the world much more profoundly than someone just getting elected president. 2. Speaking in their own voices, they become, if only for a moment, what they were put on earth to be. 3. Pay attention. If you feel that shadow of doubt in whatever you are doing, it is an important sign you are in the wrong place. Never ignore it. 4. My dad has been pursuing the permanent courtship of my mother since they met. 5. Creative work really lets those you love to live forever. 6. If I was going to take the path that was beckoning me, I would have to be willing to be bad at something again. 7. No matter how much money your job pays, if it does not fire you up, you should leave immediately. 8. No matter how impractical or obscure another life task maybe, if you become passionate when you think about it, and talk about it—well, you had better change your priorities so that your life energies go in that direction. 9. The care and maintenance of your passion-in love, in work-should be your highest priority. 10. You need to really look at the end and not turn away from it or pretend it will happen, to understand the full story. In our culture, we pretend the ones we love will never die. Then so many people are distraught when someone they love dies because they never had the conversations they should have had and now it’s too late. That doesn’t have to happen; if you keep ‘the frame’ in mind at all times, if you face the fact that everyone you love will go someday—then those are the conversations you will be having with them every day.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a touching and inspiring compilation of advice from Naomi Wolf's father, and it pairs well with significant events and interactions in her adult life. Wolf examines the concept of living a creative life unharnessed by fear of rough drafts or the fact that all life ends one day. Wolf ties in some history of the post modern literary movement, and while it is informative and useful for the context of her influence and her father's life experience, I much more enjoyed reading about interacti This is a touching and inspiring compilation of advice from Naomi Wolf's father, and it pairs well with significant events and interactions in her adult life. Wolf examines the concept of living a creative life unharnessed by fear of rough drafts or the fact that all life ends one day. Wolf ties in some history of the post modern literary movement, and while it is informative and useful for the context of her influence and her father's life experience, I much more enjoyed reading about interactions with her dad. (Unfortunately, I took about 3 years or so to finish reading, so I'd probably need to reread it within a smaller span of time to get its full effect and thus provide a more clear review.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    "Leonard believes that inside everyone is an artist, and that happiness in life depends on valuing and acting upon one's creative impulse." I loved this book. I only gave it three stars because it is very simple and I would have appreciated it if she went more in depth with more examples from her father's life or stories. That said, it was exactly the kind of book I was looking for and I appreciated her father's guiding views on life. In our modern consumerist age, his wisdom is a welcome change "Leonard believes that inside everyone is an artist, and that happiness in life depends on valuing and acting upon one's creative impulse." I loved this book. I only gave it three stars because it is very simple and I would have appreciated it if she went more in depth with more examples from her father's life or stories. That said, it was exactly the kind of book I was looking for and I appreciated her father's guiding views on life. In our modern consumerist age, his wisdom is a welcome change.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kate Forster

    I had to slow down reading this book because I didn't want it to end. I also have a print out of Leonards lessons on my wall, where I can read it from my writing desk. It is a beautifully crafted piece of work for anyone who wants to live a creative life. Three narratives run through out the tale- Leonard's family history, his relationship with his daughter Naomi and the lessons themselves. None are boring. All are honest and compelling. It is a moving tribute and one I return to often when I need I had to slow down reading this book because I didn't want it to end. I also have a print out of Leonards lessons on my wall, where I can read it from my writing desk. It is a beautifully crafted piece of work for anyone who wants to live a creative life. Three narratives run through out the tale- Leonard's family history, his relationship with his daughter Naomi and the lessons themselves. None are boring. All are honest and compelling. It is a moving tribute and one I return to often when I need a top up of Leonard's view of life.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    Okay, so this books sounds a little sappy, and it totally is, but I have to admit i really loved it. I don't know if part of the connection for me was to this woman who is learning to see the wisdom in her aging father, something I struggle with a lot. I actually found her father's advice, filtered through her own words and insights, very useful, especially regarding finding one's voice and the need to make mistakes. Okay, so this books sounds a little sappy, and it totally is, but I have to admit i really loved it. I don't know if part of the connection for me was to this woman who is learning to see the wisdom in her aging father, something I struggle with a lot. I actually found her father's advice, filtered through her own words and insights, very useful, especially regarding finding one's voice and the need to make mistakes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

    This book really resonated w/me on many levels. The stories Naomi Wolf shares about her father and entertaining, and informative. It sounds like he was a truly happy individual, and that he knew how to listen to the poetry of the world, and the music of the universe. Hopefully, one day, I'll be able to say the same. This book really resonated w/me on many levels. The stories Naomi Wolf shares about her father and entertaining, and informative. It sounds like he was a truly happy individual, and that he knew how to listen to the poetry of the world, and the music of the universe. Hopefully, one day, I'll be able to say the same.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Suze

    I love Leonard Wolf's life view (inspiring!) and his lessons which this book is structured around. Current favourite lesson: Be Still and Listen. Quite a few good quotes that I wish I had noted down. I also like Naomi Wolf's writing style. However, I got bored in parts and skimmed some of it, especially towards the end. I love Leonard Wolf's life view (inspiring!) and his lessons which this book is structured around. Current favourite lesson: Be Still and Listen. Quite a few good quotes that I wish I had noted down. I also like Naomi Wolf's writing style. However, I got bored in parts and skimmed some of it, especially towards the end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    A great centering book. I recommend this book - and the Woodhull Institute, the organization Naomi Wolf cofounded. She shares both the wisdom she gained from her father that inspired her, and the transformative process of women inspiring women to achieve through connections made at Woodhull.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I'm really liking this book...she's self-reflective, dealing with her rigidity and anger, listening to her dad and his theories of humanism and art...while building a tree house for her daughter. She's still a bit self-righteous, but I still like it! I'm really liking this book...she's self-reflective, dealing with her rigidity and anger, listening to her dad and his theories of humanism and art...while building a tree house for her daughter. She's still a bit self-righteous, but I still like it!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evie

    i love this book. surely it's different to other wolf's books, but i found this book liberating. i love this book. surely it's different to other wolf's books, but i found this book liberating.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shruti Buddhavarapu

    Annoying as hell.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anamika

    A very inspiring book in which Naomi Wolf shares the teachings of her father on how to live, express your creativity, and follow your passion.

  22. 5 out of 5

    June Milner

    Wonderful father-daugter story. Like her style.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mativargas

    Lovely about what being a teacher is all about

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  26. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Stallings

  29. 4 out of 5

    Monica Bossinger

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marilia Chaves

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.