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HOME IS WHERE THE WAR IS   America may be reeling from endless recessions and crippling oil wars, but hack reporter Ben Walker never expected to see his homeland invaded and occupied by a reunified Korea—now a formidable world power under Kim Jong-il’s dictator son. The enemy’s massive cyberattack is followed by the detonation of an electromagnetic pulse that destroys tech HOME IS WHERE THE WAR IS   America may be reeling from endless recessions and crippling oil wars, but hack reporter Ben Walker never expected to see his homeland invaded and occupied by a reunified Korea—now a formidable world power under Kim Jong-il’s dictator son. The enemy’s massive cyberattack is followed by the detonation of an electromagnetic pulse that destroys technology across the United States. Communications, weapons, and defense systems are rendered useless; thousands perish as vehicles suddenly lose power and passenger jets plummet to the ground.  Fleeing the chaos of Los Angeles, Walker discovers that although America’s military has been scattered, its fighting spirit remains. Walker joins the soldiers as they head east across the desert, battling Korean patrols—and soon finds his own mission. Walker reinvents himself as the Voice of Freedom, broadcasting information and enemy positions to civilian Resistance cells via guerrilla radio.   But Walker’s broadcasts have also reached the ears of the enemy. Korea dispatches its deadliest warrior to hunt the Voice of Freedom and crush the ever-growing Resistance before it can mount a new war for American liberty.


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HOME IS WHERE THE WAR IS   America may be reeling from endless recessions and crippling oil wars, but hack reporter Ben Walker never expected to see his homeland invaded and occupied by a reunified Korea—now a formidable world power under Kim Jong-il’s dictator son. The enemy’s massive cyberattack is followed by the detonation of an electromagnetic pulse that destroys tech HOME IS WHERE THE WAR IS   America may be reeling from endless recessions and crippling oil wars, but hack reporter Ben Walker never expected to see his homeland invaded and occupied by a reunified Korea—now a formidable world power under Kim Jong-il’s dictator son. The enemy’s massive cyberattack is followed by the detonation of an electromagnetic pulse that destroys technology across the United States. Communications, weapons, and defense systems are rendered useless; thousands perish as vehicles suddenly lose power and passenger jets plummet to the ground.  Fleeing the chaos of Los Angeles, Walker discovers that although America’s military has been scattered, its fighting spirit remains. Walker joins the soldiers as they head east across the desert, battling Korean patrols—and soon finds his own mission. Walker reinvents himself as the Voice of Freedom, broadcasting information and enemy positions to civilian Resistance cells via guerrilla radio.   But Walker’s broadcasts have also reached the ears of the enemy. Korea dispatches its deadliest warrior to hunt the Voice of Freedom and crush the ever-growing Resistance before it can mount a new war for American liberty.

30 review for Homefront: The Voice of Freedom

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad Gilbert

    I don't normally write reviews, but I felt compelled in this case. I don't believe I have ever read a book fraught with so many technical errors and inconsistencies. I'm sorry, but a satellite cannot "hover" at 300 km. The amount of fuel this would require is incredibly large. We should also be thankful this author is not a radiologist (iron does you very little good when it comes to radiation). I thought this may be an oversight, but he repeated the error throughout the book. I don't normally write reviews, but I felt compelled in this case. I don't believe I have ever read a book fraught with so many technical errors and inconsistencies. I'm sorry, but a satellite cannot "hover" at 300 km. The amount of fuel this would require is incredibly large. We should also be thankful this author is not a radiologist (iron does you very little good when it comes to radiation). I thought this may be an oversight, but he repeated the error throughout the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    If only the actual video game could have been like the novel... Yes, it goes without saying, I did enjoy the novel a lot better than the game. (I haven't played the game in a long, long time but I can remember nothing memorable about it) I really liked how the novel explained further (that the game never did) about the "Greater Korean Republic" invasion of the United States of America including the collapse of the American society and economy and the poisoning of the Mississippi River by the GKP If only the actual video game could have been like the novel... Yes, it goes without saying, I did enjoy the novel a lot better than the game. (I haven't played the game in a long, long time but I can remember nothing memorable about it) I really liked how the novel explained further (that the game never did) about the "Greater Korean Republic" invasion of the United States of America including the collapse of the American society and economy and the poisoning of the Mississippi River by the GKP dividing the country. I also like how the novel was interlinked between both the protagonist (Ben Walker, a former L.A journalist turned resistance fighter and The Voice of Freedom) and antagonist's (Yi Dae-Hyun aka the Asian Viper, Salmusa, childhood friend of the GKP leader Kim Jong-un and overseer of the GKP invasion of the United States) points of view. Without spoilers the book does end with the direction going in that there will be a sequel to this novel somewhere down the line, perhaps when the Homefront 2 video game is released. I would definitely like to read it as I would like to see the continuation of Walker's and the resistance's story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Zombie0721

    For an original story based on a video game this book is really good. Not so much a gung ho military story but much more of a human drama with very well thought out and real characters. If you have any thoughts of playing the game read this book as an introduction to the world. For everyone else read it as a good piece of maybe not so fiction.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Benny

    It felt like I was reading a book written for someone ten years younger than me, and I'm only 16. Interesting concept, and the first third is captivating enough, but it fell apart after the initial hook wore off. It felt like I was reading a book written for someone ten years younger than me, and I'm only 16. Interesting concept, and the first third is captivating enough, but it fell apart after the initial hook wore off.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Devina

    Quite enjoyed this one. The concept of America having the tables turned on it was interesting, and the book always had something happening. Assuming, and hoping, there's a sequel to this one. Quite enjoyed this one. The concept of America having the tables turned on it was interesting, and the book always had something happening. Assuming, and hoping, there's a sequel to this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris The Lizard from Planet X

    Homefront: The Voice Of Freedom by Authors John Milius and Raymond Benson is Video Game Tie-in novel based on the world of THQ’s Homefront Video Game franchise. The Voice of Freedom serves as a prequel to the first person shooter, Homefront 1 Taking place in the mid 2020’s, America’s no longer a strong world power due to an economic crisis, out of control gas prices, and rampant unemployment. Civil unrest is prevalent throughout the country causing the US to take a step back from world affairs. Homefront: The Voice Of Freedom by Authors John Milius and Raymond Benson is Video Game Tie-in novel based on the world of THQ’s Homefront Video Game franchise. The Voice of Freedom serves as a prequel to the first person shooter, Homefront 1 Taking place in the mid 2020’s, America’s no longer a strong world power due to an economic crisis, out of control gas prices, and rampant unemployment. Civil unrest is prevalent throughout the country causing the US to take a step back from world affairs. Meanwhile, Kim Jong-Il’s son, Kim Jong-un has come to power by 2012 and actually improved North Korea considerably in the time between then and the current year in the book. The book does a great job explaining how North Korea eventually becomes the Greater Korean Republic and its eventual invasion and occupation of America through the use of a nuclear EMP detonation. The novel follows journalist Ben Walker from his pre-invasion life to his eventual emergence as “The Voice of Freedom” for the American Resistance. On the flip side, the reader also gets to follow a Korean Agent, named Salmusa who has ties to Jong-un and leads the invasion forces. Raymond Benson is the author for this one and I have to say I love his writing . Switching off between a traditional 3rd person writing style to a first person style, Homefront continues this trait with “Walker’s Journal” chapters. Here we get an inside look at what the main character is thinking, feeling, and events around the US all in a “diary” sort of format. It’s a fantastic aspect and really provides the reader a good look into the character. The novel moves at a quick pace highlighting Ben’s journey from his home in the Hollywood Hills, to his escape towards the east. Along the way he meets up with compelling characters, dangerous post-invasion dangers and even Resistance members from the first Homefront game. Eventually, Salmusa and Ben play a cat and mouse game as the Koreans are out to stop him from providing hope and intel to the rest of the Resistance and Americans across the nation through the use of radio broadcasting. The action is tense and more than once I found myself not wanting to stop reading. The book manages to paint a futuristic world that is extremely plausible, that I found myself thinking how I’d react in some of these situations. It’s a bit chilling to be honest. Overall, You honestly don’t have to be someone chomping at the bit to play Homefront or be an avid gamer to enjoy this book. With Benson’s writing style and the subject matter of the novel, you’ll be hooked and won’t want to put it down. You can tell great care and research went into this book as the post apocalyptic world portrayed in the book presents, while fictional, presents itself in a logical sort of way. If you’re into Homefront this it’s a must read easily. If you’re also someone who likes action thrillers or militaristic novels, you’ll also enjoy this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    JJ

    Homefront is a game that I still remember years later for a particularly exciting single-player campaign and story. So the opportunity to learn more about the world through the story of the resistance radio broadcaster called "The Voice of Freedom" promised to be an exciting time. However, I ended the book wondering if I was viewing the game's story through rose-colored glasses or if it was less artfully done than I had thought. Homefront: The Voice of Freedom is quite fine as a video game tie-in Homefront is a game that I still remember years later for a particularly exciting single-player campaign and story. So the opportunity to learn more about the world through the story of the resistance radio broadcaster called "The Voice of Freedom" promised to be an exciting time. However, I ended the book wondering if I was viewing the game's story through rose-colored glasses or if it was less artfully done than I had thought. Homefront: The Voice of Freedom is quite fine as a video game tie-in. It centers around a side character from the game, fleshing him out with his own set of motivations, a mission, and a supporting cast. You run into some other side characters that the protagonist of the game meets on their adventures. At the end, you probably have a somewhat greater appreciation for the world of Homefront than you did before. But the problem is that everything is so bluntly thrown into the novel that it can be distracting. Take, for example, the opening scenes where Ben Walker, the novel's protagonist, runs into the game's protagonist by sheer luck -- they have a conversation, it's never mentioned again, and it doesn't add anything to the story. It's not even a sly wink and nudge, it's just a "hey, look! it's the guy from the game!" moment that is totally useless in the context of the novel. Now, not all character appearances are like that. One technologically-inclined character from the game is integrated much more seamlessly. But the opening just stuck out right off the bat and put a bad taste in my mouth. There's also a distracting format of Ben Walker's journal that pops up sometimes. It reads totally inauthentically as a journal, and only serves to dump exposition. And the dumps don't stop there, either -- although some of the pages of exposition about wider-ranging geopolitical things are some of the more interesting parts of the book. You have to check your brain at the door when some of the details get glossed over to get to the setting of the game, but some world-building is better than none in my opinion. Finally, we get to see the perspective of one of the Korean leaders in America. This starts off well as he helps orchestrate the invasion, but we go long stretches without him in the later portions of the book and the Koreans become more and more cartoonishly evil -- maybe a little nuance would have been more interesting. Overall, there's nothing heinously wrong with Homefront: The Voice of Freedom. It's just an occasionally un-artful tie-in to a game that I remember being much more engaging when it came to story and world-building. The universe got re-booted and then abandoned, but if you're yearning for more of the original Homefront this is really your only option -- and you could do worse than picking this one up.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Nice literary companion for the video game. It gives some background to the success of the Korean invasion in the US and a glimpse of a bleak atmosphere in a world with a weakened US/West influence. A "Great Arab War" is being waged in Middle East and recession worse than the 1930s depression struck the United States that has caused even the most basic government services to shut down. Meanwhile in Asia, the reunification of both North Korea and South Korea has caused the ambitious North (now Gr Nice literary companion for the video game. It gives some background to the success of the Korean invasion in the US and a glimpse of a bleak atmosphere in a world with a weakened US/West influence. A "Great Arab War" is being waged in Middle East and recession worse than the 1930s depression struck the United States that has caused even the most basic government services to shut down. Meanwhile in Asia, the reunification of both North Korea and South Korea has caused the ambitious North (now Greater Korean Republic) to pursue expanding its territory in Japan and Southeast Asia. Having an interest in real world clandestine radio operations, the backdrop that protagonist intends to fight the Korean occupation force through radio broadcasting was a bonus. The book is fun to read, somewhat light and not very deep but still pretty interesting. There's an old Hollywood action movie feel to it and that's probably thanks to Milius. This is the Red Dawn remake I wanted to see.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    A good premise but overall I found it lacking in depth. The only character that I felt a connection with was the battle worn Knopp who was ill.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John S

    This book really deserves 2.5 stars but that's not an option and I just can't justify giving it 3 stars. Sure, there's an interesting premise, some pretty good characters, and the read is pretty fun, but the book is so obviously written for a younger audience. I understand if the authors and the publishers wanted to make the book more accessible to that crowd, but in any case I don't think they give the reader enough credit. At one point you find out there is a big secret between two of the main This book really deserves 2.5 stars but that's not an option and I just can't justify giving it 3 stars. Sure, there's an interesting premise, some pretty good characters, and the read is pretty fun, but the book is so obviously written for a younger audience. I understand if the authors and the publishers wanted to make the book more accessible to that crowd, but in any case I don't think they give the reader enough credit. At one point you find out there is a big secret between two of the main characters, but anybody with even a shred of insight knows what the secret is from the get go. Then it is referred to a few times, without being revealed, and finally in the last two lines of the book there is the big revelation... Except you've already known for a hundred pages what the secret was, you just wished there would be some sort of a twist and that you'd be wrong. Some parts were painfully predictable, which makes the book much less fun to read in my opinion. Everything is presented in a simple and straightforward manner, without much regard for style. Another instance where the book left me feeling insulted (although I don't really know why this bothered me soooo much) was when the author felt the need to describe the ingredients of a s'more. Ok, I think everybody who has had a childhood knows what a s'more is... Maybe this is just a case of overwriting and not necessarily a slight towards the reader, but either way it really ticked me off for some reason. There were some small problems that should've been picked up in editing also. For example, one sentence reads "Emergency services were pushed to the brim." Clearly, "brink" would've been a better fit. Another example has one character entering a "scolding" shower. Look, I understand if your shower is SCALDING, but if your shower is scolding you then you should get the hell out of demon house. Another instance has the word "soldiers" misspelled. Again, I know these are minor complaints, but these are things I tend to overlook in better books. They definitely stood out to me in this particular book. The story was enjoyable though, and my heart was racing as I was reading the final showdown. My only real complaint about the ending was that it lacked grandeur and importance compared to other instances in the book. Sure, the character achieved his final objective, but it seemed an almost arbitrary goal, or at very best just the beginning of a greater plan. If they plan on releasing a sequel, I won't be buying it. If the ending of the book somehow ties into the video game, that would be pretty cool. I guess time will tell. So, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in purchasing the game (which releases on March 15th) or anyone who is fascinated by the premise. Personally, I love post-apocalyptic books (which this isn't, technically, but it does feel like one at certain points.) and I did enjoy this book. It's a quick, fun, and easy read. Just don't expect it to be a great piece of literature, because you will be disappointed.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Asmodean

    Homefront: The Voice of Freedom is a good read. It isn't a ground breaking novel in any way, shape, or form. However it is a good diversion that will take you a few bus rides, one longer plane ride, or several hours to finish. I have to admit that the first two chapters right-out scared me. Homefront takes place in and around the years 2023-2025. It covers a fictitious future America that has been decimated by Economic hardship. The U.S. Military is a shadow of its former self. The citizens are Homefront: The Voice of Freedom is a good read. It isn't a ground breaking novel in any way, shape, or form. However it is a good diversion that will take you a few bus rides, one longer plane ride, or several hours to finish. I have to admit that the first two chapters right-out scared me. Homefront takes place in and around the years 2023-2025. It covers a fictitious future America that has been decimated by Economic hardship. The U.S. Military is a shadow of its former self. The citizens are suffering and starvation is rampant along with all manner of criminal activities. Due to the inability to repay debts owed, the Government withdraws from the world economy leaving a huge vacuum for any up and coming super power to fill. Enter North Korea. Through a peace treaty with South Korea, North Korea creates the Greater Korean Republic. As the U.S. weakens, the GKR attacks Japan. With U.S. unable to supply any type of support the Japanese fall and are incorporated into the GKR. In a few short years the GKR absorbs Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. The U.S. experiences a depression greater than that of the Great depression, unable to respond to the ever growing Korean threat. It is in the first few chapters that the basis of this fictitious future is explained. I must tell you that it is very scary indeed. I read with a real feeling of dread and foreboding as one scenario after another is put forward, each of which are predicated on real economic hardships of today. These chapters culminate in the invasion of the United States by the GKR. After such a powerful beginning however, the book reverts into standard fiction and though there are moments that are powerful and shocking, they do not carry the same emotional conviction of the first few chapters. Another positive for Homefront: The Voice of Freedom, are the characters. The main character is likable and though not entirely believable, sucks you into the story well enough that you care about him and those around him. There is one memorable character that is given a wonderful role and I couldn't help but like him. I would go out on a limb and say that he poses a real risk of overshadowing the main character, usually not a good thing. However he doesn't and the story moved with me invested into the life of the main character. I am now looking forward to the Video Game so that I can continue the fight against the GKR and free America from tyranny and slavery. IN SHORT Good book. Great characterization. Strong beginning based on very real scenarios of the possible future of the U.S.A.! Turns into a 24 style plot that is action packed however, not very believable. Overall I would give this book a strong C+ to B-.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alpha

    "As of late, video games have been doing multi-media releases. Tom Clancy's ENDWAR is a good example in which a prologue novel was written before video game release. THQ is following this same formula with their latest title Homefront for the PS3, PC, and X360. With most video game novels, the stories are usually based off the video game as compared to being a compliment. With this title, it should be original since it takes place before the game's events. I believe the book delivered just enough "As of late, video games have been doing multi-media releases. Tom Clancy's ENDWAR is a good example in which a prologue novel was written before video game release. THQ is following this same formula with their latest title Homefront for the PS3, PC, and X360. With most video game novels, the stories are usually based off the video game as compared to being a compliment. With this title, it should be original since it takes place before the game's events. I believe the book delivered just enough to be outstanding. With the help of John Milius, the writer for the story of the game as well as the screenplay writer for ""Apocalypse Now"" and ""Red Dawn"", a lot of the story has an integrity towards a dystopian outlook on the United States of America in which Korea has invaded and taken over most of the United States in a timespan less than one year. The story centers around Ben Walker, a journalist who writes in journals his accounts prior to the hostile takeover and life after. As time progresses, the story shows how Walker is transformed from the civilian life he was accustomed to to the life he has to now live on the run. Using his journalism skills, he writes events in his journal and also through the progression of the story, he becomes the Voice of Freedom, a man on the radio waves who encourages the remaining United States population to fight back the invading Koreans. The story itself is very good for what it is but there should also be notice that warfare on behalf of the Koreans are either very unorganized - probably due to taking on a broken country - and there are mistakes that are missed. The same goes on the United States side too. These are mistakes that in a regular war situation would be accounted for but probably for the sake of story or possibly the conditions given to the story, it is understandable. I would definitely suggest this title to video gamers who love to read, especially those who love first person shooters. Also those who like work by John Milius may like this novel too but since the events of the novel are happening before the events of the game, expect a somewhat conclusive cliffhanger if you do not intend to play the game right after."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abbe

    HOME IS WHERE THE WAR IS America may be reeling from endless recessions and crippling oil wars, but hack reporter Ben Walker never expected to see his homeland invaded and occupied by a reunified Korea—now a formidable world power under Kim Jong-il’s dictator son. The enemy’s massive cyberattack is followed by the detonation of an electromagnetic pulse that destroys technology across the United States. Communications, weapons, and defense systems are rendered useless; thousands perish as vehicle HOME IS WHERE THE WAR IS America may be reeling from endless recessions and crippling oil wars, but hack reporter Ben Walker never expected to see his homeland invaded and occupied by a reunified Korea—now a formidable world power under Kim Jong-il’s dictator son. The enemy’s massive cyberattack is followed by the detonation of an electromagnetic pulse that destroys technology across the United States. Communications, weapons, and defense systems are rendered useless; thousands perish as vehicles suddenly lose power and passenger jets plummet to the ground. Fleeing the chaos of Los Angeles, Walker discovers that although America’s military has been scattered, its fighting spirit remains. Walker joins the soldiers as they head east across the desert, battling Korean patrols—and soon finds his own mission. Walker reinvents himself as the Voice of Freedom, broadcasting information and enemy positions to civilian Resistance cells via guerrilla radio. But Walker’s broadcasts have also reached the ears of the enemy. Korea dispatches its deadliest warrior to hunt the Voice of Freedom and crush the ever-growing Resistance before it can mount a new war for American liberty.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Danny Hurtado

    Homefront The Voice of Freedom is based on the video game Homefront. This book takes places a little before the actual game. For those that don't know, Homefront is about the North Koreans attacking America with an EMP which caused all of electronics in North America to fail, which meant that we were doomed. Not having electricity, vehicles, or any electrical device to work, the whole country was in trouble. As the EMP was detonated, the North Koreans attacked us, thus giving us the name HomeFro Homefront The Voice of Freedom is based on the video game Homefront. This book takes places a little before the actual game. For those that don't know, Homefront is about the North Koreans attacking America with an EMP which caused all of electronics in North America to fail, which meant that we were doomed. Not having electricity, vehicles, or any electrical device to work, the whole country was in trouble. As the EMP was detonated, the North Koreans attacked us, thus giving us the name HomeFront. In the book Homefront The Voice of Freedom, it has a group or just normal civilians trying to survive while the North Koreans are attacking. Their use of attack is by being able to have a radio work and broadcast to the people that have old ham radios which weren't affected by the EMP. In the book they face problems the whole time and get into some huge conflicts. At the end of the book, you know there has to be another book since it ended with some questions. I would recommend this book but only for those that are interested in war fiction. I think it's meant more for fans of the game because it'll be easier to understand. Still, a good book and I think a lot of people would enjoy it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Schultz

    Some video games get the novel treatment but they usually continue a story at the end of the game. Homefront is the opposite where the novel sets the storyline of the video in a compelling way that tries to be serious but still feels very gimmicky. What I like about this book was you never wanted to put the book down. Even though the book is filled with corny jokes, enormous plot holes, repeating lines and debatable actualities (like EMP blast crippling electronics or making an entire river radio Some video games get the novel treatment but they usually continue a story at the end of the game. Homefront is the opposite where the novel sets the storyline of the video in a compelling way that tries to be serious but still feels very gimmicky. What I like about this book was you never wanted to put the book down. Even though the book is filled with corny jokes, enormous plot holes, repeating lines and debatable actualities (like EMP blast crippling electronics or making an entire river radioactive), the storyline was very compelling and believable. What I didn't like about Homefront (and why the book got two stars) was the story has a Hollywood movie-like storyline. When Ben Walker gets into trouble, he's always saved by something. Near death after getting beaten by gangs? Saved by an abandoned military base filled with supplies. Being chased by Korean military? Saved by a National Guard convoy. This goes on through the entire book. And it cheapens the plot. What will be interesting to see if the ending of the book sets - or has any connection to - the storyline for Homefront 2, the sequel to the first video game set to be released in 2015. Judging by the leaked plot of Homefront 2 with a new character, it doesn't look like it will.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Patrick

    So this is the second video game tie-in book I have read this year for a game I have never played. I was interested in the story of the game which revolves around a near future America that has been invaded by North Korea mainly because of its roots are in the original (and soon to be released remake) Red Dawn which is one of my favorite patriot movies from the 80's. Ah the 80's movies, when America was top dog and our chief export was one man armies on missions to stamp down the enemies of free So this is the second video game tie-in book I have read this year for a game I have never played. I was interested in the story of the game which revolves around a near future America that has been invaded by North Korea mainly because of its roots are in the original (and soon to be released remake) Red Dawn which is one of my favorite patriot movies from the 80's. Ah the 80's movies, when America was top dog and our chief export was one man armies on missions to stamp down the enemies of freedom. While I liked the idea of the book, and they only missed predicting the death of Kim Jong Il by a few months, I was surprized by how hollow the book seemed. The book is told half in journal entries by the "Voice of Freedom" and half in standard narrative of the main character Ben and the Leader of the Korean Occupation force. In both modes of storytelling it seems like very little story is actually told. The book ends one a very open plot point or payoff that was either intended to come in the game or in another novel. Did I enjoy reading it, ya. Would I recommend it to anyone not nostalgic for the glory days of USA versus Commies, probably not.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I was not expecting much from this video game tie-in novel, but I was pleasantly surprised and tore through this book in 2 days. I couldn't put it down. North Korea's rise to dominance (led by a charismatic Kim Jong-un) on the heel's of America's economic downturn is a little far-fetched IMHO, but it makes for a great read. BUT if you did want to take down the US of A, then this would be the way to do it. I have yet to play the video game so I can't tell whether the book makes the video game bett I was not expecting much from this video game tie-in novel, but I was pleasantly surprised and tore through this book in 2 days. I couldn't put it down. North Korea's rise to dominance (led by a charismatic Kim Jong-un) on the heel's of America's economic downturn is a little far-fetched IMHO, but it makes for a great read. BUT if you did want to take down the US of A, then this would be the way to do it. I have yet to play the video game so I can't tell whether the book makes the video game better or if the video makes the book better. Either way, I hope they come out with more novels to continue the story (though I doubt in this world of Halo, Gears and Call of Duty that they'd even make a Homefront sequel). Nonetheless, it's an exciting page turner and this generation's "Red Dawn" (actually, the novel was written by the minds behind "Red Dawn").

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Read on my nook. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this one. Video game novels have become something of a guilty pleasure for me, especially prequel novels. I like how they can introduce you to the setting and characters of a game before you start to play it, and add meat to the bones of the game's story. Usually, though, they just aren't very good. This book won't win any awards, but it's exciting, interesting, and fairly well-written. It does a great job of filling in the blanks between th Read on my nook. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this one. Video game novels have become something of a guilty pleasure for me, especially prequel novels. I like how they can introduce you to the setting and characters of a game before you start to play it, and add meat to the bones of the game's story. Usually, though, they just aren't very good. This book won't win any awards, but it's exciting, interesting, and fairly well-written. It does a great job of filling in the blanks between the current day and the Korean-run America of the video game. Now I just can't wait to actually play the game!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kay Smillie

    I have never heard of the video game and, quite frankly, lost interest in video games at Asteroids. Video games are for children. Enjoyed this vision of the USA brought back many decades after an EMP bomb which leads to an invasion by a reunited Korea. The USA was in the doldrums with very few of the military overseas leaving it vulnerable and resulted in Korea invading the west coast of America. Small groups of resistance exist and they have a voice in Ben Walker. One of the better invasion of U I have never heard of the video game and, quite frankly, lost interest in video games at Asteroids. Video games are for children. Enjoyed this vision of the USA brought back many decades after an EMP bomb which leads to an invasion by a reunited Korea. The USA was in the doldrums with very few of the military overseas leaving it vulnerable and resulted in Korea invading the west coast of America. Small groups of resistance exist and they have a voice in Ben Walker. One of the better invasion of USA novels. Ray Smillie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Scott Vout

    A book my son read and was laying around the house so i gave it a try. An interesting concept - Korea, the new super power invades the USA and takes over. Some engaging characters, especially Wally. A not unbelievable story, based on a video game. Definately set up for a sequal. I enjoyed the story and look forward to the sequal. Dont think i will be worrying too much about the video game though.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Mcmillen

    I've been on a kick lately in reading adaptations of games as a kind of alternative history. I'm really only asking for an interesting, plausible story. Homefront gives us the premise of, "What would happen if the US completely forgets it has thousands of nuclear weapons?" Stupid, inane and any other "turrible" adjectives. DO NOTbuy or play this game - the writers must be punished!!! :-) I've been on a kick lately in reading adaptations of games as a kind of alternative history. I'm really only asking for an interesting, plausible story. Homefront gives us the premise of, "What would happen if the US completely forgets it has thousands of nuclear weapons?" Stupid, inane and any other "turrible" adjectives. DO NOTbuy or play this game - the writers must be punished!!! :-)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Lawson

    I am very happy with this novel. It's sad to say that it is WAY better then the video game, as we all know the video game had a lot more money thrown at it. It sucked me in and had some tense moments throughout. 4 stars for making me want to tell everyone of my friends to read this. I'm looking to see if there is a sequel!! I am very happy with this novel. It's sad to say that it is WAY better then the video game, as we all know the video game had a lot more money thrown at it. It sucked me in and had some tense moments throughout. 4 stars for making me want to tell everyone of my friends to read this. I'm looking to see if there is a sequel!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kasper

    I was curious about the game, and ended up reading this book. I really liked the setting, and it sparked my imagination, but somehow I was not totally conviced by the narrative. It had a kind of Hollywood-movie feel to it, not convincing enough for me. Many plots and turn were good, but the way it went down could have been more "realistic", even for a fiction. I was curious about the game, and ended up reading this book. I really liked the setting, and it sparked my imagination, but somehow I was not totally conviced by the narrative. It had a kind of Hollywood-movie feel to it, not convincing enough for me. Many plots and turn were good, but the way it went down could have been more "realistic", even for a fiction.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Keith Parker

    Held along the lines of a Fallout series. I feel i've heard this before, but it was inventive and interesting for the most part. The book turned out better than the game i guess, but it's not the best story for realism. The biggest draw for me was the backstory. Held along the lines of a Fallout series. I feel i've heard this before, but it was inventive and interesting for the most part. The book turned out better than the game i guess, but it's not the best story for realism. The biggest draw for me was the backstory.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Loren

    An interesting and scary look at the world of homefront. A good story on its own travelling through the broken continent. I can't wait for the game An interesting and scary look at the world of homefront. A good story on its own travelling through the broken continent. I can't wait for the game

  26. 4 out of 5

    Legend

    Excellent, a good read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jens Andersen

    Good read, not the best ever - but does a good job at describing the scenario of a Korean invasion and how people would react. This made me play the game even more.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Marie

    More of a 3.5. The story was great and very plausible. The writing was so-so as was the dialogue, but the plot was one that stuck with me. I don't think I would play the game, though! More of a 3.5. The story was great and very plausible. The writing was so-so as was the dialogue, but the plot was one that stuck with me. I don't think I would play the game, though!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Boivin

    Bit hard to read sometimes, but it was a good book. It's interesting to see a little more of the characters from the game. Not really sure where the game fits in the timeline. Bit hard to read sometimes, but it was a good book. It's interesting to see a little more of the characters from the game. Not really sure where the game fits in the timeline.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    This is my favorite of books by Raymond Benson. He has perfected the narrative style, but the plot was totally believable and very, very creepy. I'm really looking forward to the sequel. This is my favorite of books by Raymond Benson. He has perfected the narrative style, but the plot was totally believable and very, very creepy. I'm really looking forward to the sequel.

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