web site hit counter Being-In-The-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being in Time, Division I - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Being-In-The-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being in Time, Division I

Availability: Ready to download

Being-in-the-World is a guide to one of the most influential philosophical works of this century: Division I of Part One of Being and Time, where Martin Heidegger works out an original and powerful account of being-in-the-world which he then uses to ground a profound critique of traditional ontology and epistemology. Hubert Dreyfus's commentary opens the way for a new appr Being-in-the-World is a guide to one of the most influential philosophical works of this century: Division I of Part One of Being and Time, where Martin Heidegger works out an original and powerful account of being-in-the-world which he then uses to ground a profound critique of traditional ontology and epistemology. Hubert Dreyfus's commentary opens the way for a new appreciation of this difficult philosopher, revealing a rigorous and illuminating vocabulary that is indispensable for talking about the phenomenon of world. The publication of Being and Time in 1927 turned the academic world on its head. Since then it has become a touchstone for philosophers as diverse as Marcuse, Sartre, Foucault, and Derrida who seek an alternative to the rationalist Cartesian tradition of western philosophy. But Heidegger's text is notoriously dense, and his language seems to consist of unnecessarily barbaric neologisms; to the neophyte and even to those schooled in Heidegger thought, the result is often incomprehensible. Dreyfus's approach to this daunting book is straightforward and pragmatic. He explains the text by frequent examples drawn from everyday life, and he skillfully relates Heidegger's ideas to the questions about being and mind that have preoccupied a generation of cognitive scientists and philosophers of mind.


Compare

Being-in-the-World is a guide to one of the most influential philosophical works of this century: Division I of Part One of Being and Time, where Martin Heidegger works out an original and powerful account of being-in-the-world which he then uses to ground a profound critique of traditional ontology and epistemology. Hubert Dreyfus's commentary opens the way for a new appr Being-in-the-World is a guide to one of the most influential philosophical works of this century: Division I of Part One of Being and Time, where Martin Heidegger works out an original and powerful account of being-in-the-world which he then uses to ground a profound critique of traditional ontology and epistemology. Hubert Dreyfus's commentary opens the way for a new appreciation of this difficult philosopher, revealing a rigorous and illuminating vocabulary that is indispensable for talking about the phenomenon of world. The publication of Being and Time in 1927 turned the academic world on its head. Since then it has become a touchstone for philosophers as diverse as Marcuse, Sartre, Foucault, and Derrida who seek an alternative to the rationalist Cartesian tradition of western philosophy. But Heidegger's text is notoriously dense, and his language seems to consist of unnecessarily barbaric neologisms; to the neophyte and even to those schooled in Heidegger thought, the result is often incomprehensible. Dreyfus's approach to this daunting book is straightforward and pragmatic. He explains the text by frequent examples drawn from everyday life, and he skillfully relates Heidegger's ideas to the questions about being and mind that have preoccupied a generation of cognitive scientists and philosophers of mind.

30 review for Being-In-The-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being in Time, Division I

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary Beauregard Bottomley

    I bought this book used. I noticed that only the first 10 pages or so had underlining or highlights in it. That's too bad. I love reading other peoples notes while I read a book. It also means that at least one person started the book and couldn't finish it. My guess is this book can act as a stand alone replacement to the book "Being and Time". The author does a good job at appropriating the Heideggerian neologisms and putting a context around them, and repeating their meanings so that with a d I bought this book used. I noticed that only the first 10 pages or so had underlining or highlights in it. That's too bad. I love reading other peoples notes while I read a book. It also means that at least one person started the book and couldn't finish it. My guess is this book can act as a stand alone replacement to the book "Being and Time". The author does a good job at appropriating the Heideggerian neologisms and putting a context around them, and repeating their meanings so that with a detailed reading of this book you really get to understand why Heidegger is worth mastering. There is no Truth that underlines our being. Dasein is that which takes a stand on its own being, and our Worldliness (for-the-sake-of-which, toward-which, purpose) does not arise from the deep reflection that the 2500 year old philosophical tradition as expressed by Descarte and the tradition that followed him would say it does. This book will put all that and more into understandable prose. We are thrown in to the world, our care creates who we are, our coping allows us to understand with our falling and affectedness, and most of all 'the they' (i.e. others, people society, norms, or as this author says, 'the one') gives us our Daseining (being human). Idle chatter, curiosity and ambiguity leads towards our uprootedness and cut off from our authentic selves. Cultural relativism is not a possibility within Heidegger because of the universality of Dasein and its interaction to the one (a hammer is a tool with no reflection or a door knob is for opening a door until there is a breakdown of some kind). The last chapter, chapter 15 tells the reader why Heidegger is so important. It read as if it was a summary of two chapters from "Philosophy of Science" edited by Kurd since it used the same concepts as expoused in some of those essays. The appendix of this book, summarizes Division II (temporality). Now I know why I stumbled my way through that section in B&T. Heidegger borrows heavily from Kierkegaard, and later on in life Heidegger backs away from his meaning and importance of anxiety in developing authentic Dasein because he knows it was not the right way to think about authentic Dasein. Both those things are not obvious when you read B&T. I want to be explicit in my recommendation for this book. One can read this book and never read B&T itself and understand what it is all about and really won't be cheated. Though, I definitely would recommend that all people should suffer through B&T at least once in life. I was going to re-read this book, but after I had finished it I would skim a section and realized that I pretty much understood what the author was saying.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Feliks

    A powerhouse. Like running a half-marathon for your brain. Of Heidegger's various commenters, Dreyfus is certainly the most advanced and the most comprehensive. He fearlessly wades down into the rushes and tubers; sifting every shell and shard. Dreyfus was apparently a correspondent with MH in his undergraduate days; and he has sublime mastery of the German language. He's not always the most enjoyable to read; a few chapters drew from me a frown. But most of them were searingly, blazingly, good. A powerhouse. Like running a half-marathon for your brain. Of Heidegger's various commenters, Dreyfus is certainly the most advanced and the most comprehensive. He fearlessly wades down into the rushes and tubers; sifting every shell and shard. Dreyfus was apparently a correspondent with MH in his undergraduate days; and he has sublime mastery of the German language. He's not always the most enjoyable to read; a few chapters drew from me a frown. But most of them were searingly, blazingly, good. WHEW. Exhausting. If you don't know Heidegger yet and you despair that human life seems hopelessly muddled and inchoate, stick your toe in these waters. You may find in him, the clarity you seek.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Didn't go into this book as a big Heidegger fan. Probably because my relationship with Heidegger was based on reading an old shoddy translation of Being and Time, which Dreyfus shows to be flawed. Again, I had just read Dreyfus' Foucault book, and was blown away by it. I had high expectations because Dreyfus is considered one of the pre-eminent Foucault/Heidegger scholars in America (even though he died almost a decade ago) and it lived up to my expectations. I now want to re-read Being and Time Didn't go into this book as a big Heidegger fan. Probably because my relationship with Heidegger was based on reading an old shoddy translation of Being and Time, which Dreyfus shows to be flawed. Again, I had just read Dreyfus' Foucault book, and was blown away by it. I had high expectations because Dreyfus is considered one of the pre-eminent Foucault/Heidegger scholars in America (even though he died almost a decade ago) and it lived up to my expectations. I now want to re-read Being and Time! Perhaps I'll teach Heidegger's Being and Time along with this book as a secondary text for a class... could be interesting. Probably better suited for an upper level existentialism/phenomenology course, or for graduate students.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    A lucid exposition of the first division of Being and Time... and beyond! This book was a huge help in "getting" Heidegger, who can be difficult. Dreyfus has such a thorough understanding of what Heidegger was trying to get at that he sometimes supplements BT with his own arguments where Heidegger falls short. This could seem like Dreyfus is reading into the text sometimes, but from what I can gather from what I've read of BT itself, Dreyfus is pretty spot on, and as far as I know, nobody has an A lucid exposition of the first division of Being and Time... and beyond! This book was a huge help in "getting" Heidegger, who can be difficult. Dreyfus has such a thorough understanding of what Heidegger was trying to get at that he sometimes supplements BT with his own arguments where Heidegger falls short. This could seem like Dreyfus is reading into the text sometimes, but from what I can gather from what I've read of BT itself, Dreyfus is pretty spot on, and as far as I know, nobody has anything much better on offer. I'm very glad to have come across this book. Heidegger's thought, as expounded by Dreyfus, has had a huge impact on me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Charles. S

    The reason this review comes out so late is because I read the "Being and Time" together with some other introductions simultaneously with this and did not finish the appendix until last night, which is something I would recommend instead of only reading this book and just glimpsing trough BT. Even though I have read some pretty harsh critiques of this book I must say that besides from Dreyfus own comments on the application of Heideggerian philosophy on AI (something I am not going to talk about The reason this review comes out so late is because I read the "Being and Time" together with some other introductions simultaneously with this and did not finish the appendix until last night, which is something I would recommend instead of only reading this book and just glimpsing trough BT. Even though I have read some pretty harsh critiques of this book I must say that besides from Dreyfus own comments on the application of Heideggerian philosophy on AI (something I am not going to talk about here about which Rlotz has covered up pretty much in his review, the book is pretty useful. Although the book has some simplified charts and a couple of "this is what Heidegger REALLY means", but besides that it do not fail to give a good description and Heideggers thought and terminology. I would recommend it to someone interested in Heideggers early philosophy that is willing to read other secondary literature. When it comes to the appendix I am glad I read it. It has a great overview of the Heidegger Kirkegaard relation and gave a little intro to Heideggers later thought.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chant

    This book certainly cleared up some misconceptions about Heidegger and might give me a fighting chance with actually finishing BT. 2018 reread: I must say that this book is a fantastic primer for reading BT, however, if that being said it is not a replacement for the actual book. The book clears up some misconceptions that I've had but maybe that's just the Dreyfus take on Heidegger, nonetheless, it was a great read and will consult it in the future for my BT needs. This book certainly cleared up some misconceptions about Heidegger and might give me a fighting chance with actually finishing BT. 2018 reread: I must say that this book is a fantastic primer for reading BT, however, if that being said it is not a replacement for the actual book. The book clears up some misconceptions that I've had but maybe that's just the Dreyfus take on Heidegger, nonetheless, it was a great read and will consult it in the future for my BT needs.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Taka

    A MUST-have if reading Being and Time

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zo

    Fantastic commentary and exposition. Played a crucial role in making the work itself more intelligible for me. Most of my uncertainties about the value of Heidegger's work itself carries over to this reading of the work, and so I wish Dreyfus pushed further at various points, but the points where he does critique Heidegger are valuable for making more concrete what avenues to critique are open. I would be curious where other readings of Being-and-Time differ from this one. There were a few point Fantastic commentary and exposition. Played a crucial role in making the work itself more intelligible for me. Most of my uncertainties about the value of Heidegger's work itself carries over to this reading of the work, and so I wish Dreyfus pushed further at various points, but the points where he does critique Heidegger are valuable for making more concrete what avenues to critique are open. I would be curious where other readings of Being-and-Time differ from this one. There were a few points where the quotes Dreyfus used to support his reading didn't seem quite to fit together, but most of the time this was highly revealing. My biggest complaint is probably that the last section on Heidegger's account of how one should be given his "analytic of Dasein" doesn't really address the Nazism at all, even at points where it seemed highly relevant to me. Still, this is a valuable and helpful resource, that can be inspiring and fascinating in its own right.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    Take notes. And try to read it every day. That's all I can say. It's like trying to read an encyclopaedia backwards and upside down: It can be done, but retaining it is difficult. Still, having read Dreyfus' interpretation of Heidegger, I can understand now how existentialists like R.D. Laing could better treat their patients; how Camus created Meursault; how Beaudelaire was interpreted by Sartre. Take notes. And try to read it every day. That's all I can say. It's like trying to read an encyclopaedia backwards and upside down: It can be done, but retaining it is difficult. Still, having read Dreyfus' interpretation of Heidegger, I can understand now how existentialists like R.D. Laing could better treat their patients; how Camus created Meursault; how Beaudelaire was interpreted by Sartre.

  10. 4 out of 5

    M

    Absolutely indispensable for understanding Being and Time. Dreyfus is an incredible scholar and interpreter of Heidegger, making the strange topology of Heidegger’s magnum opus traversable and intelligible with a clearness of prose and depth of intellect that one cannot help but be awed at.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Zu

    only read the passages useful to me

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    chapters 3/4 division I being and time

  13. 5 out of 5

    Risto Saarelma

    via https://meaningness.com/further-reading https://srconstantin.wordpress.com/20... via https://meaningness.com/further-reading https://srconstantin.wordpress.com/20...

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Williamson

    ‘Being in the world’ by Hubert Dreyfus is probably the best starting point when trying to access the difficult and demanding work of Martin Heidegger (he maybe for some the only point worth taking in which to make contact with the ‘enigmatic’, or perhaps arid, Heidegger, depending upon your own open head turned towards the world, or attunement). Dreyfus himself tends to play down the importance of this book, claiming aspects of it are wrong, short sighted or confusing. With the exception of Heid ‘Being in the world’ by Hubert Dreyfus is probably the best starting point when trying to access the difficult and demanding work of Martin Heidegger (he maybe for some the only point worth taking in which to make contact with the ‘enigmatic’, or perhaps arid, Heidegger, depending upon your own open head turned towards the world, or attunement). Dreyfus himself tends to play down the importance of this book, claiming aspects of it are wrong, short sighted or confusing. With the exception of Heidegger’s concept of ‘Death’ being a little vague and some of Dreyfus’ terminology can be misleading (according to him more so), I can’t really find much to fault it with. Although I may be slightly biased as I am a rather big fan of Dreyfus’ work via I-Tunes podcasts from UC Berkley ranging from Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Existentialism, Greek Tragedy, etc. Dreyfus writes clearly for such a minefield of a topic as Existential Phenomenology and Heidegger, the only reason for re-reading the text in general is because of the subject matter and not Dreyfus’ telling of Dasein taking a stance on itself, as existence, as being. The only real let down is Division 2 of this book, which is actually not Dreyfus’ fault as Heidegger handed in a rushed account of it to gain tenure, and the comparison with Kierkegaard does tend to make it a little less confused and gives some strong opposition to Heidegger’s thoughts on how to live an authentic life. All in all, I would recommend this book to anybody with an ounce of curiosity and intelligence.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Billie Pritchett

    Hubert Dreyfus' Being-In-The-World is one of the best secondary sources on Martin Heidegger's great philosophical works Being and Time. For readers who find Heidegger's book a challenge (and it is), Dreyfus' book makes the experience a whole lot easier. The only reason why I can't give Dreyfus' book five stars, however, is because sometimes I wonder if Dreyfus correctly interprets Heidegger in some areas. Here's a concrete example. Dreyfus says that one of the great things that Heidegger showed i Hubert Dreyfus' Being-In-The-World is one of the best secondary sources on Martin Heidegger's great philosophical works Being and Time. For readers who find Heidegger's book a challenge (and it is), Dreyfus' book makes the experience a whole lot easier. The only reason why I can't give Dreyfus' book five stars, however, is because sometimes I wonder if Dreyfus correctly interprets Heidegger in some areas. Here's a concrete example. Dreyfus says that one of the great things that Heidegger showed is that for human beings, practical activity precedes reasoning about something. So according to Heidegger, we go through most of our day not consciously thinking about what it is we're doing. We open the door, walk outside, go to work, and don't even (have to) stop to think about what it is we're doing. Our normal functioning mode is a kind of auto-pilot. Now, I think this all is true so far as it goes but then Dreyfus takes this practical attitude that human beings have as evidence for the fact that there's nothing going on in the brain that allows for such practical processing. So neither are there computational/algorithmic processes going on in the head nor are there Intentional processes (like we're acting from wants and thoughts about the world). Aside from looking on the face of it false, this seems like an unnecessary axe to grind, and perhaps an issue that Heidegger wouldn't have been concerned with. Other than that, it's a fantastic, fantastic, fantastic book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John

    I found Dreyfus' insights to be very helpful in breaking down and explaining the complex language that Heidegger uses throughout Being and Time. Dreyfus also draws from many of Heiddeger's other works in order to make sense out of some of the ideas Heidegger introduces in Being and Time. In addition, Dreyfus uses concrete modern examples in order to provide greater clarity on some of Heidegger's more abstract ideas. Also, I found Dreyfus' command of the German language to be helpful in providing I found Dreyfus' insights to be very helpful in breaking down and explaining the complex language that Heidegger uses throughout Being and Time. Dreyfus also draws from many of Heiddeger's other works in order to make sense out of some of the ideas Heidegger introduces in Being and Time. In addition, Dreyfus uses concrete modern examples in order to provide greater clarity on some of Heidegger's more abstract ideas. Also, I found Dreyfus' command of the German language to be helpful in providing alternative choices in wording than some of the popular English translations of Being and Time. T This helped me to have a better understanding of the work, overall. Dreyfus also provided valuable insight on Kiekergaard and Nietszche' influence on Heidegger's philosophy. Furthermore, Dreyfus explains how big of an influence Heidegger has had on his successors, such as Sartre; Dreyfus makes clear that Sartre misunderstood several important aspects of Heidegger's philosophy. These inaccuracies had a significant impact on recent philosophy (Existentialism, Being and Nothingness). However, I would argue that Heidegger's unnecessarily complex use of language led itself to such misunderstandings. That being said, this book is essential for anyone who is trying to make sense of Heidegger's philosophy, especially those interested in Being and Time. Also, its a critical piece pertaining to the origins of Existentialism and postmodern philosophy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Renxiang Liu

    The author focuses on Division One (existential analysis). The foremost contributions of this commentary is 1) its regulation of the translation of certain terms; 2) its outline, with vivid examples and abundant textual evidences (some are from newly-published lecture courses of Heidegger), of Heidegger's breakthrough with the concepts of Vorhandenheit and Zuhandenheit, which exceeds the so-called "practical turn"; and 3) its dialogue with contemporary analytical philosophers such as John Searle The author focuses on Division One (existential analysis). The foremost contributions of this commentary is 1) its regulation of the translation of certain terms; 2) its outline, with vivid examples and abundant textual evidences (some are from newly-published lecture courses of Heidegger), of Heidegger's breakthrough with the concepts of Vorhandenheit and Zuhandenheit, which exceeds the so-called "practical turn"; and 3) its dialogue with contemporary analytical philosophers such as John Searle. Generally, the book provides a starting point for those who cannot sufficiently grasp the meaning between the lines of the original text; yet its shortcoming lies precisely in the fact that this perspective is heavily influenced by the author's own theoretical concerns. On the one hand, his understanding of Husserl is not tenable at all, equating him to Descartes or Searle without grasping the genuine thrust of phenomenology. On the other hand, he mistakenly believes that Heidegger's doctrine on fallenness can be distinctly divided into the ontological and the psychological sense, and accordingly that he can preserve the former without the latter. However, for Heidegger, the avoidance of authenticity is not a psychological event, but rather an "always already so" that is discovered too late. This neglect of the temporality of Gewesenheit is also evident in Dreyfus' avoidance of Division Two.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jared Colley

    This is a great tool and resource for any student seeking to conquer Heidegger's influential magnum opus. Dreyfus takes you through section-by-section, offering informative and rigorous analysis. What I really like about this book is Dreyfus' effort to resist re-appropriating Heidegger back into the English-speaking, Anglo philosophical tradition. Yes, he makes reference to thinkers like Donald Davidson and John Searle during certain discussions, but he remains faithful to Heidegger's own projec This is a great tool and resource for any student seeking to conquer Heidegger's influential magnum opus. Dreyfus takes you through section-by-section, offering informative and rigorous analysis. What I really like about this book is Dreyfus' effort to resist re-appropriating Heidegger back into the English-speaking, Anglo philosophical tradition. Yes, he makes reference to thinkers like Donald Davidson and John Searle during certain discussions, but he remains faithful to Heidegger's own project - which is something inherently opposed to English-speaking Analysis. Oddly enough, Dreyfus fails to be so cautious in his other popular commentary on Foucault - a book that ultimately disappoints while this one surprisingly succeeds. The book's only shortcoming is announced in its very title; this is an investigation into "Division 1" of the book. There is no thorough treatment of the latter division; however, there is a great essay elaborating its themes and such. If you feel like chewing on some Heidegger, this will wash it down with a sense of refreshed understanding. God I love my metaphors....

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    I'm told this commentary helps immensely with understanding Heidegger, and I'm already a fan of Dreyfus. Just started reading this (it's my potty reading-- though it just graduated to coffee shop reading) and am enjoying it. Was too intimidated to start reading Being and Time, but the commentary actually seems to stand alone pretty well-- especially since I've read and heard so much about Heidegger's thought that the commentary is basically just going through and clarifying things I've heard bef I'm told this commentary helps immensely with understanding Heidegger, and I'm already a fan of Dreyfus. Just started reading this (it's my potty reading-- though it just graduated to coffee shop reading) and am enjoying it. Was too intimidated to start reading Being and Time, but the commentary actually seems to stand alone pretty well-- especially since I've read and heard so much about Heidegger's thought that the commentary is basically just going through and clarifying things I've heard before. I strongly recommend Dreyfus, even if you've read Being and Time before and thought you understood it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eric Lee

    An extremely helpful commentary on the first division of Heidegger's Being and Time, which served as a helpful after-the-fact guide after I had finished reading Being and Time for the first time. The discussions of phenomenology and Dreyfus' colleague Searle help to illuminate much of what Heidegger is getting at in his difficult work. In addition, Dreyfus' appendix on Kierkegaard is really interesting and I thought even more insightful than the main body of the commentary itself! An extremely helpful commentary on the first division of Heidegger's Being and Time, which served as a helpful after-the-fact guide after I had finished reading Being and Time for the first time. The discussions of phenomenology and Dreyfus' colleague Searle help to illuminate much of what Heidegger is getting at in his difficult work. In addition, Dreyfus' appendix on Kierkegaard is really interesting and I thought even more insightful than the main body of the commentary itself!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    weirdly seems to become more and more 'concise' as chapter #s increase. I think it's actually hard to get a sense of Being and Time from reading this book -- Dreyfus does a good job talking about each of the component phenomena of Being but fails to give a sense of the unity that is so important to the Heidgarian project. Nonetheless, a great appendix to Being and Time, and he has interesting ideas about the translation in Macquarrie and Robinson weirdly seems to become more and more 'concise' as chapter #s increase. I think it's actually hard to get a sense of Being and Time from reading this book -- Dreyfus does a good job talking about each of the component phenomena of Being but fails to give a sense of the unity that is so important to the Heidgarian project. Nonetheless, a great appendix to Being and Time, and he has interesting ideas about the translation in Macquarrie and Robinson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Giovanni Generoso

    Thanks for the help digesting Division I of Heidegger's *Being and Time,* Dreyfus. Your insights were very useful and, honestly, instrumental in disclosing to me the new world which Heidegger has opened for me, that is, my Being-in-the-world. While there is nothing quite like reading the actual text itself, reading your commentary along with BT was extremely beneficial. Thanks for the help digesting Division I of Heidegger's *Being and Time,* Dreyfus. Your insights were very useful and, honestly, instrumental in disclosing to me the new world which Heidegger has opened for me, that is, my Being-in-the-world. While there is nothing quite like reading the actual text itself, reading your commentary along with BT was extremely beneficial.

  23. 5 out of 5

    S

    Really stellar secondary literature—pulls out a lot of semimystical mumblings of Heidegger's and twists them mightily into cogent theses, Dreyfus assessing as he goes. His work on Div II is pretty interesting as well, given the mess that Div II is, and the strategy that Dreyfus takes with regard to it is pretty brilliant. Really stellar secondary literature—pulls out a lot of semimystical mumblings of Heidegger's and twists them mightily into cogent theses, Dreyfus assessing as he goes. His work on Div II is pretty interesting as well, given the mess that Div II is, and the strategy that Dreyfus takes with regard to it is pretty brilliant.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Combining this book with Michael Gelven's own Commentary on the both divisions opens up Heidegger's mind with incredible clarity and intention. Its paragraph by paragraph analysis offers a tremendously thorough guide. Combining this book with Michael Gelven's own Commentary on the both divisions opens up Heidegger's mind with incredible clarity and intention. Its paragraph by paragraph analysis offers a tremendously thorough guide.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven Wright

    Its hard to hide my enthusiasm for this book. Many of us philosophers live a life of the mind, this book written in a hurried fashion in 1927 along with the work of Jose y ortegra casset to show what it means to live in the world, and what bodily knowledge of a world looks like

  26. 4 out of 5

    Steven Fowler

    This is the best introduction to start off with Heidegger's Being & Time. Though this 1st edition has some mistakes that Prof. Dreyfus intends to address in a rumored 2nd edition, it is probably the clearest and simplest introduction to Being & Time that remains true to the source. This is the best introduction to start off with Heidegger's Being & Time. Though this 1st edition has some mistakes that Prof. Dreyfus intends to address in a rumored 2nd edition, it is probably the clearest and simplest introduction to Being & Time that remains true to the source.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    The best place to start when searching for secondary authors on Being-and-Time. Easy to read. Good explanations of Heideggerian terminology. Next would come works by William Blattner, Taylor Carman, and Daniel Dahlstrom to name a few.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aaron May

    I love this book. Dreyfus does a great job describing the core elements of Being and Time division I. I also found that the generous amount of diagrams made it easier to connect the dots when several related concepts were being discussed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Markwell

    Hubert L. Dreyfus' work on Heidegger's Being and Time is a must read for anyone looking to encounter Heidegger. While Dreyfus does substitute his own vocabulary (over the already fairly specific vocabulary of Heidegger) his over all work on Heidegger is excellent. Hubert L. Dreyfus' work on Heidegger's Being and Time is a must read for anyone looking to encounter Heidegger. While Dreyfus does substitute his own vocabulary (over the already fairly specific vocabulary of Heidegger) his over all work on Heidegger is excellent.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Samson Blackwell

    The best explication of Heidegger's thought that I've found. Does its best to make sense out of seeming nonsense. The best explication of Heidegger's thought that I've found. Does its best to make sense out of seeming nonsense.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.