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Run Like A Girl is about the impact that participating in sports has on women—how the confidence and strength that it helps to build makes us stronger and better prepared for life's many challenges. In this inspiring book, Mina Samuels uses the personal stories of women and girls of all ages and backgrounds—as well as her own—to take a broad look at the power sports have t Run Like A Girl is about the impact that participating in sports has on women—how the confidence and strength that it helps to build makes us stronger and better prepared for life's many challenges. In this inspiring book, Mina Samuels uses the personal stories of women and girls of all ages and backgrounds—as well as her own—to take a broad look at the power sports have to help us overcome obstacles in all arenas of life. Run Like A Girl includes the stories of a US-ranked amateur triathlete who's raising an autistic son; a thirteen-year-old girl who falls in love with cross-country running; a woman who runs her first marathon at age sixty; an investment banker who quit her job to become a yoga teacher and adopt a daughter on her own; a young mother with scoliosis who cycled her way back to health and became a jewelry designer along the way; and countless other women—including Kathrine Switzer, Rebecca Rusch, and Molly Barker—who have been changed by their experiences with sports. Run Like A Girl argues that physical strength lends itself to psychological strength, and that for many women, participating in sports translates into leading a happier, more fulfilling life.


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Run Like A Girl is about the impact that participating in sports has on women—how the confidence and strength that it helps to build makes us stronger and better prepared for life's many challenges. In this inspiring book, Mina Samuels uses the personal stories of women and girls of all ages and backgrounds—as well as her own—to take a broad look at the power sports have t Run Like A Girl is about the impact that participating in sports has on women—how the confidence and strength that it helps to build makes us stronger and better prepared for life's many challenges. In this inspiring book, Mina Samuels uses the personal stories of women and girls of all ages and backgrounds—as well as her own—to take a broad look at the power sports have to help us overcome obstacles in all arenas of life. Run Like A Girl includes the stories of a US-ranked amateur triathlete who's raising an autistic son; a thirteen-year-old girl who falls in love with cross-country running; a woman who runs her first marathon at age sixty; an investment banker who quit her job to become a yoga teacher and adopt a daughter on her own; a young mother with scoliosis who cycled her way back to health and became a jewelry designer along the way; and countless other women—including Kathrine Switzer, Rebecca Rusch, and Molly Barker—who have been changed by their experiences with sports. Run Like A Girl argues that physical strength lends itself to psychological strength, and that for many women, participating in sports translates into leading a happier, more fulfilling life.

30 review for Run Like a Girl: How Strong Women Make Happy Lives

  1. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Souza

    I was surprisingly disappointed with this book. I purchased it because a percentage of the proceeds would go to Girls on the Run, and I thought it would be a positive enjoyable read.  Unfortunately, it was neither positive, nor enjoyable. First, the tone of the book really frustrated me. It’s written in a very familiar gossip girly tone – which was sadly catty and negative even though the entire story was supposed to be about being positive in our girlhood. I think the author was going for a “cof I was surprisingly disappointed with this book. I purchased it because a percentage of the proceeds would go to Girls on the Run, and I thought it would be a positive enjoyable read.  Unfortunately, it was neither positive, nor enjoyable. First, the tone of the book really frustrated me. It’s written in a very familiar gossip girly tone – which was sadly catty and negative even though the entire story was supposed to be about being positive in our girlhood. I think the author was going for a “coffee hour girl talk” tone, but it just didn’t work – or I hate girls. For example, “Need proof? Hello Barbie, you iconic every-girl’s-fantasy doll. Did you know your plastic proportions, if applied to a regular woman, would result in a freakish being around seven feet tall, weighing a hundred pounds, with an eighteen inch waist. Beautiful? Not!”  (pg. 147 - the punctuation error was in the book). Though she was trying to talk about how body image is negatively influenced by the media, she spent the next several pages talking about ‘normal’ women, who all happened to be at least 5’8, and 110 lbs or less. Is that normal? At the end of each chapter, the gossip girl tone was interrupted with an excessively whimsical portrayal of some event in her life (not always sports related) – like “My mind empties. I’m watching as the water falls away from the side of my paddle, like a stream slipping over rocks, flat cascades running sideways away from the paddle with each stroke.” (pg. 45) The difference in tone was jarring. The novel was also poorly edited, with several errors in the Introduction alone.  I can also say conclusively, that the author’s favorite word is deleterious. It was used to the point of annoyance. However, the most frustrating part was the need to add additional sports into the mix, when the book was called RUN like a girl. I felt like the author needed kudos because she does triathlons, marathons, biking, cross-country skiing, yoga, rock climbing, kayaking, snowshoeing, and hiking (yes, it actually says that on the back jacket). I understand the desire to open it up to women who are generally active in a variety of channels, but it was excessive to continuously repeat “Whether you’re competing in triathlon, marathon, biking, cross-country skiing, yoga, rock climbing, kayaking, canoeing, snowshoeing, or hiking….” throughout the book . Overall, I walked away from this book feeling annoyed, and frustrated with the negative tone - not inspired, motivated, or proud of running like a girl.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kimmie

    A very inspiring book with a writing style that irked me in a lot of places. It motivated me to get off the couch, but also motivated me to edit the flow of the book in my head. I didn't really care for how the people in the book were introduced in an early chapter, and then were referred back to in later chapters by some sort of gimmick (like: "remember our friend the tire-changing lady?" -- yes, for the fourth time, I remember her. But now I just think about her as the tire-changing lady.). For A very inspiring book with a writing style that irked me in a lot of places. It motivated me to get off the couch, but also motivated me to edit the flow of the book in my head. I didn't really care for how the people in the book were introduced in an early chapter, and then were referred back to in later chapters by some sort of gimmick (like: "remember our friend the tire-changing lady?" -- yes, for the fourth time, I remember her. But now I just think about her as the tire-changing lady.). For the most part, it's awesome to read books on women and athletics that are authored by women, so definitely pick this up if you want inspiration to get started or keep going.

  3. 5 out of 5

    momruncraft

    It only took a few pages for me to feel as though I'd been transported back to one of my favorite classes at Cal: Sociology of Sport. We learned about the commodification of athletes, discussed gender roles, and debated requirements of student athletes. Having learned many of my greatest life lessons on the sport's field, much of the class was easily relatable to my life or things I'd been through, making much of the class content immediately tangible. It only took a few more pages for me to real It only took a few pages for me to feel as though I'd been transported back to one of my favorite classes at Cal: Sociology of Sport. We learned about the commodification of athletes, discussed gender roles, and debated requirements of student athletes. Having learned many of my greatest life lessons on the sport's field, much of the class was easily relatable to my life or things I'd been through, making much of the class content immediately tangible. It only took a few more pages for me to realize this book was nowhere near the text I thought it would be. Written in a conversational tone, the author's poorly quoted research and platitudes weaken what could be a very inspirational read. With the title, Run Like a Girl, I expected a book about running that would provide me with personal stories of how running inspired, motivated, changed the lives of others...not so much. In fact, there is very little text about running itself. I'll save you a trip to the library or $16.95 and share the main premise of this book: * sports can be incredibly empowering to women. Where a woman's strength can be questioned in various other realms of her life, she can rediscover, find, or uncover her own strength in sport. Having discovered running relatively late in life, after the birth of my second child, I expected a great deal from this book. I have seen first hand just how much sports, and running in particular, can in fact empower a woman. Training for a half marathon taught me more about myself than any other single endeavor. Finishing my first half marathon ranks up there with one of the most memorable days of my life. The ladies who joined me for the journey, a journey we had no idea would impact us so greatly or forge a bond so deep, will be lifelong friends. Extremely disappointing book. I read through page 100 and skimmed the rest. I highly recommend Run Like a Mother or Mile Markers if you are looking for an inspirational running read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bibliovoracious

    A bit of not-so-distant history lessons on female breakthroughs in sport, a bit of inspirational anecdote from women athletes, and a bit of personal memoir from the author. I couldn't put it down, it's so readable and dynamic and spot-on re. the emotional challenges and rewards of being a woman in motion. And Mina, I think you showed Mr. E (or should I say, "chicked" him - across the finish line of transformative success;) A bit of not-so-distant history lessons on female breakthroughs in sport, a bit of inspirational anecdote from women athletes, and a bit of personal memoir from the author. I couldn't put it down, it's so readable and dynamic and spot-on re. the emotional challenges and rewards of being a woman in motion. And Mina, I think you showed Mr. E (or should I say, "chicked" him - across the finish line of transformative success;)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I feel dreadful marking this book as "read." I really, really wanted to love this book. I love running, I love feminism, I love empowerment. This book was more of a memoir/cheerleader/collection of famous people saying shit that meant something to the author randomly strung together and it made no sense. See that last sentence? Imagine an entire book of that, but interspersed with "snippets" from said sentence. Please to allow me to elaborate (fictitiously of course): Running is a mind-game. Your I feel dreadful marking this book as "read." I really, really wanted to love this book. I love running, I love feminism, I love empowerment. This book was more of a memoir/cheerleader/collection of famous people saying shit that meant something to the author randomly strung together and it made no sense. See that last sentence? Imagine an entire book of that, but interspersed with "snippets" from said sentence. Please to allow me to elaborate (fictitiously of course): Running is a mind-game. Your mind has to be focused, intent on your breathing, your feet moving left and then right and then left again, unless of course you find the "zen-moment" to just lose yourself. I do this frequently while listening to music. You've got to lose yourself in the music, the moment, you own it, you gotta never let it go..." -Eminem Blah blah blah blah. Yes, it was like that. I kept hoping it would improve but by chapter 3, I gave up...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hoffman Brauman

    Incredible, powerful, moving. I've never thought of myself as athletic, let alone an athlete. A lifetime of not participating in anything sports related -- in fact spending a great deal of effort avoiding participating in anything sports related was the norm for me. When I started running a few years ago, I had no idea how profoundly it would impact my life and how I define myself. Now I look forward to the opportunity, not just to run, but to pursue other sports as well. I'm comfortable being u Incredible, powerful, moving. I've never thought of myself as athletic, let alone an athlete. A lifetime of not participating in anything sports related -- in fact spending a great deal of effort avoiding participating in anything sports related was the norm for me. When I started running a few years ago, I had no idea how profoundly it would impact my life and how I define myself. Now I look forward to the opportunity, not just to run, but to pursue other sports as well. I'm comfortable being uncomfortable -- and that has opened the door to so many great adventures and friendships. This book covers so many of the topics that are central to life -- balance, friendship, self-image, aging -- it's a thought provoking read and one that is relevant to women and men, athletes and athletes-in-waiting. Highly recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This book is ridiculous. Why on earth would you thank Roe v. Wade in a running book? What does abortion have to do with running. What an incredibly poor choice in trying to mix a controversial political issue and something positive for women like running. I'm so disappointed that I spent money on this book as a gift and it will be returned. DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK AND SUPPORT THINGS LIKE THIS! This book is ridiculous. Why on earth would you thank Roe v. Wade in a running book? What does abortion have to do with running. What an incredibly poor choice in trying to mix a controversial political issue and something positive for women like running. I'm so disappointed that I spent money on this book as a gift and it will be returned. DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK AND SUPPORT THINGS LIKE THIS!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Ok, so I only read 1/2 of it. B/c it's a library book and I had to take it back. BUT! this would make a great bathroom book. By "bathroom book" I mean that it it's anecdotal in nature so it can be read in short spurts (and those kinds of books are fantastic for your bathroom bookshelf). It's also inspirational if you are looking for some motivation for your daily sports goals. Ok, so I only read 1/2 of it. B/c it's a library book and I had to take it back. BUT! this would make a great bathroom book. By "bathroom book" I mean that it it's anecdotal in nature so it can be read in short spurts (and those kinds of books are fantastic for your bathroom bookshelf). It's also inspirational if you are looking for some motivation for your daily sports goals.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Sue Cahill

    Hated it. Just hated it. Refuse to finish it & might actually ask for a refund.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nakoia

    After reading this book, I laced up my tennis shoes and started training again. If you want a book to motivate you to start running again, this is it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jana Viktoria

    This book is quite a nice little pep-talk - not only for women on the run, but for every woman. (I guess even men could use it at times...) Having read and loving Running: A Love Story: 10 Years, 5 Marathons, and 1 Life-Changing Sport I try to compare the two... Now while Jen A. Miller wrote about her personal relationship with running, Mina Samuels is doing more of a survey. Having spoken to a lot of (?!?!!) women, she supports all of her points not only by science but also by little episodes a This book is quite a nice little pep-talk - not only for women on the run, but for every woman. (I guess even men could use it at times...) Having read and loving Running: A Love Story: 10 Years, 5 Marathons, and 1 Life-Changing Sport I try to compare the two... Now while Jen A. Miller wrote about her personal relationship with running, Mina Samuels is doing more of a survey. Having spoken to a lot of (?!?!!) women, she supports all of her points not only by science but also by little episodes and anecdotes. Best thing about them? Most of the women are not elite athletes but just "normal people" - aka much more relatable (though admittedly a bit less exciting to read...). The style is easy and casual. The research is fair (while of course a bit dated by now...) and the messages are clear and very comforting... Good book for anyone who - in times of COVID19 or any time basically - wants to get (back) to (outdoor) sports or revisit their motives and goals. Great relationship builder! I might want to try karate now (do they have youtube tutorials or online classes?)... And I seriously crave a running buddy (but that might be COVID19).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Al

    I am all for books that empower women and that are about physical activity, but this was not the book I expected it to be. There were a couple of things that really irritated me, which is unfortunate because it takes away from the overall message the book is trying to send. I would recommend (and rather have read) a book that is more informed by research and doesn't have the personal perspective. 1) The way the book is written: The overly chatty, rah rah, love everyone, girl power, informal tone I am all for books that empower women and that are about physical activity, but this was not the book I expected it to be. There were a couple of things that really irritated me, which is unfortunate because it takes away from the overall message the book is trying to send. I would recommend (and rather have read) a book that is more informed by research and doesn't have the personal perspective. 1) The way the book is written: The overly chatty, rah rah, love everyone, girl power, informal tone was off putting. There was also quotes taken from the text and put into a block quote text with an image of a woman running from the front cover. This made it seem juvenile and didn't add anything to the experience. 2) At times some serious issues seemed to be brought up, but then not really gotten into or just skimmed over. At one point a woman who had serious back issues was discussed and how she spent months recovering by putting herself through lots of painful exercises. The "you can do anything" message was circulated with this, by this could have serious implications for other individuals. 3) Throughout the book there were various sections that spoke about relationships and finding partners. Not only did this boil my blood because my own physical activity should not revolve around my partner's, but because this book was EXTREMELY HETERONORMATIVE. Every example talked about a man, boyfriend, husband, etc. Would not recommend.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stella Duncan

    Run like a girl by Mina Samuels is about the impact that participating in sports has on women and how the confidence and strength that it helps to build spills over into all of our experiences, making us stronger and better prepared for lifes many challenges. I didn't end up finishing the book as there was a point in the book where I couldn't understand what they were talking about as there was words I didn't recognise. Overall I would give this book 2 stars because I didn't really understand it Run like a girl by Mina Samuels is about the impact that participating in sports has on women and how the confidence and strength that it helps to build spills over into all of our experiences, making us stronger and better prepared for lifes many challenges. I didn't end up finishing the book as there was a point in the book where I couldn't understand what they were talking about as there was words I didn't recognise. Overall I would give this book 2 stars because I didn't really understand it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle Schartner

    Quote from book. “The women on her team go from strangers to bridesmaids in a matter of months, incorporating each other into their lives as if they’d known each other for ages.” Maybe I loved the above quote so much because of my passion for the outdoors, staying in shape and close relationships. The book wasn’t exactly an “easy” read, but I did love reading about resilient and tenacious women in the outdoors / sports world.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erasmis Kidd

    Mina is a good story teller - she shares tales of kickass women doing kickass things and isn’t confined by a strict narrative. She returns to the women time and time again as elements of their stories become relevant and poignant. I felt like I knew them all by the end of the book and, what’s more, felt like I was one of them. The strong ladies in this book are now my friends (even though they don’t know it). Highly recommend.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kendall Concini

    #readingchallenge2019 (my book with an R) When it comes to books about running, everyone recommends reading Born to Run, however now having read both, I full heartedly feel this novel inspires running, covers the woes, and educates in a more well-rounded approach. Samuels relayed the impacts of participating in sports through the concept of confidence, strength, and struggles-while mainly focusing on specifically how women prepare for the challenges and rewards of all. She was a great story telle #readingchallenge2019 (my book with an R) When it comes to books about running, everyone recommends reading Born to Run, however now having read both, I full heartedly feel this novel inspires running, covers the woes, and educates in a more well-rounded approach. Samuels relayed the impacts of participating in sports through the concept of confidence, strength, and struggles-while mainly focusing on specifically how women prepare for the challenges and rewards of all. She was a great story teller, providing examples from real women for motivation! Reading about women overcoming, presented positive messages with a lot of great affirmations. I also really appreciated the section on body image, positivity, and eating disorders. It helped address individual discovery. I loved this book for many reasons, it wasn’t ‘life changing’ but it did help provide a perspective of celebration, fitness, and push yourself!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nagashree

    It was interesting to read how sports has assisted women with their struggles in finding their identity. I do admit that i had to take multiple breaks to have the right frame of mind to enjoy reading about stories of other women. This book has definitely inspired me to take care of my body when I had given up on wanting to be as physically active as I am now. All said, I still believe in moderation.

  18. 5 out of 5

    E

    Got to ~page 75. Too all over the places.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leonie Schenkel

    I didn’t enjoy reading this book, it was quite disappointing. I missed a read thread, I felt the author just gathered a whole bunch of examples of stories about the women she met in her life. I had to force myself to finish it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Foster

    This book is very motivating and has lots of great advice for runners but also for women athletes in general. Hearing story after story of women overcoming things that could have stopped a running dream but didn't, is very inspiring. I also love how the author is able to describe the specific things in her life that helped her become the runner she is today. All in all I just love stories of anyone, male or female, getting from one point in life to another after being told they cant do it. This This book is very motivating and has lots of great advice for runners but also for women athletes in general. Hearing story after story of women overcoming things that could have stopped a running dream but didn't, is very inspiring. I also love how the author is able to describe the specific things in her life that helped her become the runner she is today. All in all I just love stories of anyone, male or female, getting from one point in life to another after being told they cant do it. This book has loads of these stories! The part of the book I didn't like was the disjointed writing style. It was hard for me to get through some of the chapters because it didn't seem like they flowed at all. I am not the best writer by a long shot, but I do love to read and when I book doesn't seem to flow it makes reading a little harder. I resolved this issue getting to me by just reading a chapter a night. I overall liked the message the book was presenting and was happy to have the chance to read it!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Renee

    A bit disappointing. The author is definitely long winded and a bit too perky...like Stepford Wives kind of perky. The reader is led to believe that the book will be filled with inspirational stories about all kinds of different women, like a Chicken Soup For The Soul kind of collection, when, in reality, the author hogs up most of the pages with her own personal stories and crusades. The few stories about other women are very brief and all of the subjects she chose would be hard to relate to un A bit disappointing. The author is definitely long winded and a bit too perky...like Stepford Wives kind of perky. The reader is led to believe that the book will be filled with inspirational stories about all kinds of different women, like a Chicken Soup For The Soul kind of collection, when, in reality, the author hogs up most of the pages with her own personal stories and crusades. The few stories about other women are very brief and all of the subjects she chose would be hard to relate to unless you've been an athlete for most of your life. I found myself wishing that the author would just stop talking about herself so much and move on to someone else, but when that did happen, it was just a let down. Nonetheless, I was still able to take away a lot of positive messages from this and I appreciate what the author was trying to convey, even if it wasn't executed very well.

  22. 4 out of 5

    DW

    Though this book is non-fiction, it aims for inspirational rather than informational. The excessively cheerful tone and general lack of content made reading it felt disgustingly like bingeing on candy. Then I hurt my elbow and the cheerful encouragement helped me feel better while I wasn't training . . . Unlike anther reviewer here, I appreciated that the author talked about sports other than running ... in fact, I was sort of annoyed because of the implication that running marathons and triathlo Though this book is non-fiction, it aims for inspirational rather than informational. The excessively cheerful tone and general lack of content made reading it felt disgustingly like bingeing on candy. Then I hurt my elbow and the cheerful encouragement helped me feel better while I wasn't training . . . Unlike anther reviewer here, I appreciated that the author talked about sports other than running ... in fact, I was sort of annoyed because of the implication that running marathons and triathlons are the pinnacle of being a sportswoman.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I shudder to think what this manuscript must have looked like before an editor got their hands on it. The writing is terrible. I wish it were better, but it's flat-out bad. Is it memoir? Research-based nonfiction? Inspirational piece? The author has no clue, and so it is none of these things, instead it's cliche after cliche, bad prose and terrible transitions, little fact and too many unsupported quotes from "inspirational" women. I wanted to read a good book about running for women. This is no I shudder to think what this manuscript must have looked like before an editor got their hands on it. The writing is terrible. I wish it were better, but it's flat-out bad. Is it memoir? Research-based nonfiction? Inspirational piece? The author has no clue, and so it is none of these things, instead it's cliche after cliche, bad prose and terrible transitions, little fact and too many unsupported quotes from "inspirational" women. I wanted to read a good book about running for women. This is not that book, nor is it good, or really about women running.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy Moritz

    A well-crafted work which combines personal stories of the author with women who have discovered their own strength and joy through running and other athletic pursuits. It is inspirational and thoughtful. I particularly enjoyed her discussions on identity and the mind-body connection. The book explores topics including balance and relationships and has an emphasis on living with intention. The phrase used throughout the book "How we move is who we are" is both descriptive and provocative. A well-crafted work which combines personal stories of the author with women who have discovered their own strength and joy through running and other athletic pursuits. It is inspirational and thoughtful. I particularly enjoyed her discussions on identity and the mind-body connection. The book explores topics including balance and relationships and has an emphasis on living with intention. The phrase used throughout the book "How we move is who we are" is both descriptive and provocative.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

    I started reading this book after seeing the author on the Colbert Report. I really enjoyed reading it in bits and pieces - not straight through like a plot-driven story. I can relate to many of the ideas presented in the book - balance; how my form(s) of exercise are therapy and help me become a better mom/wife/daughter/etc.; the camaraderie of group exercise; exercise keeps me healthy, fit and feeling younger. This is one I might go purchase for myself as a reference tool.

  26. 5 out of 5

    ♥Meagan♥

    I found this book to be inspiring and interesting. It made me proud to be a runner and female. It also reminded me of things that I should know. I loved learning about all the positive ways that sports impact women's lives. I was also really happy with hearing the other women's stories. Reading about them made it more real. I would definitely recommend this book for any woman who is thinking about becoming active, wants to become active, or is active. It will change the way you view sports. I found this book to be inspiring and interesting. It made me proud to be a runner and female. It also reminded me of things that I should know. I loved learning about all the positive ways that sports impact women's lives. I was also really happy with hearing the other women's stories. Reading about them made it more real. I would definitely recommend this book for any woman who is thinking about becoming active, wants to become active, or is active. It will change the way you view sports.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    I don't know why, but I expected more from this book. I anticipated that there would be more full stories about women athletes, instead of little snippets scattered throughout the book to make the author's points. There were a couple of gems in this book and it provided me with some extra motivation at a time when my running motivation was low but I wouldn't highly recommend it or suggest it as a must-read - even for women runners. I don't know why, but I expected more from this book. I anticipated that there would be more full stories about women athletes, instead of little snippets scattered throughout the book to make the author's points. There were a couple of gems in this book and it provided me with some extra motivation at a time when my running motivation was low but I wouldn't highly recommend it or suggest it as a must-read - even for women runners.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I like this book. Basically it was about how running or any other sport can help women with confidence and help them complete other goals in their lives. There was a chapter regarding the science part of running which I found interesting. I didn't know that running secretes dopamine which is in comparison to morphine. Dopamine creates that all over good feeling that makes you want to run more and more. Anyone who is into running or any other sports, this is a good/interesting book. I like this book. Basically it was about how running or any other sport can help women with confidence and help them complete other goals in their lives. There was a chapter regarding the science part of running which I found interesting. I didn't know that running secretes dopamine which is in comparison to morphine. Dopamine creates that all over good feeling that makes you want to run more and more. Anyone who is into running or any other sports, this is a good/interesting book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Smith

    this book was ok. Although it had inspiring stories in it, I had a hard time getting through it for a few reasons - (1) it was more about female athletes in general rather than predominantly runners, (2) the righting style was rough to get through, and (3) the author talked a lot about her own personal triumphs as a new author as a simile to running. This just wasn't the book I was expecting to read based on the synopsis I originally read. this book was ok. Although it had inspiring stories in it, I had a hard time getting through it for a few reasons - (1) it was more about female athletes in general rather than predominantly runners, (2) the righting style was rough to get through, and (3) the author talked a lot about her own personal triumphs as a new author as a simile to running. This just wasn't the book I was expecting to read based on the synopsis I originally read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This is a great read. Really great, actually. It's not a book out running, per se, but it's a book about women who choose to run. And women who choose to ski, climb rocks, etc. It's about women who choose to rise about the status quo and power through their athleticism (and various road blocks) to excel at the sports of their choosing. With a lot of great affirmation that we should be proud of our accomplishments! This is a great read. Really great, actually. It's not a book out running, per se, but it's a book about women who choose to run. And women who choose to ski, climb rocks, etc. It's about women who choose to rise about the status quo and power through their athleticism (and various road blocks) to excel at the sports of their choosing. With a lot of great affirmation that we should be proud of our accomplishments!

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