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Kevin Smith's Green Hornet Volume 1 Signed, Limited Edition Hc

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The Green Hornet is back and Dynamite is the new home for the avenging hero and his faithful sidekick, Kato and the Black Beauty! And things kick off with a BANG! as Dynamite debuts Kevin Smith's unproduced Green Hornet film, featuring the one and only origin of the Green Hornet and Kato. Collecting issues #1-5, along with a complete cover gallery. Signed by Kevin Smith! L The Green Hornet is back and Dynamite is the new home for the avenging hero and his faithful sidekick, Kato and the Black Beauty! And things kick off with a BANG! as Dynamite debuts Kevin Smith's unproduced Green Hornet film, featuring the one and only origin of the Green Hornet and Kato. Collecting issues #1-5, along with a complete cover gallery. Signed by Kevin Smith! Limited to a total of 1,500 copies.


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The Green Hornet is back and Dynamite is the new home for the avenging hero and his faithful sidekick, Kato and the Black Beauty! And things kick off with a BANG! as Dynamite debuts Kevin Smith's unproduced Green Hornet film, featuring the one and only origin of the Green Hornet and Kato. Collecting issues #1-5, along with a complete cover gallery. Signed by Kevin Smith! L The Green Hornet is back and Dynamite is the new home for the avenging hero and his faithful sidekick, Kato and the Black Beauty! And things kick off with a BANG! as Dynamite debuts Kevin Smith's unproduced Green Hornet film, featuring the one and only origin of the Green Hornet and Kato. Collecting issues #1-5, along with a complete cover gallery. Signed by Kevin Smith! Limited to a total of 1,500 copies.

30 review for Kevin Smith's Green Hornet Volume 1 Signed, Limited Edition Hc

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Honestly? I could give a fuck about the Green Hornet. I picked this up because it was on sale for five bucks at the local comic shop and because I saw that Kevin Smith had written it. Simply said, I enjoyed the hell out of it. It was funny and clever. It had good, snappy dialogue. (As you'd expect from Kevin Smith.) Best of all, it didn't require me to know 30 years of backstory about the main character to enjoy it. So. Five stars. Honestly? I could give a fuck about the Green Hornet. I picked this up because it was on sale for five bucks at the local comic shop and because I saw that Kevin Smith had written it. Simply said, I enjoyed the hell out of it. It was funny and clever. It had good, snappy dialogue. (As you'd expect from Kevin Smith.) Best of all, it didn't require me to know 30 years of backstory about the main character to enjoy it. So. Five stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eric Mikols

    I like a good legacy, torch passing (Batman Beyond, Mask of Zorro, ect.) so the first half of this story is entertaining. Once the super heroics start happening, it starts to feel a bit like 90s film. But then, my examples were 90s stories too... I'll check out the next volume, because I like a good legacy, torch passing story from the 90s. I like a good legacy, torch passing (Batman Beyond, Mask of Zorro, ect.) so the first half of this story is entertaining. Once the super heroics start happening, it starts to feel a bit like 90s film. But then, my examples were 90s stories too... I'll check out the next volume, because I like a good legacy, torch passing story from the 90s.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    Like Kevin Smith's Bionic Man and The Star Wars, Green Hornet is a comic-book-itized version of a movie that was never made. It's a great idea. The translation from movie to comic seems to work pretty well. I'd love a whole series like this, movies that never happened getting the comic book treatment. Green Hornet is obviously an older property, revived by Kevin Smith's script, then turned into a different movie which didn't do so hot. Which property would I like to see revived today? Easy. Richie Like Kevin Smith's Bionic Man and The Star Wars, Green Hornet is a comic-book-itized version of a movie that was never made. It's a great idea. The translation from movie to comic seems to work pretty well. I'd love a whole series like this, movies that never happened getting the comic book treatment. Green Hornet is obviously an older property, revived by Kevin Smith's script, then turned into a different movie which didn't do so hot. Which property would I like to see revived today? Easy. Richie Rich. -wait- Turns out, Netflix did it already! For kids. They changed up the premise a little. Instead of just being rich, Richie used vegetables to invent a new fuel source, which he sold for a lot of money. Already, boo. Richie Rich is not fun if he earned the money in a legitimate way. A clean-burning energy source made from organic matter? That changes the world completely. That dude DESERVES a trillion dollars, easy! That's no fun. I don't want a story about a rich guy who DESERVES to be rich (and who, honestly, would make the world its trillion dollars back in like 45 minutes). What would MY Richie Rich be like? First off, the Netflix version says he has a heart of gold. Great idea. Episode 1: Richie is implanted with a solid gold heart. This causes him lots of problems, he nearly dies throughout the series, but he doesn't care. He understands the importance of someone in his position engaging in conspicuous consumption, damn it. Episode 2: Richie turns 16 and buys a supercar. Well, like a dozen supercars. He puts them through a series of tests to determine which is the best. A series of bizarre, destructive, thoroughly watchable tests. Such as getting cadavers and hitting them at 50 MPH to see which does the least damage and increases his likelihood of getting away. Episode 3: Richie goes to the woods to set up a cabin for his heirs to inherit. He constructs several secret passages, Satanic tableaus, and other bizarre shit to really creep the hell out of the future. Just him with a backpack and a hose, spraying blood all over the wall where they've treated portions of it so a pentstaka (combo pentagram swastika) shows up amid the blood. Episode 4: It turns out Richie is part of an HOA. He's forced to attend a meeting where they talk about who puts out their garbage when. Richie laughs, puts on his jetpack, and says, "Just tell my butler when to do it and he'll get it done. Enjoy your neighborhood student council or whatever the hell this is." Then he zooms off. Episode 5: Road trip! Richie hits the road in an RV so long he spends the entire time making his way from the back of the thing to the front. Think Snowpiercer but with more carpeting. Episode 6: After seeing a fellow rich person light a cigar with a $100 dollar bill, Richie becomes obsessed with the idea and starts assembling things that can be lit on fire. Candles, fireplaces, firepits. He finds a nearby kid's birthday just so he can go and light the candles with a hundo. Episode 7: Because of some clause involved in his inheritance, Richie must spend one day a year entertaining the requests of alleged long-lost family members. They come, make pitches, and he's super bored. Until someone pitches a way for Richie to fund an island where it's legal to hunt the deadliest prey...man (with a gun). Episode 8: Richie goes through his enemies list and exacts elaborate revenge on everyone who has ever wronged him. Episode 9: Richie discovers the Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. He's having trouble parting with items until he realizes that it's not so much about him having stuff as it is about other people NOT having stuff. He puts all his junk in a giant, dollar-sign-shaped swimming pool and lights it all on fire (using a $100 bill, of course. Continuity). Episode 10: Richie is offered the chance to swap with his doppelganger and work in a factory for a day. Which he doesn't do. Instead, the entire episode is him explaining that he's not a moron, he KNOWS working sucks, and he doesn't really see the point of doing something that he knows he's going to hate. "I can be fairly certain that inserting a pin into my eye would not be fun, and I'm not interested in confirming my suspicion."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Based on the screen play that Smith wrote that never got made into a movie ... and it's understandable why. While not great, it is fun and probably still better than the movie that somehow did get made. Based on the screen play that Smith wrote that never got made into a movie ... and it's understandable why. While not great, it is fun and probably still better than the movie that somehow did get made.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Matt Eldridge

    So far, this is the worst comic I've read this year. The art's barely passable (a massive pet peeve of mine with Dynamie comics, especially when they get Alex Ross covers) but the dialouge is pretty god awful, every attempt at "comedy" is pretty groan worthy. Everyone talks with the same type of dialogue style, making it sound so very inauthentic and annoying. And even then, the plot is pretty slack. Nothing really feels like they were foreshadowed or paid off well or at all, just more like it wa So far, this is the worst comic I've read this year. The art's barely passable (a massive pet peeve of mine with Dynamie comics, especially when they get Alex Ross covers) but the dialouge is pretty god awful, every attempt at "comedy" is pretty groan worthy. Everyone talks with the same type of dialogue style, making it sound so very inauthentic and annoying. And even then, the plot is pretty slack. Nothing really feels like they were foreshadowed or paid off well or at all, just more like it was going through the motions with only half-baked ideas. Like why does Britt Reid Jr know so much about fighting if he never knew his dad was the Green Hornet, or even a background in martial arts training? Why wouldn't Mulan, daughter of Kato, not want to be Green Hornet herself? Why even bother setting this in modern day and, not say, the '60s like the classic tv show? Or the '80s? Why even bother giving Britt Reid Jr the mantle of GH when he shows nothing of anything useful in tactics? Why did his father keep his past as the original Green Hornet in the first place? If you want to see a better reboot of Green Hornet, you should see the Seth Rogan Green Hornet movie. Granted, you'll totally forget about it shortly after finishing it, but at least it tried to be innovative. The characterizations in that movie alone are far superior than what you'll see here. And the final insult? The redesigned costume on the cover of each comics? Doesn't appear at all in this book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    After the travesty that is the brutally-reviewed Batman book this year, I expected very little from this. The intro by Smith set me up for a weak story, and then I leaped into it - and couldn't put it down until it was done (and I want the next volume NOW). The way this was paced, written and laid out, it feels like the storyboards for a blockbuster action-comedy movie. Why did Seth Rogen's sad-looking tale get made instead, exactly? Great writing - especially given the collaboration (apparently After the travesty that is the brutally-reviewed Batman book this year, I expected very little from this. The intro by Smith set me up for a weak story, and then I leaped into it - and couldn't put it down until it was done (and I want the next volume NOW). The way this was paced, written and laid out, it feels like the storyboards for a blockbuster action-comedy movie. Why did Seth Rogen's sad-looking tale get made instead, exactly? Great writing - especially given the collaboration (apparently faithful to Smith's source script, and then polished by him at the end) - and incredibly driving action and pacing. I felt like I could hear the driving soundtrack booming all around me. Very satisfying read - some good twists and turns, and sets up some great plots for the future.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eden

    I had seen the movie, and thought these are man just as average as Joe. Well I wanted, no needed to know more about them and why they become the super heroes we all have grown to love. The store was more complex than the movie made it out to be and the context of the interaction was funnier. The more I learn about Kevin Smith the more I like him. He is a bank of knowledge on anything to do with comic books. I hope to one day have half the understanding that he does. The more I get into comics th I had seen the movie, and thought these are man just as average as Joe. Well I wanted, no needed to know more about them and why they become the super heroes we all have grown to love. The store was more complex than the movie made it out to be and the context of the interaction was funnier. The more I learn about Kevin Smith the more I like him. He is a bank of knowledge on anything to do with comic books. I hope to one day have half the understanding that he does. The more I get into comics the more I like it. The key however is to have the back story to truly have a love and understanding of the heroes. Like so many of us, how we are today is a product of our past actions, events and beliefs.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    ***DISCLAIMER!!!*** So again, I got issue #1 of this on Humble Bundle as a freebie. Art was great, potential was decent, but it never got a chance to get started obviously. Reading this, I can't figure out if Seth Rogen wasted Kevin Smith's version, or if they were just very similar from what I saw... We'll see if I get around to the rest of this. ***DISCLAIMER!!!*** So again, I got issue #1 of this on Humble Bundle as a freebie. Art was great, potential was decent, but it never got a chance to get started obviously. Reading this, I can't figure out if Seth Rogen wasted Kevin Smith's version, or if they were just very similar from what I saw... We'll see if I get around to the rest of this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Story was okay. Great art.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    As a newbie to this character I wasn't sure what to expect but I really loved the whole aesthetic of this volume and the inter-generational conflict. Suspenseful and fun. Roll on volume 2! As a newbie to this character I wasn't sure what to expect but I really loved the whole aesthetic of this volume and the inter-generational conflict. Suspenseful and fun. Roll on volume 2!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eric Mesa

    This review applies to both volumes 1 and 2. It is a reprint from http://www.comicpow.com/2015/01/14/ke... Follow that link to see the article along with related images from the comics. ---------- As I mentioned in my John Carter first look, I’m somewhat new to Dynamite’s properties; more accurately, their licensed properties. When I attended the Pulp Panel at Baltimore Comic-Con 2014, I was interested in the Green Hornet for the first time. My only previous exposure was the trailer for the Seth R This review applies to both volumes 1 and 2. It is a reprint from http://www.comicpow.com/2015/01/14/ke... Follow that link to see the article along with related images from the comics. ---------- As I mentioned in my John Carter first look, I’m somewhat new to Dynamite’s properties; more accurately, their licensed properties. When I attended the Pulp Panel at Baltimore Comic-Con 2014, I was interested in the Green Hornet for the first time. My only previous exposure was the trailer for the Seth Rogan film. I knew it was an old character from the time of the radio serials, but not much else. But after hearing about Mark Waid’s take on it, I flagged it as something to check out. Luckily for me, this year Dynamite did a Humble Bundle which included Kevin Smith’s Green Hornet. With the current near glut of comic book movies going to the silver screen, it was interesting to learn that Smith’s run on the comic was based on a Miramax movie script he wrote, but which was never produced. As a Kevin Smith fan, this intrigued me. Let’s first take a brief walk through the plot before looking at some of the themes Smith employs as well as any cinema-ness that sticks out compared to traditional comics. The story open in what, at least to me, appears to be an unspecified time period. Smith seems to be deliberately leaving it open to interpretation whether this takes place in the 1930s of the original Green Hornet stories or a more modern time. The Green Hornet (Britt Reid) takes out the last crime family and retires. Unlike Batman, his appearance does not lead to escalation of ever crazier criminals. Perhaps unrealistically, he has now reach his goal and instead of being corrupted by power, he’s just happy that his city has been rid of all the crime families. His wife knows he’s the Green Hornet, but his son does not. Fast-forward 20 years or so and we realize the opening must have taken place in the 70s or 80s because it’s now “today” and his son is essentially a male Paris Hilton: hounded by the paparazzi and a layabout living off his father’s money. Britt Reid Reid is then murdered by the Black Hornet. This is revealed to be a revenge killing for having stopped one of the crime families from the opening of the story (Black Hornet is the son of this crime boss). Interestingly, unlike many interpretations of Batman where Commissioner Gordon doesn’t know who Batman is, the DA did know who the Green Hornet was and sold this information to the Black Hornet. Britt Reid Jr becomes the new Green Hornet to avenge his father and Kato’s daughter, Mulan becomes the new Kato. Things go slightly off the rails in terms of the main themes when it turns out that the Black Hornet didn’t only want revenge on Britt Reid Sr, but also implanted a bug that allows him to assume control of the new awesome airplane for the DOD and things go from revenge (and other themes) to the oft-used movie theme of “don’t develop super weapons lest they fall into the wrong hands”. Smith isn’t shy about hitting the reader over the head with the main theme as it’s the name of the first volume: Sins of the Father. This trope is at least as old as the Bible, but it also occurs in real life – see the Hatfields and McCoys. What is most interesting about Smith’s use of the trope is the various ways it affects the children in this tale as well as how the adults dealt with it. Unlike other super heroes operating without super powers, Britt Sr does not involve his son in his crime-fighting. In fact, he keeps knowledge of it away from his son in hopes that he will not give his son the passion for following in his father’s footsteps. The legacy he selects for his son, newspaper magnate, is the one his son rejects. Of course, like a Greek Tragedy, this does not prevent the son from becoming the new Green Hornet and arguably pushes him in that direction. His father even had a contingency plan to whisk him out of the country (to China) if the father is ever attacked out of costume because it would mean his identity is compromised. So, for the sins of his father, Britt loses his father and is thrust into a crime fighting life (and probably would have been killed otherwise). In an example of positive stereotyping, Kato’s daughter, Mulan, has been training her entire life to be the next Green Hornet sidekick. Even if I misread that, we still have the positive stereotype of asians being so amazingly good at martial arts that Britt Jr is not ready to be Green Hornet until he can beat Mulan at a sparring session. Either way, she ends up being the next “Kato”. She gets off the easiest when it comes to consequences of her father’s actions. She gets to be a kick-ass sidekick. Finally, there’s the Juuma family. In an interesting mirror of his rival, the elder Juuma does not wish for his son to become embroiled in the rivalry. Unlike Reid, he does have his son working in the family business, but older Juuma realizes that revenge often leads to short-sighted thinking. They are planning on stealing a nuclear bomber that would allow them to exact tolls for every country – who cares if he had to be in jail for a while because of the Green Hornet. His sins cause Hirohito to have father gone for part of his childhood (jailed) and to develop an irrational hatred of the Green Hornet that ultimately costs them the most more important prize of the bomber. The Green Hornet has some superficial similarities with Batman – they’re both rich, white men protecting the city from seedy elements. Smith is a huge Batman fan (he has a podcast called Fat Man on Batman) and has even penned some Batman stories. There are four main differences between the two masked men in Smith’s depiction of The Green Hornet. I think these differences are pretty interesting because we’ve had Batman for just as long as we’ve had the Green Hornet, but the Green Hornet never reached as wide a popularity so we consider the types of stories told with Batman to be more of a natural reflection of what a hero must be like. Green Hornet paints a slightly different picture. A key part of the modern Batman is his lack of a traditional family and stunted emotional growth when it comes to relationships. In the modern mythology he’s raised by his family’s butler after his parents die. He then goes off into the wilderness to be reborn (a common trope at least as old as the Old Testament). When he returns he begins his suicidal quest against against the evil elements of Gotham City. Until he begins adopting children, he is not grounded and takes more risks. All of his father/son relationships leave something to be desired and his romantic relationships rarely pan out well. Batman never marries and the most compatible relationships to his lifestyle and neurosis are with villains: Talia al Ghul and Selina Kyle – aka Catwoman. By contrast Britt Reid is depicted in Smith’s incarnation as a family man. He has a wife and a son and day job that requires his presence much more than Batman at Wayne Industries. Batman is often presented to be a child’s emotional response to the death of his parents. Yet Britt who (in this version) has no tragedy to spur him on, also engages in vigilantism. While Batman never wants someone to go through what he went through, Britt wants to clean up the city for his child. Finally, while Batman keeps his caped identity a secret from everyone (including most of those he adopts (until they figure it out)), Britt’s wife knows he’s the Green Hornet. It certainly helps to prevent the Batman Beyond storylines of “where were you last night?” A common thesis is that Batman is the cause of his super villains. When he brought superior force and thinking to the fight against crime in Gotham he created a darwinistic pressure on the criminals to up their game if they wanted to continue to operate in Gotham. Thus all the common thugs fall away and, except for a crime family or two left in for legacy reasons, everyone works for the smartest (Riddler), most ruthless (Penguin), or most insane (Joker). Interestingly, Smith depicts the only response to the Green Hornet’s success is that some crime families try to team up. No masked villains appear to challenge him. (I am ignoring the Black Hornet of this story because it’s not a response to the Green Hornet, but an attempt to drag the Hornet name through the mud) So Smith reminds us that it’s not inevitable that Batman’s existence would have created his villains. Another pretty big difference, and one that confused me as someone wasn’t familiar with the Green Hornet mythos, is that the Green Hornet assumes the guise not of a vigilante (like Batman), but that of another gangster. So while the Gotham Underworld knows they’re dealing with a vigilante, Green Hornet’s enemies think he’s merely another one of them who is more effective. Perhaps this is part of what prevents the escalation that occurs in Batman. Interestingly, Britt has his newspapers write editorials confirming that the Green Hornet is a criminal boss and condemning his actions. The biggest difference, however, is that the Green Hornet actually accomplishes his job. I know on a meta level why this can’t be so in Batman. If Batman were to finally win, there would be no new Batman stories. The enemies need to constantly escape or new ones arise. It would make a nice story along the lines of Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow to see Batman finally able to retire and perhaps raise a family. Although, given his relationship issues (as I quickly mentioned, but have been elaborated all over the net) – there’s a certain truth to the future as depicted in Batman Beyond where Bruce ends up all alone. But in Britt’s instance, he’s able to go back to being a regular family man and business owner. Green Hornet Vol 2 - Mulan's revealGreen Hornet Vol 2 – Mulan’s reveal Moving away from comparisons with his pulp-era contemporary, one of the best reveals near the end is the reveal that Mulan is a lesbian. I thought the reveal was great on a few different levels. First of all, it’s so rare for a male and female lead not to be romantic interests. Second, nothing about Mulan as depicted in these first two volumes conforms to any lesbian stereotypes. The reveal is a surprise and shock to both the main character and the reader. Second only to a need for more characters of color in our media is the need for diverse sexualities. Since the 80s there has been a gradual increase in the number of LGBT characters in media, but only most recently have we started to see them represented in as many variations as there are in real life. While there are certainly people who resemble the stereotypes (or they wouldn’t exist), I’ve found it much more common to only know someone’s sexuality only when they discuss their partner/spouse. As refreshing as it was not to have the usual male/female sexual tension among the leads, I do think there is a lot of room for authors to explore the dynamics of a hero/sidekick relationship. I’m sure in the nearly 100 years of comics it’s been explored, but it seems really rare. There are definitely some potential stories in the power dynamics there. Finally, I just wanted to take few words to explore some random things I noticed in these volumes. Smith’s a master of dialogue and so it’s no surprise that the banter during the introductory fight and the banter when Britt Jr and Kato are trapped are pretty classic Smith. Also, his sense of comedy adds a great commentary to the idea of companies needing to update old ideas rather than just sticking to them by having Britt Jr try out a bunch of updated costumes with each having its own drawbacks before he just goes with the classic costume. One of the most interesting bits of trivia any comic fan eventually learns is that Batman used to carry a gun and didn’t even have any issues with killing enemies. Since the Green Hornet is from that same pulp era, I think it’s interesting he shoots a dart gun rather than a regular gun. I wonder if this was a change Smith made or a gimmick the original had. So that was one man’s take on a classic pulp character; one that was originally to appear on the silver screen. In about a month we’ll take a look at Mark Waid’s take on the Green Hornet to see how he brings this character from the 30s to the 2010s.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dan Trudeau

    3.5 stars. I've had a love for the Green Hornet since reading the Now Comics series in the late 80s. That series used a generational approach to the character that allowed the previous incarnations of the character to exist alongside the current version. This series takes a similar approach, with the children of the "original" Green Hornet and Kato picking up the mantles once an old enemy returns. Since this is based off an unproduced Kevin Smith screenplay, it's hard to not draw comparisons with 3.5 stars. I've had a love for the Green Hornet since reading the Now Comics series in the late 80s. That series used a generational approach to the character that allowed the previous incarnations of the character to exist alongside the current version. This series takes a similar approach, with the children of the "original" Green Hornet and Kato picking up the mantles once an old enemy returns. Since this is based off an unproduced Kevin Smith screenplay, it's hard to not draw comparisons with the Seth Rogen-starring film we eventually got. I can say with confidence the unproduced screenplay is superior to the one that was shot. So how is it as a comic book? It's a good read. I wasn't blown away, but it's my favorite of the modern Green Hornet books. I can't say if it will create new fans, but it was an enjoyable way to spend an afternoon.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    I know absolutely nothing about Green Hornet (okay, I have seen the Seth Rogan movie, but I'm not sure that counts). I felt like this did a decent job introducing the character. One thing I liked about this book is that it starts out with the "classic" version of the character and then shifts to modern day. This gives a feel for what the character is about and what this series in particular is setting out to do. It is in sort of a tough position trying to make the book accessible to people like I know absolutely nothing about Green Hornet (okay, I have seen the Seth Rogan movie, but I'm not sure that counts). I felt like this did a decent job introducing the character. One thing I liked about this book is that it starts out with the "classic" version of the character and then shifts to modern day. This gives a feel for what the character is about and what this series in particular is setting out to do. It is in sort of a tough position trying to make the book accessible to people like me that know little or nothing about the character and tell an interesting story. Plot wise it moves kind of slowly. There is plenty of action to keep things moving though. My interest is piqued enough that I will read the second volume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Kevin Smith is obviously the big draw here but he doesn't bring anything spectacular to the table, at least in the first volume. The art by Hester and Lau was worth the price though. Their fight scenes were dynamic and show a ton of promise. Smith's plot was bogged down by a slow moving history lesson that set up the obvious. The second volume should be given more room to breath. Overall, a good but unoriginal read. Kevin Smith is obviously the big draw here but he doesn't bring anything spectacular to the table, at least in the first volume. The art by Hester and Lau was worth the price though. Their fight scenes were dynamic and show a ton of promise. Smith's plot was bogged down by a slow moving history lesson that set up the obvious. The second volume should be given more room to breath. Overall, a good but unoriginal read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Mckillip

    It reads like a popcorn action movie - which in a way, it is. Kevin Smith took his unused Green Hornet movie script and let the folks at Dynamite Comics adapt it into a comic. The plot is brisk and fun. Plenty of popping dialogue from Kevin Smith. And there is just enough weight to the story with the father/son themes to provide a lit bit of an emotional anchor to the book. I’m looking forward to reading the second half of the story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven Shinder

    This story is based on a script that Kevin Smith wrote for Miramax. He explains it in a little forward at the beginning. This feels very much like the beginning of the movie. I actually enjoyed the Seth Rogen film, but I think Kevin Smith's take could've worked as a film as well. The artwork is definitely visually appealing, making this a smooth read. And there is emotion as Brit has relationship issues and deals with the death of his father and having to carry his legacy. This story is based on a script that Kevin Smith wrote for Miramax. He explains it in a little forward at the beginning. This feels very much like the beginning of the movie. I actually enjoyed the Seth Rogen film, but I think Kevin Smith's take could've worked as a film as well. The artwork is definitely visually appealing, making this a smooth read. And there is emotion as Brit has relationship issues and deals with the death of his father and having to carry his legacy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rubin Carpenter

    This modern stylized version of the classic pulp characters almost works moments of humanity contrast yet subtle similarity between the villains and heroes and cinematic fight scenes that are awesome it's good but not great some of the interaction between characters doesn't work and some of the plot is a little too standard and flat however it's good enough to have me wanting more on to volume 2 This modern stylized version of the classic pulp characters almost works moments of humanity contrast yet subtle similarity between the villains and heroes and cinematic fight scenes that are awesome it's good but not great some of the interaction between characters doesn't work and some of the plot is a little too standard and flat however it's good enough to have me wanting more on to volume 2

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I've been a Kevin Smith fan for a while now, thanks to his work on Daredevil and the Jersey trilogy. I only knew a little about Green Hornet going in, but that wasn't an issue here since this is an origin story, so it's a perfect place to start. Great dialogue and humor provides a nice balance to the action. I like the art too, so it's a solid read, especially if you're a Smith fan. I've been a Kevin Smith fan for a while now, thanks to his work on Daredevil and the Jersey trilogy. I only knew a little about Green Hornet going in, but that wasn't an issue here since this is an origin story, so it's a perfect place to start. Great dialogue and humor provides a nice balance to the action. I like the art too, so it's a solid read, especially if you're a Smith fan.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matt Kelland

    Good fun

  20. 5 out of 5

    Garrick

    Tis good but I do not think I need to read the next volume.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The Green Hornet - a masked vigilante with a martial arts chauffeur sidekick called Kato and a souped up limo called Black Beauty, out to take down gangsters while appearing to the public to be a gangster himself wanting control of Century City's crime. After taking down the last of the crime families, Green Hornet or to use his real name, Britt Reid, hangs up his mask and turns to a normal life, focusing on work and family. Cut to the present day when Reid's family is changed - his wife has pas The Green Hornet - a masked vigilante with a martial arts chauffeur sidekick called Kato and a souped up limo called Black Beauty, out to take down gangsters while appearing to the public to be a gangster himself wanting control of Century City's crime. After taking down the last of the crime families, Green Hornet or to use his real name, Britt Reid, hangs up his mask and turns to a normal life, focusing on work and family. Cut to the present day when Reid's family is changed - his wife has passed away and his son has grown up to become a spoilt, self entitled Trust Fund brat. Reid is old now, close to retirement, who has still kept his secret life as the Green Hornet from his son, when he is killed at a fundraiser by someone calling themselves "the Black Hornet". Suddenly Britt Reid Jnr, frustrated and out for revenge, is approached by an elderly Asian man who claims to have known his father and so begins the cycle that leads to the new Green Hornet and a new Kato for a new audience. Kevin Smith's script for "The Green Hornet" is here adapted into comic book form after Smith passed on developing it into a movie. Smith does a great job of bringing the story to an audience unfamiliar with The Green Hornet, and you're quickly brought up to speed with the old story and can start fresh on the new. Smith's fast plotting and keen ear for dialogue means that despite The Green Hornet having no superpowers and not being nearly as "pimp" (to use Smith's vernacular) as Batman, it is nevertheless a compelling story that has you thinking that it would have made a great movie after all. Jonathan Lau's art is nothing short of stunning and every panel is a masterclass in comic book illustration. He handles action sequences particularly well with the new Kato, Mulan, benefitting from well executed page layouts and imaginative poses, the sequences seem almost to come to life on the page. While some might not approve of the way the new Green Hornet is a bit less serious than the previous incarnation, you have to give Smith leeway as he is dealing with a new Britt Reid in a new age. He's not his father and he's from a different background, so I think there's room to improvise. You wouldn't think that the Green Hornet is the most compelling of superheroes, but Smith and Lau nonetheless make him interesting in this reboot and made me want to know what happens in Volume 2. A really interesting book and a great read, here's hoping Michel Gondry's movie version is as good!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    In “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay”, Michael Chabon makes reference to his comic artist Josef Kavalier making regular trips to the cinema – not for personal entertainment, but to learn cinematography tricks that he could apply to his drawings. This initiative and innovation, combined with his talent, made him a well-respected artist in the field. In “The Green Hornet – Volume 1: Sins of the Father”, the fictitious concept described above is applied in the real world. Kevin Smith wrot In “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay”, Michael Chabon makes reference to his comic artist Josef Kavalier making regular trips to the cinema – not for personal entertainment, but to learn cinematography tricks that he could apply to his drawings. This initiative and innovation, combined with his talent, made him a well-respected artist in the field. In “The Green Hornet – Volume 1: Sins of the Father”, the fictitious concept described above is applied in the real world. Kevin Smith wrote a script for a prospective Green Hornet movie which was never made. (In fact, an alternative Green Hornet movie was eventually made using other creative talents.) It was suggested that they take the script and convert it to a comic book limited series. In my opinion, the results were mixed. The art itself is quite nice from a visual standpoint AND it also does a good job in allowing the reader to advance the story. Not perfect – for example, some of the “pages” actually need to be read left-to-right across both left and right pages, as opposed to the traditional one-page-at-a-time technique. It was not clear to me, the reader, this was the case, and required me to do a little rereading before I understood what was going on. The plot was nice enough, although a little stereotypical. The Green Hornet and Kato successfully retired from their pseudo-criminal illusion which was actually their successful attempt to fight crime. Both raised a child, who end up following in their footsteps when the crime syndicates return to take over the city. There are a lot of action sequences in this book, as befits a visual medium. At some times, it felt like the fight scenes ran on too long for me, though and avoided the need to perform any character development. It was worth moving on to the second part (of 2) of this series, and was pleasant enough, but out of all of the comics I've ever read, this was simply one of them. Rating: 3 1/2 stars, rounded down to 3 stars where 1/2 stars are not permitted.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    The good news is that this first of two volumes is worth reading. Smith originally abandoned this story when it was supposed to be a motion picture because he didn't think he could pull it off. Coming up in Hollywood as one of the most obvious indy wunderkinds of the '90s, the closest Smith had come to this kind of material was Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, the epic version of his slacker cinema (or that could be Dogma). He was later adopted into the comics community, famously reviving (quite The good news is that this first of two volumes is worth reading. Smith originally abandoned this story when it was supposed to be a motion picture because he didn't think he could pull it off. Coming up in Hollywood as one of the most obvious indy wunderkinds of the '90s, the closest Smith had come to this kind of material was Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, the epic version of his slacker cinema (or that could be Dogma). He was later adopted into the comics community, famously reviving (quite literally) Green Arrow. And so someone decided he could also do a superhero movie. Amazingly or not, Smith's Green Hornet is not hugely different from the movie that debuted in theaters without his involvement. Both take inspiration from the character's then-most recent comics appearances that focused on a second generation, and both feature a story wherein that second generation is initially wholly unprepared and unsuited for such a calling. And somewhat amazingly, the Seth Rogen version is funnier. Smith's briefly flirts with the same attitude, and at that point is very similar to the Cop Out material Smith later disowned. (In fact, if you want to see how uncomfortable he really would have been making a Green Hornet movie, watch Cop Out, which is better than you've heard or thought personally. What it isn't is a Kevin Smith movie.) The rest is awkward flirting with comic book tropes. And it only gets worse in the second volume. But overall, if you want to see this story in its best light, this initial volume is the way to go. And at this point, it really does look like it works.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ I hadn't seen the movie and wasn't well versed in the Green Hornet series. So I took this read as a stand alone introduction to The Green Hornet. The good: -- Does a good job of introducing the mythology/universe for those new to Green Hornet -- Introduces a new generation of Green Hornet - modern and now -- Nicely illustrated in full color throughout The Bad: -- Lacks focus/feels overblown. Nearly half the book is about th More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ I hadn't seen the movie and wasn't well versed in the Green Hornet series. So I took this read as a stand alone introduction to The Green Hornet. The good: -- Does a good job of introducing the mythology/universe for those new to Green Hornet -- Introduces a new generation of Green Hornet - modern and now -- Nicely illustrated in full color throughout The Bad: -- Lacks focus/feels overblown. Nearly half the book is about the father - but the series is about the son. We didn't need as much of the father's perspective to introduce and bring in the new generation. Nor did we need as much perspective of the villains -- Almost misogynistic. Female characters should be seen, not heard, and beat up people rudely. Boys are cool, get to say funny one liners, and have fun toys. -- Hard to tell if there will be character development beyond mopey dilettante son with a lot of one-liner quips. I hope the story gets better in later volumes. In all, I didn't like the book (really had to force myself to finish it). It doesn't lend itself to repeat readings and is very shallow (and perhaps more accessible because of it?). Kevin Smith does a great job of appealing to the young boy fantasies in all of us. Well, that is, all of us who aren't girls like me. And maybe that was the problem.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scribd

    Before Batman was a gleam in Bill Finger and Bob Kane’s eyes, there was the Green Hornet. Britt Reid is a wealthy newspaper magnate who dresses up in a mask and overcoat at night to infiltrate organized crime rings in his hometown of Century City and subtly help the police wipe them out. With his trusty sidekick and chauffeur, Kato, driving him around in the technologically advanced sports car The Black Beauty, The Hornet has fought his way through the annals of radio, TV, film and comic book hi Before Batman was a gleam in Bill Finger and Bob Kane’s eyes, there was the Green Hornet. Britt Reid is a wealthy newspaper magnate who dresses up in a mask and overcoat at night to infiltrate organized crime rings in his hometown of Century City and subtly help the police wipe them out. With his trusty sidekick and chauffeur, Kato, driving him around in the technologically advanced sports car The Black Beauty, The Hornet has fought his way through the annals of radio, TV, film and comic book history since the mid-1930s. Kevin Smith’s take on the character is decidedly modern; with the Green Hornet having finally conquered organized crime in his city, he retires, thinking his job done. But at a grand gala hosted in his mansion, a mysterious Black Hornet crashes the party, killing the Green Hornet and leaving his son and Kato’s daughter to take up the mantle. Fans of Smith’s particular brand of humor will not be disappointed. His dialogue is airtight and often takes hilarious potshots at the genre and medium. Andy Lau’s art manages to meld all the gritty glamour of classic Film Noir with a beautiful modern flair, and Alex Ross’s painted covers are, as always, breathtaking. Smith’s Green Hornet tackles themes of legacy and identity, blurs the line between heroism and criminality, and—like the Hornet streaking through the streets of Century City in the back of Black Beauty—is one hell of a ride.

  26. 5 out of 5

    James Kinsley

    There's no doubt that Smith can write comics. He can hold his own with any other Batman writer around today, and with Onomatopoeia, he and Phil Hester have created one of DC's most striking modern villains. But there is something about his Green Hornet that falls flat. Part of that feels like it may be due to the character. There's maybe a reason why the character fell into disuse, and various attempts to kickstart it have failed. The story itself also feels a bit by-the-numbers. Retired hero, l There's no doubt that Smith can write comics. He can hold his own with any other Batman writer around today, and with Onomatopoeia, he and Phil Hester have created one of DC's most striking modern villains. But there is something about his Green Hornet that falls flat. Part of that feels like it may be due to the character. There's maybe a reason why the character fell into disuse, and various attempts to kickstart it have failed. The story itself also feels a bit by-the-numbers. Retired hero, layabout son, hero dies, son takes up mantle - little in this collection of the first five issues of Smith's Hornet startles. The one interesting thing to note that this is based on Smith's script for the movie version of Green Hornet that Miramax signed him up to make, which Smith wrote and then withdrew from. But it has to be said , that whilst Gondry's eventual film version was no triumph, there's little in this vision to think that we lost out on a classic. All that said, there's nothing woeful about the book either. The artwork's nice, there's some reasonable gags, and the action zips along nicely. The collection also features all the original cover art variants, by artists including the great Alex Ross. So not a disaster, but ultimately disposable.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Juho Salo

    This volume covers the first act of Smith's Green Hornet-script from years past. The problem with updating characters that were last published decades ago (such as the Shadow or Green Hornet) is that they lack the natural growth that the ongoing series characters (such as Superman and Batman) have had. Forcing such growth easily means losing the soul of the character, leaving only few remnants of the original series: either you set the story in past, which makes a story that was supposed to refle This volume covers the first act of Smith's Green Hornet-script from years past. The problem with updating characters that were last published decades ago (such as the Shadow or Green Hornet) is that they lack the natural growth that the ongoing series characters (such as Superman and Batman) have had. Forcing such growth easily means losing the soul of the character, leaving only few remnants of the original series: either you set the story in past, which makes a story that was supposed to reflect the present reflect the (badly understood) past, try to fit the old story to the new century (losing the context) or simply literally gunning the hero down and saying that the story revolves around his legacy. In case you didn't guess, Smith went with the last one. This is not a bad solution, but is it the right one? I'm not sure. The story rolls well, but I think if I were in this for the Green Hornet instead of Kevin Smith, I'd be disappointed. If you gut the character and leave solely the name, you could have changed the name too. Now the legacy of the radio series hinders new readers like me, while old fans are probably disappointed to see their hero gunned down few pages into the story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Willow Redd

    This. This is why I wanted to see Kevin Smith's version of the Green Hornet instead of the Michel Gondry/Seth Rogen horror-show. This is so much what I expected out of the Green Hornet, I actually started writing a version very similar to it before I found out Smith was. Now I wish I'd finished it. I'd be interested to see exactly how similar the two scripts ended up. I've always been a fan of the Green Hornet, especially the fact that he is a descendant of the Lone Ranger (that's canon, by the w This. This is why I wanted to see Kevin Smith's version of the Green Hornet instead of the Michel Gondry/Seth Rogen horror-show. This is so much what I expected out of the Green Hornet, I actually started writing a version very similar to it before I found out Smith was. Now I wish I'd finished it. I'd be interested to see exactly how similar the two scripts ended up. I've always been a fan of the Green Hornet, especially the fact that he is a descendant of the Lone Ranger (that's canon, by the way), and I've always wanted to see him get a decent treatment. The old 60s TV show was fun and worked well with the campy Batman of the same era (which is why there were crossovers between the two), but it wasn't a serious take on the character. In fact, outside of comics and the original radio series, the Hornet has never been given serious consideration. Smith, fortunately, gives the character, his history, and the generational continuation its due diligence. Really wish we could have seen THIS version of the movie, but the comic is a welcome substitute. Fun, quick read. Ready for Volume 2.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    (This review includes both Vol. 1 and 2) Best way to describe this title? I got a kick out of it! Originally conceived as a movie, the story is an enjoyable action fest with enough emotion to flesh it out but not overwhelm. It's designed to be modern pulp fun with plenty of goofy scenes and one liners. It makes no effort to be more than that - a refreshing change from comics that try too hard to be 'deep'. I thought creating a new Green Hornet for the modern age was a great way to update the char (This review includes both Vol. 1 and 2) Best way to describe this title? I got a kick out of it! Originally conceived as a movie, the story is an enjoyable action fest with enough emotion to flesh it out but not overwhelm. It's designed to be modern pulp fun with plenty of goofy scenes and one liners. It makes no effort to be more than that - a refreshing change from comics that try too hard to be 'deep'. I thought creating a new Green Hornet for the modern age was a great way to update the character without disrespecting or destroying the original. While the writing isn't sophisticated it is entertaining, even if the older Kato completely steals the show! What makes this a 4 versus 3 star book(s) is the artwork. The creative breakdowns by Phil Hester followed by Lau's pencils and, most important in my opinion, Nunes' colors makes the art pop. It feels smooth and sleek which suits the action. I would have liked a few facial expressions cleaned up a bit, but overall I enjoyed the 'show' so to speak.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    Well, it doesn't sound like Kevin Smith, for the most part. It's a decent story (and considering it's a script that was discarded before the Seth Rogen movie was made, it seems to have a lot in common with how that one played out), with some gorgeous artwork and very kinetic (although occasionally confusing) action sequences. Green Hornet is long retired, and his son is not the type that seems likely to take up the mantle; at least not until other events come into play. The story is a fairly tro Well, it doesn't sound like Kevin Smith, for the most part. It's a decent story (and considering it's a script that was discarded before the Seth Rogen movie was made, it seems to have a lot in common with how that one played out), with some gorgeous artwork and very kinetic (although occasionally confusing) action sequences. Green Hornet is long retired, and his son is not the type that seems likely to take up the mantle; at least not until other events come into play. The story is a fairly trope-filled hero origin story, with a couple of pieces switched to make it a little unpredictable. But there isn't much in it that makes it sound like Kevin Smith's voice, which is a little disappointing. Otherwise, it's a decent read.

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